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Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months

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1. Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months

Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Aka: Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months II. Indications Previously well child Febrile child 3 to 36 months without obvious source III. History: Immunization Effects on Occult BacteremiaIncidence e Type B ( ) introduced in U.S. 1985 with high fever dropped from 3-9% to 2-3% Primary cause of changed to (Prenar 7) introduced in U.S. 2000 with high fever dropped from 2-3% to <0.5% (Prenar 13

2018 FP Notebook

2. Fever without focus in children (excluding neonates)

INTRODUCTION 6 ASSESSMENT 6 South Australian Ambulance Service (SAAS) Assessment and Referral: 6 Primary care / outpatient history and examination: 7 Assessment of Toxicity 8 INVESTIGATIONS AND MANAGEMENT OF FEVER WITHOUT FOCUS 9 Investigations all age groups: 9 Infants less than 1 month of age: 9 Infants 1-3 months of age: 10 Children 3 - 36 months 12 Children older than 36 months: 14 Children with chronic medical conditions: 14 APPENDICES 15 REFERENCES 22 ISBN number: 978-1-74243-528-2 Endorsed by: South (...) defined as one week or more). This should be considered as a separate entity from simple fever without a focus, and its investigation and management are not part of the scope of this guideline. Important Points > Children under 36 months with fever should have a bacterial source of infection sought clinically on history and examination > Children at higher risk of serious bacterial infection include: - infants under 3 months of age with temperature =38°C; - infants aged 3-6 months with temperature >39

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

3. Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months

Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer (...) Administration 4 Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months Aka: Fever Without Focus Management 3 to 36 months II. Indications Previously well child Febrile child 3 to 36 months without obvious source III. History: Immunization Effects on Occult BacteremiaIncidence e Type B ( ) introduced in U.S. 1985 with high fever dropped from 3-9% to 2-3% Primary cause of changed to (Prenar 7) introduced in U.S. 2000 with high fever dropped from 2-3% to <0.5% (Prenar 13

2015 FP Notebook

4. Fever Without Focus Red Flags

Flags Fever Without Focus Red Flags Aka: Fever Without Focus Red Flags , Occult Bacteremia Signs in Young Children , Findings Suggestive of Serious Infection in Children Under Age 36 Months , Toxic Findings Suggestive of Occult Bacteremia II. Indications III. Interpretation Positive findings define toxic or ill-appearance and increase risk of All negative findings has of 0.1 (low serious infection risk) Assumes no serious underlying chronic disease No immunosuppression No No No No Assumes no regular (...) Fever Without Focus Red Flags Fever Without Focus Red Flags Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fever Without Focus Red

2018 FP Notebook

5. Fever Without Focus Labs

Without Focus Labs Aka: Fever Without Focus Labs II. Precautions Labs do not triage initial management of infants under 1 month or ill appearing children under 36 months All labs are performed in if under 1 month or ill appearing and under 36 months All infants with these risks are admitted and started on empiric antibiotics and Perform in all children under age 24 months is among the top two causes of serious under 36 months Serious s ( , urosepsis) are increasing in Clean catch, catheterized urine (...) Fever Without Focus Labs Fever Without Focus Labs Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fever Without Focus Labs Fever

2018 FP Notebook

6. British Association of Dermatologists? guidelines for the investigation and management of generalized pruritus in adults without an underlying dermatosis

British Association of Dermatologists? guidelines for the investigation and management of generalized pruritus in adults without an underlying dermatosis GUIDELINES BJD British Journal of Dermatology British Association of Dermatologists’ guidelines for the investigation and management of generalized pruritus in adults without an underlying dermatosis, 2018* G.W.M. Millington iD, 1 A. Collins, 2 C.R. Lovell, 3 T.A. Leslie, 4 A.S.W. Yong, 1 J.D. Morgan, 5 T. Ajithkumar, 6 M.J. Andrews, 7 S.M (...) Haematological causes of GPWOR accountforapproximately2%ofthetotal. 40 Evidence of an underlying haematological disorder may be identi?ed from the history and examination. Aquagenic pruri- tus is characterized by the development of intense itching, without the development of skin lesions, evoked by contact with water. It is characteristic of PV, 36 although there are other causes. Itching at night in association with weight loss, fevers and night sweats is suggestive of lymphoma. 37 Any enlarged lymph nodes

2018 British Association of Dermatologists

7. The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age

The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (...) | Clinical Infectious Diseases | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article navigation 1 October 2011 Article Contents Article Navigation The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America John S

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2011 Infectious Diseases Society of America

8. Fever Without a Focus (Diagnosis)

in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy (...) (20):1437-41. . Baraff LJ, Bass JW, Fleisher GR, et al. Practice guideline for the management of infants and children 0 to 36 months of age with fever without source. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Ann Emerg Med . 1993 Jul. 22(7):1198-210. . Bergman DA, Mayer ML, Pantell RH, Finch SA, Wasserman RC. Does clinical presentation explain practice variability in the treatment of febrile infants?. Pediatrics . 2006 Mar. 117(3):787-95. . Bonadio WA, Hagen E, Rucka J, et al. Efficacy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

9. Fever Without a Focus (Treatment)

. 2008 Feb. 20(1):96-102. . Baker MD, Bell LM, Avner JR. Outpatient management without antibiotics of fever in selected infants. N Engl J Med . 1993 Nov 11. 329(20):1437-41. . Baraff LJ, Bass JW, Fleisher GR, et al. Practice guideline for the management of infants and children 0 to 36 months of age with fever without source. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Ann Emerg Med . 1993 Jul. 22(7):1198-210. . Bergman DA, Mayer ML, Pantell RH, Finch SA, Wasserman RC. Does clinical presentation (...) A. Identifying severe bacterial infection in children with fever without source. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther . 2010 Nov. 8(11):1231-7. . Gomez B, Mintegi S, Rubio MC, Garcia D, Garcia S, Benito J. Clinical and analytical characteristics and short-term evolution of enteroviral meningitis in young infants presenting with fever without source. Pediatr Emerg Care . 2012 Jun. 28(6):518-23. . Grubb NS, Lyle S, Brodie JH, et al. Management of infants and children 0 to 36 months of age with fever without source. J

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

10. Fever Without a Focus (Overview)

in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy (...) (20):1437-41. . Baraff LJ, Bass JW, Fleisher GR, et al. Practice guideline for the management of infants and children 0 to 36 months of age with fever without source. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Ann Emerg Med . 1993 Jul. 22(7):1198-210. . Bergman DA, Mayer ML, Pantell RH, Finch SA, Wasserman RC. Does clinical presentation explain practice variability in the treatment of febrile infants?. Pediatrics . 2006 Mar. 117(3):787-95. . Bonadio WA, Hagen E, Rucka J, et al. Efficacy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

11. Fever Without a Focus (Follow-up)

in fever without focus?. Arch Dis Child . 2007 Apr. 92(4):362-4. . Ishimine P. Fever without source in children 0 to 36 months of age. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2006 Apr. 53(2):167-94. . Ishimine P. The evolving approach to the young child who has fever and no obvious source. Emerg Med Clin North Am . 2007 Nov. 25(4):1087-115, vii. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy CA. Evaluation and management of the febrile infant 60 days of age or younger. Pediatr Ann . 1993 Aug. 22(8):477-80, 482-3. . Jaskiewicz JA, McCarthy (...) (20):1437-41. . Baraff LJ, Bass JW, Fleisher GR, et al. Practice guideline for the management of infants and children 0 to 36 months of age with fever without source. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Ann Emerg Med . 1993 Jul. 22(7):1198-210. . Bergman DA, Mayer ML, Pantell RH, Finch SA, Wasserman RC. Does clinical presentation explain practice variability in the treatment of febrile infants?. Pediatrics . 2006 Mar. 117(3):787-95. . Bonadio WA, Hagen E, Rucka J, et al. Efficacy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

12. 34m with fever, headache and myalgias

34m with fever, headache and myalgias Core IM Hoofbeats: 34M with Fever, Headache and Myalgias – Clinical Correlations Search Core IM Hoofbeats: 34M with Fever, Headache and Myalgias January 16, 2019 15 min read Podcast: | Subscribe: | By Shira Sachs MD, Stephanie Sherman MD, Cindy Fang MD and John Hwang MD || Audio Editing by Richard Chen || Graphic by Amy Ou MD Time Stamps Player three has entered the game! [0:15] Case presentation, part 1 [1:20] First impressions [3:24] Rethinking another (...) provider’s diagnosis [4:36] Interpreting the test of treatment [9:42] Keeping your instincts on a leash? [10:58] Case presentation, part 2 [12:33] Diagnostic schemas [14:30] Our discussant’s differential and the final diagnosis [17:46] Shira’s cognitive autopsy [23:02] Show Notes “ Diagnostic momentum ” refers to our conscious or unconscious tendency to avoid rethinking a diagnosis that has already been “assigned” to a patient. While most diagnoses made by doctors are correct, many are not. Since

2019 Clinical Correlations

13. CRACKCast E167 – Pediatric Fever

CRACKCast E167 – Pediatric Fever CRACKCast E167 – Pediatric Fever - CanadiEM CRACKCast E167 – Pediatric Fever In , by Chris Lipp April 5, 2018 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 166 (9th Ed.), pediatric fever. You will have an excellent approach to this common presentation after listening to this episode. Shownotes: Rosen’s In Perspective When it comes to dealing with pediatric fever, we usually break down kids into four age ranges: 0-28 days 1-3 months 3-36 months > 3 yr (...) . [6] Describe one of: Rochester vs. Philadelphia criteria. Table 166.2: Summary of Major Strategies for the Management of Febrile Infants Younger Than 3 Months Old Philadelphia Rochester Age 29 to 60 days old <60 days old Temperature >100.8° F (38.2° C) >100.4° F (38.0° C) Examination Well, no focus Well, no focus Laboratory values (define low risk) WBCs >15,000/mm 3 WBCs 5000 to 15,000/mm 3 Band/neutrophil ratio <0.2 Absolute band count <1500 UA <10 WBCs/hpf (negative Gram stain) UA <10 WBCs/hpf

2018 CandiEM

14. The Australian guideline for prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

rheumatic fever 13 Diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever 13 Secondary prevention and rheumatic heart disease control 14 Diagnosis and management of rheumatic heart disease 16 2. Primordial and primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease 19 Introduction 19 Primordial prevention 20 Primary prevention 21 The role of non- group A streptococcus 28 Recommendations regarding the primordial and primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease 28 3 (...) . Diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever 30 The importance of accurate diagnosis 30 Diffi culties with diagnosis 30 Current approaches to diagnosis: Jones criteria, WHO criteria and Australian guidelines 30 Clinical features of acute rheumatic fever: major manifestations 33 Clinical features of acute rheumatic fever: minor manifestations 36 Evidence of group A streptococcal infection 38 Differential diagnosis 39 Syndromes that may be confused with acute rheumatic fever 39 Echocardiography

2012 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

15. Diagnosis and management of undifferentiated fever in children. (PubMed)

of concurrent family illnesses, and likelihood of close observation and follow up. Children 6 months-36 months of age with acute onset of fever who appear well and have no observable focus of infection can be evaluated clinically, without laboratory investigation or antibiotic therapy, unless risk factors elevate the likelihood of urinary tract infection.Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (...) for FUO because the problem began with an acute febrile illness or measured temperatures are misidentified as "fevers". A thorough history that reveals myriad symptoms when juxtaposed against normal findings on examination and simple laboratory testing can suggest a diagnosis of "fatigue of deconditioning". "Treatment" is forced return to school, and reconditioning. The management of patients with acute onset of fever without an obvious source or focus of infection is dependent on age. Infants under

2016 Journal of Infection

16. Use of multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by infants and young children aged 6?23 months and children aged 2?12 years

children aged 6–23 months and children aged 2–12 years ISBN 978-92-4-154994-3 © World Health Organization 2016 Some rights reserved. This work is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO licence (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo). Under the terms of this licence, you may copy, redistribute and adapt the work for non-commercial purposes, provided the work is appropriately cited, as indicated below. In any use of this work (...) of multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by infants and young children aged 6–23 months and children aged 2–12 years TABLE OF CONTENTS PUBLICATION HISTORY viii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS viii Financial support viii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 Background 1 Purpose of the guideline 2 Guideline development methodology 2 Available evidence 2 Recommendations 3 Recommendation 1 3 Recommendation 2 4 Remarks 5 Research gaps 6 Plans for updating the guideline 7 WHO GUIDELINE: Use

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

17. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

or acute non-disabling stroke 24 Thrombectomy for people with acute ischaemic stroke 25 Blood pressure control for people with acute intracerebral haemorrhage 28 Optimal positioning for people with acute stroke 30 Early mobilisation for people with acute stroke 30 Decompressive hemicraniectomy for people with acute stroke 31 Context 34 Finding more information and resources 36 Update information 37 Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management (NG128) © NICE 2019 (...) . All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 38This guideline replaces CG68. This guideline is the basis of QS2. Ov Overview erview This guideline covers interventions in the acute stage of a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). It offers the best clinical advice on the diagnosis and acute management of stroke and TIA in the 48 hours after onset of symptoms. Who is it for? Healthcare professionals in primary

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

18. Fever Without Focus Red Flags

Flags Fever Without Focus Red Flags Aka: Fever Without Focus Red Flags , Occult Bacteremia Signs in Young Children , Findings Suggestive of Serious Infection in Children Under Age 36 Months , Toxic Findings Suggestive of Occult Bacteremia II. Indications III. Interpretation Positive findings define toxic or ill-appearance and increase risk of All negative findings has of 0.1 (low serious infection risk) Assumes no serious underlying chronic disease No immunosuppression No No No No Assumes no regular (...) Fever Without Focus Red Flags Fever Without Focus Red Flags Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fever Without Focus Red

2015 FP Notebook

19. Fever Without Focus Labs

Without Focus Labs Aka: Fever Without Focus Labs II. Precautions Labs do not triage initial management of infants under 1 month or ill appearing children under 36 months All labs are performed in if under 1 month or ill appearing and under 36 months All infants with these risks are admitted and started on empiric antibiotics and Perform in all children under age 24 months is among the top two causes of serious under 36 months Serious s ( , urosepsis) are increasing in Clean catch, catheterized urine (...) Fever Without Focus Labs Fever Without Focus Labs Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fever Without Focus Labs Fever

2015 FP Notebook

20. Guidelines for diagnosing and managing pediatric concussion

or damage arising from any claims made by a third party. Also, as the sponsor of this document, the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation assumes no responsibility or liability whatsoever for changes made to the guidelines without its consent. Any changes must be accompanied by the statement: “Adapted from Guidelines for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion with/without permission,” according to whether or not permission was sought and/or given. About the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation The Ontario (...) and managing recovery at home, school and play. The target population is every child/adolescent aged 5 to 18 years who has or may have sustained a concussion in the previous month. These guidelines do not apply to children under 5 years. Diagnosing concussion in children under five years is controversial because it relies heavily on the child’s ability to recognize and/or communicate his/her symptoms. Most preschoolers have not developed that capacity yet. As well, there are no validated tools for this age

2019 CPG Infobase

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