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Food-borne Diarrheal Infection

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1. Food-borne Diarrheal Infection

Food-borne Diarrheal Infection Food-borne Diarrheal Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Food-borne Diarrheal (...) Infection Food-borne Diarrheal Infection Aka: Food-borne Diarrheal Infection , Foodborne Illness , Food-Borne Disease , Food Poisoning From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology increasing in United States Cases per year: 48 million Hospitalizations: 128,000 l related deaths per year: 3000 Medical and associated costs per year: $4-14 billion Most cases are not seen by medical care Expanded fast food industry in part responsible Large scale food production affects many people More virulent organisms may

2018 FP Notebook

2. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Acute Diarrheal Infections in Adults

practicable nor cost-eff ective for every patient presenting with an acute diarrheal infection ( 28 ). No formal cost-eff ectiveness studies on the optimization of testing and reporting has been reported and these would be challenging to conduct. However, public health fundamentals would strongly support individual patient testing and reporting in a number of situations. Th ese include diarrhea outbreaks among workers who prepare and handle food, health-care workers, daycare (adult and child) attendees (...) of the patient’s illness and enable specifi c directed therapy. (Strong recommendation, very low level of evidence) 3. Traditional methods of diagnosis (bacterial culture, micro- scopy with and without special stains and immunofl uores- cence, and antigen testing) fail to reveal the etiology of the majority of cases of acute diarrheal infection. If available, the use of Food and Drug Administration-approved culture- independent methods of diagnosis can be recommended at least as an adjunct to traditional

2016 American College of Gastroenterology

3. CRACKCast E173 – Infectious Diarrheal Disease and Dehydration

virulent of the EHEC. Out-breaks have been linked to ground beef, petting zoos, contaminated apple cider, raw fruits and vegetables, and ingestion of water in recreational areas. HUS, the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal insufficiency, is a serious complication of EHEC infection and occurs in up to 15% of children with E. coli O157:H7. The overall incidence of HUS caused by a diarrheal pathogen (usually STEC) is estimated to be 2.1 cases per 100,000 persons per (...) CRACKCast E173 – Infectious Diarrheal Disease and Dehydration CRACKCast E173 - Infectious Diarrheal Disease and Dehydration - CanadiEM CRACKCast E173 – Infectious Diarrheal Disease and Dehydration In , by Chris Lipp April 30, 2018 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 173 (9th Ed.). Infectious diarrhea is a very common issue to deal with in the ER and resulting dehydration is especially important to recognize and treat appropriately. This episode will run you through the basics

2018 CandiEM

4. Food-borne Diarrheal Infection

Food-borne Diarrheal Infection Food-borne Diarrheal Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Food-borne Diarrheal (...) Infection Food-borne Diarrheal Infection Aka: Food-borne Diarrheal Infection , Foodborne Illness , Food-Borne Disease , Food Poisoning From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology increasing in United States Cases per year: 48 million Hospitalizations: 128,000 l related deaths per year: 3000 Medical and associated costs per year: $4-14 billion Most cases are not seen by medical care Expanded fast food industry in part responsible Large scale food production affects many people More virulent organisms may

2015 FP Notebook

5. “Koko et les lunettes magiques”: An educational entertainment tool to prevent parasitic worms and diarrheal diseases in Côte d’Ivoire (PubMed)

of the script and story board, and the production of the cartoon's initial version. Finally, the animated cartoon was pilot tested in eight selected schools and further fine-tuned.According to the questionnaire results, children believed that the consumption of sweet food, eating without washing their hands, sitting on the floor, and eating spoiled food were the main causes of parasitic worm infections. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, failure to grow, and general fatigue were mentioned (...) “Koko et les lunettes magiques”: An educational entertainment tool to prevent parasitic worms and diarrheal diseases in Côte d’Ivoire Integrated control programs, emphasizing preventive chemotherapy along with health education, can reduce the incidence of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis. The aim of this study was to develop an educational animated cartoon to improve school children's awareness regarding soil-transmitted helminthiasis, diarrheal diseases, and related

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2017 PLoS neglected tropical diseases

6. Water-borne Diarrheal Infection

Water-borne Diarrheal Infection Water-borne Diarrheal Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Water-borne Diarrheal (...) Infection Water-borne Diarrheal Infection Aka: Water-borne Diarrheal Infection , Waterborne Illness From Related Chapters II. Risk Factors Travel to endemic areas of Waterborne Illness Hiking in wilderness areas (especially drinking from mountain streams) Intake Untreated water Unpasteurized dairy products III. Causes: Waterborne Diarrheal infection (rapid onset 12-72 hours) Nontyphoidal (rapid onset 12-36 hours) (Intermediate onset 1-3 days) (slow onset 3-7 days) (Intermediate onset 3-5 days) (onset

2015 FP Notebook

7. Surveillance, Diagnosis and Management of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Ireland

Surveillance, Diagnosis and Management of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Ireland Surveillance, Diagnosis and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Ireland National Clinical Guideline No. 3 June 2014National Clinical Effectiveness Committee (NCEC) The National Clinical Effectiveness Committee (NCEC) was established as part of the Patient Safety First Initiative in September 2010. The NCECs mission is to provide a framework for national endorsement of clinical guidelines and audit (...) subcommittee of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC). (Appendix 1) Using this National Clinical Guideline This guideline is intended to be relevant to all healthcare staff involved in the care of patients/ residents that may be at risk of or have Clostridium difficile infection (referred to as C. difficile infection or CDI through this document) in acute hospitals, long-term care facilities, other institutions and in primary care nationally. Patients

2019 National Clinical Guidelines (Ireland)

8. Impact of the Nutritional Product PTM202 on Acute and Long-Term Recovery From Childhood Diarrheal Disease

trial of the nutritional product PTM202, which is a food product based on cow milk colostrum and eggs from hens that have been immunized against human diarrheal pathogens. Children between the ages of 6 months and 3 years will be enrolled at two sites in Guatemala who present with acute diarrhea. The study will have two strata according to the severity of the diarrhea. The study product will be administered over 3 days, and the investigators will assess the impact on diarrhea duration and severity (...) Impact of the Nutritional Product PTM202 on Acute and Long-Term Recovery From Childhood Diarrheal Disease Impact of the Nutritional Product PTM202 on Acute and Long-Term Recovery From Childhood Diarrheal Disease - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2015 Clinical Trials

9. Evaluating an Amino Acid Based Medical Food w/ Diarrhea in Carcinoid Syndrome & Other NETs

Evaluating an Amino Acid Based Medical Food w/ Diarrhea in Carcinoid Syndrome & Other NETs Evaluating an Amino Acid Based Medical Food w/ Diarrhea in Carcinoid Syndrome & Other NETs - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more (...) studies before adding more. Evaluating an Amino Acid Based Medical Food w/ Diarrhea in Carcinoid Syndrome & Other NETs The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03722511 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted

2018 Clinical Trials

10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children Clostridium difficile Search Search Clostridium difficile . Abstract A panel of experts was convened by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) to update the 2010 clinical practice guideline on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adults. The update, which has incorporated recommendations for children (following the adult recommendations (...) for epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment), includes significant changes in the management of this infection and reflects the evolving controversy over best methods for diagnosis. Clostridium difficile remains the most important cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea and has become the most commonly identified cause of healthcare-associated infection in adults in the United States. Moreover, C. difficile has established itself as an important community pathogen. Although the prevalence of the epidemic

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2017 Infectious Diseases Society of America

11. Early weaning increases diarrhea morbidity and mortality among uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers in Zambia. (PubMed)

Early weaning increases diarrhea morbidity and mortality among uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers in Zambia. Early weaning may reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission but may have deleterious consequences for uninfected children. Here we evaluate effects of early weaning on diarrhea morbidity and mortality of uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers.HIV-infected women in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomly assigned to breastfeeding for 4 months only or to continue (...) breastfeeding until the mother decided to stop. Replacement and complementary foods were provided and all women were counseled around feeding and hygiene. Diarrhea morbidity and mortality were assessed in 618 HIV-uninfected singletons alive and still breastfeeding at 4 months. Intent-to-treat analyses and comparisons based on actual feeding practices were conducted using regression methods.Between 4 and 6 months, diarrheal episodes were 1.8-fold (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-2.4) higher in the short

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2011 The Journal of infectious diseases

12. Serological Markers of Recent <i>Campylobacter jejuni</i> Infection in Patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome in the State of Piauí, Brazil, 2014-2016. (PubMed)

Serological Markers of Recent Campylobacter jejuni Infection in Patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome in the State of Piauí, Brazil, 2014-2016. In countries where poliomyelitis has been eradicated, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the leading cause of acute flaccid paralysis. The range of infections that precede GBS in Brazil is unknown. Campylobacter jejuni infection is the most frequent trigger of GBS worldwide. Given the lack of systematic surveillance of diarrheal diseases (...) , basic sanitation, and precautions during handling and preparation of food of animal origin may help prevent acute flaccid paralysis.

2018 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

13. A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Immunogenicity of a Vaccine Designed to Protect Against Infection With Shigella Sonnei in Healthy Adults

A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Immunogenicity of a Vaccine Designed to Protect Against Infection With Shigella Sonnei in Healthy Adults A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Immunogenicity of a Vaccine Designed to Protect Against Infection With Shigella Sonnei in Healthy Adults - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved (...) Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Immunogenicity of a Vaccine Designed to Protect Against Infection With Shigella Sonnei in Healthy Adults The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical

2018 Clinical Trials

14. Foodborne intestinal protozoan infection and associated factors among patients with watery diarrhea in Northern Ethiopia; a cross-sectional study (PubMed)

Foodborne intestinal protozoan infection and associated factors among patients with watery diarrhea in Northern Ethiopia; a cross-sectional study Intestinal protozoa are parasites transmitted by consumption of contaminated water and food and mainly affect children and elder people and cause considerable health problems. They are the leading causes of outpatient morbidity due to diarrhea in the developing countries. So, assessing water and food source of diarrheal patients and identifying (...) the main associated factors for transmission of protozoan parasitic infections help for effective control measures of protozoan infections. Hence, the current study was aimed at determining the prevalence of foodborne intestinal protozoa infections and associated factors among diarrheic patients in North Ethiopia.A health facility based cross-sectional study was conducted among 223 patients with watery diarrhea in four selected government health facilities in North Ethiopia from November 2016-June 2017

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2018 Journal of health, population, and nutrition

15. Identification of Host Factors of Norovirus Infections in Mini-Gut Model

, 2018 See Sponsor: Chinese University of Hong Kong Information provided by (Responsible Party): CHAN CHI WAI, Chinese University of Hong Kong Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The primary objective in this study is to establish a list of host cellular proteins that mediate norovirus infection. Norovirus is one of the most common pathogens attributed to diarrheal diseases from unsafe food. It is also the primary cause of mortality among young children and adults in foodborne (...) Identification of Host Factors of Norovirus Infections in Mini-Gut Model Identification of Host Factors of Norovirus Infections in Mini-Gut Model - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more

2017 Clinical Trials

16. Multi-Sectoral Agricultural Intervention to Improve Nutrition, Health, and Developmental Outcomes of HIV-infected and Affected Children in Western Kenya

Multi-Sectoral Agricultural Intervention to Improve Nutrition, Health, and Developmental Outcomes of HIV-infected and Affected Children in Western Kenya Multi-Sectoral Agricultural Intervention to Improve Nutrition, Health, and Developmental Outcomes of HIV-infected and Affected Children in Western Kenya - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail (...) Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Multi-Sectoral Agricultural Intervention to Improve Nutrition, Health, and Developmental Outcomes of HIV-infected and Affected Children in Western Kenya The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read

2017 Clinical Trials

17. Quantifying Vibrio cholerae Enterotoxicity in a Zebrafish Infection Model (PubMed)

Quantifying Vibrio cholerae Enterotoxicity in a Zebrafish Infection Model Vibrio cholerae is the etiological agent of cholera, an acute intestinal infection in humans characterized by voluminous watery diarrhea. Cholera is spread through ingestion of contaminated food or water, primarily in developing countries that lack the proper infrastructure for proper water and sewage treatment. Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic bacterium that inhabits coastal and estuarine areas, and is known to have several (...) to assess the effects of accessory toxins in the zebrafish, it was necessary to develop a method of quantifying diarrheal volume as a measure of pathogenesis. Here, we have adapted cell density, protein, and mucin assays, along with enumeration of V. cholerae in the zebrafish intestinal tract and in the infection water, to achieve this goal. Combined, these assays should help us determine which toxins have the greatest diarrheagenic effect in fish, and consequently, which toxins may play a role

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2017 Applied and environmental microbiology

18. Guidelines for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infections

, moderate-quality evidence) 29. Any diarrheal illness in women who are pregnant or periparturient should prompt testing for C. dif? cile . (Conditional recommendation, low-quality evidence) Infection Control and Prevention 30. A hospital-based infection control programs can help to decrease the incidence of CDI. (Conditional recommendation, moderate-quality evidence) 31. Routine screening for C. dif? cile in hospitalized patients without diarrhea is not recommended and asymptomatic carriers should (...) Guidelines for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infections nature publishing group 478 The American Journal of GASTROENTEROLOGY VOLUME 108 | APRIL 2013 www.amjgastro.com PRACTICE GUIDELINES INTRODUCTION Clostridium diffi cile infection (CDI) is a leading cause of hospital- associated gastrointestinal illness and places a high burden on our health-care system, with costs of 3.2 billion dollars annually ( 1,2 ). Th is guideline provides recommendations

2013 American College of Gastroenterology

19. Food Poisoning (Diagnosis)

The symptoms of food poisoning vary in degree and combination. They may include the following: Abdominal pain: Most severe in inflammatory processes; painful abdominal muscle cramps suggest underlying electrolyte loss Vomiting: Major presenting symptom of S aureus, B cereus, or Norovirus [ ] Diarrhea: Usually lasts less than 2 weeks Headache Fever: May be an invasive disease or an infection outside the GI tract Stool changes: Bloody or mucousy if invasion of intestinal or colonic mucosa; profuse rice (...) -watery if cholera or a similar process Reactive arthritis: Seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia infections Bloating: May be due to giardiasis More serious cases of food poisoning can result in life-threatening neurologic, hepatic, and renal syndromes leading to permanent disability or death. See for more detail. See , a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify various pathogens and symptoms related to foodborne disease. Diagnosis Examination of patients suspected of having

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Food Poisoning (Overview)

The symptoms of food poisoning vary in degree and combination. They may include the following: Abdominal pain: Most severe in inflammatory processes; painful abdominal muscle cramps suggest underlying electrolyte loss Vomiting: Major presenting symptom of S aureus, B cereus, or Norovirus [ ] Diarrhea: Usually lasts less than 2 weeks Headache Fever: May be an invasive disease or an infection outside the GI tract Stool changes: Bloody or mucousy if invasion of intestinal or colonic mucosa; profuse rice (...) -watery if cholera or a similar process Reactive arthritis: Seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia infections Bloating: May be due to giardiasis More serious cases of food poisoning can result in life-threatening neurologic, hepatic, and renal syndromes leading to permanent disability or death. See for more detail. See , a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify various pathogens and symptoms related to foodborne disease. Diagnosis Examination of patients suspected of having

2014 eMedicine.com

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