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Fishhook Removal

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1. Fishhook Removal

Fishhook Removal Fishhook Removal Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fishhook Removal Fishhook Removal Aka: Fishhook (...) Removal From Related Chapters II. Preparation Detach any connected fishing line Tape or cut uninvolved hooks Clean fishhook insertion site prior to removal Topical povidone- (betadine) or Hexachlorophene (Hibiclens) Administer Surgeon to wear III. First-line Technique: Retrograde Technique Indications Barbless fishhook Superficially embedded fishhook Images Retrograde Technique Technique See preparation above Apply downward pressure to fishhook shank Rotates hook deeper Disengages barb if present Back

2018 FP Notebook

2. Fishhook injury to the eyelid: case report and review of removal methods. (PubMed)

Fishhook injury to the eyelid: case report and review of removal methods. Fishhook injuries are most commonly seen among adult and adolescent anglers. However, children can also be injured by fishhooks. We present the case of an 11-year-old boy with an eyelid fishhook injury that was successfully managed in the emergency department. We review a variety of procedures that can be used to remove embedded fishhooks, including the suitability, advantages, and disadvantages of each method.

2015 Pediatric Emergency Care

3. Fishhook Removal: Case Reports and A Review of the Literature. (PubMed)

Fishhook Removal: Case Reports and A Review of the Literature. Fishhook injuries are common among people who fish for recreation, but can be encountered in anyone who has handled a fishhook. They represent a unique challenge for Emergency Physicians who seek to remove them without causing further tissue damage from the barbed nature of the hook.Our aim was to discuss the techniques available to providers in the removal of a barbed fishhook by illustrating actual cases seen in the Emergency (...) Department.We present two cases of patients with fishhook injuries. We discuss the proper assessment of these injuries. We describe techniques for removing a barbed hook from a patient's skin and offer images to guide management.Understanding the unique nature of fishhook injuries and awareness of techniques to manage them are essential to the practicing Emergency Physician.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2013 Journal of Emergency Medicine

4. Fishhook Removal

Fishhook Removal Fishhook Removal Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fishhook Removal Fishhook Removal Aka: Fishhook (...) Removal From Related Chapters II. Preparation Detach any connected fishing line Tape or cut uninvolved hooks Clean fishhook insertion site prior to removal Topical povidone- (betadine) or Hexachlorophene (Hibiclens) Administer Surgeon to wear III. First-line Technique: Retrograde Technique Indications Barbless fishhook Superficially embedded fishhook Images Retrograde Technique Technique See preparation above Apply downward pressure to fishhook shank Rotates hook deeper Disengages barb if present Back

2015 FP Notebook

5. Foreign Body Removal, Wound

and at the bases of fingers or toes are useful anesthetic application options to consider prior to an extensive evaluation or removal attempt. Removal of a nail through the hand or foot is aided by blocking the relevant nerve distributions prior to an attempt. [ , ] Field blocks that surround the site of a splinter or staple entrance are essential for pain management during the procedure. A digital nerve block facilitates the removal of a fishhook through a finger and also helps in postprocedure pain (...) Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2006. Chap 57; 859-79. Ling SN, Ong NC, North JB. Eighty-seven cases of a nail gun injury to the extremity. Emerg Med Australas . 2013 Dec. 25(6):603-7. . Capellan O, Hollander JE. Management of lacerations in the emergency department. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2003 Feb. 21(1):205-31. . Gammons MG, Jackson E. Fishhook removal. Am Fam Physician . 2001 Jun 1. 63(11):2231-6. . Crystal CS, McArthur TJ, Harrison B

2014 eMedicine.com

6. A lucky catch: Fishhook injury of the tongue (PubMed)

A lucky catch: Fishhook injury of the tongue Fishhook injuries, particularly those involving the upper limbs, are frequently encountered in recreational and commercial fishing settings. The oral cavity is rarely a site for such injury. We present the case of a 13-month-old male child who sustained a fishhook injury to the tongue whilst 'playing' with an unused fishhook at home. In this case there was minimal swelling, and the fishhook could be uneventfully removed under general anesthesia

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2010 Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock

7. Foreign Bodies of the Skin

Removal may not be needed with small asymptomatic inert metal objects Glass All glass is radiopaque, but <2 mm fragments are missed on XRay Glass fragments cause the most foreign body sensations Removal may not be needed with small asymptomatic glass that is difficult to find Pencil leads or graphite Should be removed as much as possible due to secondary ing Wood or vegetative material Must be removed due to infection and inflammation risk Fishhooks See III. Exam Evaluate circulation, sensation (...) Foreign Bodies of the Skin Aka: Foreign Bodies of the Skin , Foreign Body Removal , Splinter Removal , Retained Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. History Mechanism of Injury Bite injuries See or Consider retained tooth fragments and infection risk Broken objects Risk of retained and embedded fragments Sharp objects penetrating shoes, gloves or clothing See Risk of retained cloth, leather or Foreign Body Types Metal Easiest to identify on Xray Lower risk of infection with Retained Foreign Body

2018 FP Notebook

8. Botanical Dermatology (Follow-up)

, and burning may last for 2 hours. Persistent paresthesias may last for more than 12 hours. Most reactions are self-limited and require no treatment. Previous Next: Irritant Dermatitis Irritant dermatitis due to plants can result from direct mechanical injury or chemical contact. See . Mechanical irritant dermatitis Large spines and thorns can cause penetrating trauma, and the wounds can become secondarily infected. Smaller glochids (tufts of short, barbed hairs) embed in the skin like fishhooks. Although (...) pears ( Opuntia species) (see image below) can cause an extremely pruritic, papular eruption called sabra dermatitis, which can easily be confused with scabies or fiberglass dermatitis. Various glochid removal techniques are described, including the use of warm wax, glue, sticking plaster, facial masks, and cellophane tape. Prickly pears, Opuntia species. Chemical irritant dermatitis Several plant families possess chemicals that irritate human skin. One of the most common chemical irritants

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Botanical Dermatology (Diagnosis)

, and burning may last for 2 hours. Persistent paresthesias may last for more than 12 hours. Most reactions are self-limited and require no treatment. Previous Next: Irritant Dermatitis Irritant dermatitis due to plants can result from direct mechanical injury or chemical contact. See . Mechanical irritant dermatitis Large spines and thorns can cause penetrating trauma, and the wounds can become secondarily infected. Smaller glochids (tufts of short, barbed hairs) embed in the skin like fishhooks. Although (...) pears ( Opuntia species) (see image below) can cause an extremely pruritic, papular eruption called sabra dermatitis, which can easily be confused with scabies or fiberglass dermatitis. Various glochid removal techniques are described, including the use of warm wax, glue, sticking plaster, facial masks, and cellophane tape. Prickly pears, Opuntia species. Chemical irritant dermatitis Several plant families possess chemicals that irritate human skin. One of the most common chemical irritants

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Botanical Dermatology (Treatment)

, and burning may last for 2 hours. Persistent paresthesias may last for more than 12 hours. Most reactions are self-limited and require no treatment. Previous Next: Irritant Dermatitis Irritant dermatitis due to plants can result from direct mechanical injury or chemical contact. See . Mechanical irritant dermatitis Large spines and thorns can cause penetrating trauma, and the wounds can become secondarily infected. Smaller glochids (tufts of short, barbed hairs) embed in the skin like fishhooks. Although (...) pears ( Opuntia species) (see image below) can cause an extremely pruritic, papular eruption called sabra dermatitis, which can easily be confused with scabies or fiberglass dermatitis. Various glochid removal techniques are described, including the use of warm wax, glue, sticking plaster, facial masks, and cellophane tape. Prickly pears, Opuntia species. Chemical irritant dermatitis Several plant families possess chemicals that irritate human skin. One of the most common chemical irritants

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Botanical Dermatology (Overview)

, and burning may last for 2 hours. Persistent paresthesias may last for more than 12 hours. Most reactions are self-limited and require no treatment. Previous Next: Irritant Dermatitis Irritant dermatitis due to plants can result from direct mechanical injury or chemical contact. See . Mechanical irritant dermatitis Large spines and thorns can cause penetrating trauma, and the wounds can become secondarily infected. Smaller glochids (tufts of short, barbed hairs) embed in the skin like fishhooks. Although (...) pears ( Opuntia species) (see image below) can cause an extremely pruritic, papular eruption called sabra dermatitis, which can easily be confused with scabies or fiberglass dermatitis. Various glochid removal techniques are described, including the use of warm wax, glue, sticking plaster, facial masks, and cellophane tape. Prickly pears, Opuntia species. Chemical irritant dermatitis Several plant families possess chemicals that irritate human skin. One of the most common chemical irritants

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Foreign Bodies of the Skin

Removal may not be needed with small asymptomatic inert metal objects Glass All glass is radiopaque, but <2 mm fragments are missed on XRay Glass fragments cause the most foreign body sensations Removal may not be needed with small asymptomatic glass that is difficult to find Pencil leads or graphite Should be removed as much as possible due to secondary ing Wood or vegetative material Must be removed due to infection and inflammation risk Fishhooks See III. Exam Evaluate circulation, sensation (...) Foreign Bodies of the Skin Aka: Foreign Bodies of the Skin , Foreign Body Removal , Splinter Removal , Retained Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. History Mechanism of Injury Bite injuries See or Consider retained tooth fragments and infection risk Broken objects Risk of retained and embedded fragments Sharp objects penetrating shoes, gloves or clothing See Risk of retained cloth, leather or Foreign Body Types Metal Easiest to identify on Xray Lower risk of infection with Retained Foreign Body

2015 FP Notebook

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