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Fever of Unknown Origin History

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1. Assessment of fever of unknown origin in adults

?tool=bestpractice.com A subsequent qualitative definition is less specific as follows: a temperature >38.3°C (>100.9°F) on several separate occasions; an appropriate initial diagnostic work-up (inpatient or outpatient) does not reveal aetiology of fever. Hersch EC, Oh RC. Prolonged febrile illness and fever of unknown origin in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2014 Jul 15;90(2):91-6. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p91.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077578?tool=bestpractice.com Fluctuations (...) , with tuberculosis and intra-abdominal and pelvic abscesses now being more commonly implicated than infective endocarditis. Hersch EC, Oh RC. Prolonged febrile illness and fever of unknown origin in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2014 Jul 15;90(2):91-6. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p91.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077578?tool=bestpractice.com Roth AR, Basello GM. Approach to the adult patient with fever of unknown origin. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Dec 1;68(11):2223-8. https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1201

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Assessment of fever of unknown origin in adults

?tool=bestpractice.com A subsequent qualitative definition is less specific as follows: a temperature >38.3°C (>100.9°F) on several separate occasions; an appropriate initial diagnostic work-up (inpatient or outpatient) does not reveal aetiology of fever. Hersch EC, Oh RC. Prolonged febrile illness and fever of unknown origin in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2014 Jul 15;90(2):91-6. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p91.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077578?tool=bestpractice.com Fluctuations (...) , with tuberculosis and intra-abdominal and pelvic abscesses now being more commonly implicated than infective endocarditis. Hersch EC, Oh RC. Prolonged febrile illness and fever of unknown origin in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2014 Jul 15;90(2):91-6. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p91.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077578?tool=bestpractice.com Roth AR, Basello GM. Approach to the adult patient with fever of unknown origin. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Dec 1;68(11):2223-8. https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1201

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Key diagnostic features of fever of unknown origin: Medical history and physical findings Full Text available with Trip Pro

Key diagnostic features of fever of unknown origin: Medical history and physical findings Fever of unknown origin (FUO) has many possible causes, so detailed history taking and physical examination are required. We identified key diagnostic features of medical history and physical findings for an efficient diagnosis of FUO.A total of 42 consecutive patients (mean age: 50.6±20.3 years) with classic FUO were retrospectively recruited from January 2010 to March 2012. Key diagnostic features were (...) identified from among diagnostic criteria for underlying diseases, indicators for diagnostic tests, and more useful factors for differential diagnosis.The mean number of abnormal findings per patient was 5.8 from taking the history and 2.0 from performing physical examination. In addition, the mean number of key diagnostic features identified was 0.7 (14.0%) from history taking and 0.6 (35.0%) from physical examination. The most relevant key diagnostic feature was arthritis, followed by cervical

2017 Journal of General and Family Medicine

4. Fever Without Source or Unknown Origin-Child

infection. ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 7 Fever Without Source or Unknown Origin—Child Children with neutropenia and FWS often undergo advanced imaging, but there is little evidence-based data about which studies are most efficacious. In their 2002 guidelines (not pediatric specific), the Infectious Diseases Society of America noted that one-half of febrile neutropenic patients with normal chest radiographs will have evidence of pneumonia on chest CT [63]. Archibald et al [36] evaluated (...) —Child References 1. Chinnock R, Butto J, Fernando N. Hot tots: current approach to the young febrile infant. Compr Ther. 1995;21(3):109-114. 2. Baraff LJ. Management of infants and young children with fever without source. Pediatr Ann. 2008;37(10):673-679. 3. Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2007;25(4):1087-1115, vii. 4. Arnow PM, Flaherty JP. Fever of unknown origin. Lancet. 1997;350(9077):575-580. 5. Baraff LJ

2015 American College of Radiology

5. Fever of Unknown Origin History

a Bing search on the term "Fever of Unknown Origin History." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Febrile Illness About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6656 interlinked topic pages divided into a tree of 31 specialty books and 728 chapters. Content is with systematic (...) Fever of Unknown Origin History Fever of Unknown Origin History Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fever of Unknown

2018 FP Notebook

6. Fever of unknown origin: a challenging case Full Text available with Trip Pro

Fever of unknown origin: a challenging case We report a case of Cogan's syndrome presenting as fever of unknown origin in a 31-year-old woman who was admitted to the hospital with a 7-week history of fever, night sweats and other constitutional symptoms. The diagnosis remained elusive despite numerous investigations, and the patient subsequently developed rash, episcleritis, dizziness and sensorineural hearing loss. While initially thought to be a postinflammatory response to a previous

2018 BMJ case reports

7. An unusual cause of fever of unknown origin with enlarged lymph nodes-relapsing polychondritis: A case report. Full Text available with Trip Pro

An unusual cause of fever of unknown origin with enlarged lymph nodes-relapsing polychondritis: A case report. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a common initial presentation leading to a diagnostic challenge.A 3-month history of moderate-to-high fever was reported in an otherwise healthy 54-year-old man. Enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of his chest showed a remarkable progressive enlargement of bilateral cervical, supraclavicular, hilar, and mediastinal lymph nodes within 2 weeks (...) with a gradual tapering in a 4-month follow-up.The patient experienced no relapse of fever and lymph nodes enlargement in the 4-month follow-up.Even though long-term fever with multiple lymphadenectasis usually lead to a diagnosis of lymphoma, the bronchoscopic features and evidence from 18F-FDG PET/CT in this case were much more approximate to RP, indicating an importance of a sensible differential diagnosis of RP in patients who present with nonspecific features such as FUO and lymph nodes enlargement

2017 Medicine

8. Fever of unknown origin and splenomegaly: A case report of blood culture negative endocarditis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Fever of unknown origin and splenomegaly: A case report of blood culture negative endocarditis. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) can be determined by different conditions among which infectious diseases represent the main cause.A young woman, with a history of aortic stenosis, was admitted to our unit for a month of intermittent fever associated with a new diastolic heart murmur and splenomegaly. Laboratory tests were negative for infectious screening. The total body computed tomography (CT) scan

2017 Medicine

9. Mycoplasma Pneumonia: An Unrecognized Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin in an Adult Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mycoplasma Pneumonia: An Unrecognized Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin in an Adult A 26-year-old female was admitted for fever of unknown origin (FUO), headaches, left ankle edema, and a lower extremity rash consistent with erythema nodosum. She had no respiratory symptoms or family history of autoimmune diseases. A chest X-ray was negative for pneumonia or hilar adenopathy. Extensive autoimmune workup was negative. A chest, abdomen, and pelvis computed tomography scan was unremarkable (...) and laboratory studies revealed no source of infection. On hospital day 5, the patient developed a mild productive cough. Her Mycoplasma pneumonia (MP) IgM was high, confirming the diagnosis of MP induced FUO. She was started on azithromycin 500 mg daily and within 24 hours her fevers and headaches resolved. Her left ankle edema and EN gradually improved over a course of a few weeks. This case report highlights the need for MP testing in the evaluation of fever of unknown origin, even in the absence

2017 Case reports in infectious diseases

10. Fever of unknown origin due to intrahepatic wooden toothpick Full Text available with Trip Pro

Fever of unknown origin due to intrahepatic wooden toothpick Ingestion of foreign bodies is a common clinical problem, but intrahepatic migration is an exceptional occurrence. Clinical history is not helpful. Abdominal ultrasonography and CT are fundamental to exclude surgical causes of fever of unknown origin. Laparoscopic segmental liver resection is recommendable to avoid generalized peritonitis.

2017 Clinical Case Reports

11. Fever of Unknown Origin

of Unknown Origin Aka: Fever of Unknown Origin , Fever of Undetermined Origin , Prolonged Febrile Illness , Prolonged Fever From Related Chapters II. Types Classic Fever of Unknown Origin Daily or >= 38.3 C (101 F) Duration for 3 consecutive weeks Qualitative FUO definition does not set an absolute minimum duration No source by clinical evaluation Hospital evaluation for 3 days (previously 7) or Intensive outpatient evaluation for 7 days or Three outpatient visits Daily or >= 38.3 C (101 F) Hospitalized (...) of Unknown Origin." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Fever of Unknown Origin (C0015970) Definition (MSH) Fever in which the etiology cannot be ascertained. Concepts Sign or Symptom ( T184 ) MSH ICD10 , SnomedCT 206758001 , 206764008 , 158162001 , 7520000 English Unknown Origin Fever , Unknown Origin Fevers , PUO Pyrexia of unknown origin , Pyrexia of unknown orig.NOS , Pyrexia of unknown origin NOS , [D

2018 FP Notebook

12. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting as Pyrexia of Unknown Origin, Leukocytosis, and Microangiopathic Haemolytic Anemia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting as Pyrexia of Unknown Origin, Leukocytosis, and Microangiopathic Haemolytic Anemia A 66-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with a florid sepsis-like picture, a two-week history of fever, relative hypotension with end organ ischemia (unexplained liver enzyme and troponin elevations), and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. She was initially found to have a urinary tract infection but, despite appropriate treatment, her fever

2017 Case reports in rheumatology

13. Ulcerative Colitis Activity Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin, in a Patient with Longstanding Disease under Continuous Treatment with Mesalazine Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ulcerative Colitis Activity Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin, in a Patient with Longstanding Disease under Continuous Treatment with Mesalazine Background. The presence of ulcerative colitis (UC) with no bowel symptoms, as fever of unknown origin (FUO), is uncommon. Objective. To describe the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with fever, with a history of UC under treatment with mesalazine. Case Presentation. She was admitted due to fever lasting for 12 days with no associated (...) and mesalazine, as treatment of active UC. Subsequently, the patient's condition improved markedly and the fever retreated. One month later, she was reevaluated with a gallium-67 scintigraphy with total absence of gallium-67 concentration in the ascending colon. Conclusion. UC activity must be included in the differential diagnosis of FUO in patients with longstanding disease, since fever may present alone, with no other manifestations.

2016 Case reports in medicine

14. Secondary malignant giant cell tumor of bone due to malignant transformation 40 years after surgery without radiation therapy, presenting as fever of unknown origin: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

giant cell tumor of bone due to malignant transformation 40 years after surgery without radiation therapy, presenting as fever of unknown origin.A 75-year-old Asian man presented with a 3-week history of continuous pyrexia and left knee pain and swelling. He had been diagnosed at age 35 years with a giant cell tumor of bone of his left distal femur and underwent bone curettage and avascular fibula grafting at that time. Postoperative radiation therapy was not performed. He remained recurrence-free (...) , to the best of our knowledge, of the detection of a secondary malignant giant cell tumor of bone based on fever of unknown origin after long-term (40 years) follow-up. After curettage and bone grafting, giant cell tumor of bone may transform to malignancies within a few years or even decades after surgery. Therefore, meticulous follow-up is essential. The fever might be attributable to the tumor releasing inflammatory cytokines. Not only pain and swelling but also continuous pyrexia may suggest

2016 Journal of medical case reports

15. Assessment of fever in children

. The distinction between patients who have 'fever without source' and 'fever of unknown origin' is important. The vast majority of children who present acutely with fever without source (or fever of unclear source) have underlying infections, typically requiring urgent evaluation and empirical treatment (especially in young children). In contrast, fever of unknown origin is not well defined in children. It has been historically used to describe a subacute presentation of a single illness of at least 3 weeks (...) ' duration during which a fever >38.3°C (100.9°F) is present for most days and the diagnosis is unclear after 1 week of intense investigation. Petersdorf RG, Beeson PB. Fever of unexplained origin: report on 100 cases. Medicine (Baltimore). 1961;40:1-30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13734791?tool=bestpractice.com The most common causes are infections, inflammatory/vasculitic disorders, and malignancies. Chusid MJ. Fever of unknown origin in childhood. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2017;64:205-230. http

2018 BMJ Best Practice

16. Advanced Erosive Gout as a Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin Full Text available with Trip Pro

Advanced Erosive Gout as a Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin A 61-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to a 3-month history of fever of unknown origin, and with right knee and ankle joint pains. At another hospital, extensive investigations had produced negative results, including multiple sterile cultures of blood and joint fluids, and negative autoantibodies. His serum uric acid level was not elevated. However, after admission to our hospital, we performed right knee arthrocentesis (...) , which revealed uric acid crystals. These findings, combined with the results of imaging tests, which showed joint degeneration, led to a diagnosis of advanced erosive gout. After receiving a therapeutic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and a maintenance dose of colchicine for prophylaxis against recurrence, the patient's symptoms subsided and did not return. Advanced erosive gout should be considered a possible cause of fever of unknown origin and diagnostic arthrocentesis should be performed

2015 Korean journal of family medicine

17. Fever of Unknown Origin: A Clinical Approach. Full Text available with Trip Pro

presents a clinical approach. Characteristic history and physical examination findings together with key nonspecific test abnormalities are the basis for a focused clue-directed fever of unknown origin work-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (...) Fever of Unknown Origin: A Clinical Approach. Fevers of unknown origin remain one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges in medicine. Because fever of unknown origin may be caused by over 200 malignant/neoplastic, infectious, rheumatic/inflammatory, and miscellaneous disorders, clinicians often order non-clue-based imaging and specific testing early in the fever of unknown origin work-up, which may be inefficient/misleading. Unlike most other fever-of-unknown-origin reviews, this article

2015 American Journal of Medicine

18. Fever during labor

prophylaxis** should be initiated regardless of whether the patient has a fever: - History of delivery with invasive GBS infection - GBS bacteriuria in the current pregnancy - PROM = 18 hours - Gestational age 38,0 °C after initiation of GBS-prophylaxis, see c) in the red box Flowchart 1 Intrapartum Fever Unknown GBS status * Indications of intrauterine infection: • Foetal tachycardia >160 beats/min • Foul smelling or purulent amniotic fluid • Uterine tenderness or irritation INTRAPARTUM FEVER Temp (...) ) OR febrile) OR pyrexia) OR temperature) OR hyperthermia)) AND ((((((((criteria) OR diagnosed) OR diagnose) OR diagnosis) OR diagnostic) OR define) OR defined) OR definition) 2) 22-10-2017: ((((((("Delivery, Obstetric"[Mesh]) OR "Parturition"[Mesh]) OR "Labor, Obstetric"[Mesh]) OR labor) OR intrapartum)) AND ((maternal) OR mother)) AND temperature 3) 25-10-2017: ((((rectal) AND tympanic) AND "Body Temperature"[Mesh])) AND "Review" [Publication Type] 4) 25-10-2017: ((((rectal) AND oral) AND "Body

2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology

19. Fever of Unknown Origin History

a Bing search on the term "Fever of Unknown Origin History." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Febrile Illness About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6656 interlinked topic pages divided into a tree of 31 specialty books and 728 chapters. Content is with systematic (...) Fever of Unknown Origin History Fever of Unknown Origin History Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fever of Unknown

2015 FP Notebook

20. Papillon-Lèfevre syndrome with palmoplantar keratoderma and periodontitis, a rare cause of pyrexia of unknown origin: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Papillon-Lèfevre syndrome with palmoplantar keratoderma and periodontitis, a rare cause of pyrexia of unknown origin: a case report Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diffuse, transgradient palmoplantar keratoderma, destructive periodontitis beginning in childhood, premature loss of primary teeth, and frequent cutaneous and systemic pyogenic infections. Pyogenic liver abscess is an uncommon presentation of the disease present in this case.A 16 (...) -year-old Punjabi, Pakistani boy presented to the outpatient department of a tertiary-care hospital of Lahore with high-grade fever of 2 months duration. He had been treated for a pyogenic liver abscess 2 years back with antibiotics followed by incision and drainage. He had poor orodental hygiene, palmoplantar keratoderma and periodontitis. His parents had history of consanguinity. His brother and two cousins had similar skin lesions and were edentulous. An orthopentogram showed atrophy

2015 Journal of medical case reports

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