How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

859 results for

Fetal Foot Measurement

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

141. A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of sensory, psychological and behavioural interventions for managing agitation in older adults with dementia

Professor Jane Norman Professor of Maternal and Fetal Health, University of Edinburgh, UK Professor John Powell Consultant Clinical Adviser, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), UK Professor James Raftery Professor of Health Technology Assessment, Wessex Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, UK Dr Rob Riemsma Reviews Manager, Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd, UK Professor Helen Roberts Professor of Child Health Research, University College London, UK Professor (...) and exclusion criteria 7 Data extraction 8 Quality assessment 8 Power 9 Reliability and validity of outcome measures 9 Randomised controlled trials 9 Blinding 9 Appropriate statistical methods 9 Follow-up rates 10 Risk of bias 10 Individual study level 10 Across the studies 10 Categorisation of the intervention 11 Level of agitation 12 Data synthesis 12 Meta-analysis 12 Standard effect sizes 12 Chapter 4 Results 15 Details of included and excluded studies 15 Findings of the review 15 Interventions

2014 NIHR HTA programme

142. Donor Human Milk Banks

of the withdrawal of two pasteurization machines from service due to fluctuations in quality control. Up to 40% of milk did not meet current standards and was discarded. Because of this high rejection rate, the milk bank could not provide a stable supply of donor human milk to its clients. The processing and distribution of donor human milk is anticipated to resume in 2015, once corrective measures ensure that a continuous supply of product can be provided. Donor recruitment activities, as well (...) for shipping and storage containers is permissible, but it is illegal to sell human milk in Canada. 14 The Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network is the largest online resource of its kind, with localized milk-sharing networks in all 13 Canadian provinces and territories. 46 Eats on Feets is another milk-sharing network with chapters in Alberta, Manitoba, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Nova Scotia, Yukon, and Newfoundland and Labrador. 47 Both networks encourage families to make informed

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Environmental Scanning

143. Pruning Emtree: Does Focusing Embase Subject Headings Impact Search Strategy Precision and Sensitivity?

(such as mental health and public health), focusing the intervention Emtree terms led to reductions in both sensitivity and precision. In the latter case we are likely to see a large impact on the performance measures from reducing the effectiveness of one strategy in one review. Overall these findings suggest that focusing Emtree headings is likely to reduce already suboptimal sensitivity for only small gains in precision. If it can be ascertained that a strategy is highly sensitive then focusing

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

144. Reducing the Risk - Thrombosis and Embolism during Pregnancy and the Puerperium

and consideration given to antenatal anti-Xa monitoring and the potential for antithrombin replacement at initiation of labour or prior to caesarean section. [New 2015] If anti-Xa levels are measured, a test that does not use exogenous antithrombin should be used and 4-hour peak levels of 0.5–1.0 iu/ml aimed for. [New 2015] Other heritable thrombophilic defects are lower risk and can be managed with standard doses of thromboprophylaxis. [New 2015] Acquired thrombophilia – see also section 4.4 Women with VTE (...) . [New 2015] Previous recurrent VTE What extra advice is needed for women with previous recurrent VTE? Advice regarding doses of LMWH in pregnancy should be sought from a clinician with expertise in haemostasis and pregnancy. [New 2015] Some women with previous recurrent VTE require higher doses of LMWH. [New 2015] Women on long-term warfarin or other oral anticoagulants should be counselled about the risks of these agents to the fetus (see section 8.6) and advised to stop their oral anticoagulant

2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

145. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

with spinal cord injury 248 9.2 Simple analgesics for the treatment of migraine 266 9.3 Table of triptans 267 9.4 Pooled effectiveness data from emergency department studies of the treatment of migraine 296 10.1 Acute pain intensity measurement tools — neonates 344 10.2 Composite scales for infants and children 345 10.3 Self-report tools for children 346 11.1 ADEC drug categorisation according to fetal risk 387 11.2 Categorisation of drugs used in pain management 388 11.3 The breastfeeding patient (...) AND MEASUREMENT OF PAIN AND ITS TREATMENT 35 2.1 Assessment 35 2.2 Measurement 36 2.2.1 Unidimensional measures of pain 37 2.2.2 Functio nal impact of acute pain 39 2.2.3 Multidi mensional measures of pain 39 2.2.4 Patients with special needs 40 2.3 Outcome measures in acute pain management 41 2.3.1 Outcome measures 41 References 43xii Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence CONTENTS 3. PROVISION OF SAFE AND EFFECTIVE ACUTE PAIN MANAGEMENT 47 3.1 Education 47 3.1.1 Patients 47 3.1.2 Staff 48 3.2

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

146. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

and is occasionally associated with mast cell leukemia; cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is often confined to the skin throughout its course. Overall, 10% of leukemias and lymphomas have prominent expression in the skin.[ ] Epidermal appendages are also found in the dermal compartment. These are derivatives of the epidermal keratinocytes, such as hair follicles, sweat glands, and the sebaceous glands associated with the hair follicles. These structures are generally formed in the first and second trimesters of fetal (...) ,[ - ] craniopharyngiomas,[ ] fetal rhabdomyomas,[ ] leiomyomas,[ ] mesenchymomas,[ ] basaloid follicular hamartomas,[ ] and nasal dermoid tumors. Development of meningiomas and ependymomas occurring postradiation therapy has been documented in the general pediatric population; radiation therapy for syndrome-associated intracranial processes may be partially responsible for a subset of these benign tumors in individuals with BCNS.[ - ] In addition, radiation therapy of malignant medulloblastomas in the BCNS population

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

147. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

and undiagnosed conditions detected by screening and surveillance measures.[ ] Figure 2. Cumulative incidence of chronic health conditions for (A) grades 3 to 5 chronic health conditions, (B) multiple grade 3 to 5 conditions in survivors, (C) multiple grade 3 to 5 conditions in siblings, (D) conditioned based on no previous grade 3 to 5 conditions among survivors by ages 25, 35, or 45, and (E) conditioned based on no previous grade 3 to 5 conditions among siblings by ages 25, 35, or 45. Gregory T. Armstrong (...) insurance appears to play an important role in risk-based survivor care.[ , ] Lack of access to health insurance affects the following: Cancer-related visits. In the CCSS, uninsured survivors were less likely than those privately insured to report a cancer-related visit (adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75–0.91) or a cancer center visit (adjusted RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71–0.98). Uninsured survivors had lower levels of utilization in all measures of care than privately insured survivors

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

148. CCS/CPCA Position Statement on Pulse Oximetry Screening in Newborns to Enhance Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease Full Text available with Trip Pro

that test 1 foot alone or sequentially the right hand and either foot. Differences in saturations of > 3% between the right hand and either foot is also abnormal (> 2 SD of measurement variability). x 17 De Wahl Granelli, A., Mellander, M., Sunnegardh, J., Sandberg, K., and Ostman-Smith, I. Screening for duct-dependant congenital heart disease with pulse oximetry: a critical evaluation of strategies to maximize sensitivity. Acta Paediatr . 2005 ; 94 : 1590–1596 | | Many types of CCHD require a patent (...) ductus arteriosus to secure adequate systemic or pulmonary blood flow, and the degree of right to left shunting across the ductus arteriosus will result in different saturations in preductal (right hand) and postductal (either foot) sites. Use of the left hand for pulse oximetry is not recommended because of its proximity to the ductus arteriosus. Because both feet are postductal, checking either foot is adequate. Although a meta-analysis did not show a significant difference in sensitivity ( P

2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

149. Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures

for the monitor- ing and management of pediatric patients during and after sedation for a procedure. 53–58 The purpose of this updated report is to unify the guidelines for sedation used by medical and dental practitioners; to add clarifications regarding moni- toring modalities, particularly regarding continuous expired carbon dioxide measurement; to provide updated information from the medical and dental literature; and to suggest methods for further improvement in safety and outcomes. This docu- ment uses (...) ). Sedation and anesthesia in a nonhospital environment (e.g., private physician’s or dental office, free- standing imaging facility) historically have been associated with an increased incidence of “failure to rescue” from adverse events, because these settings may lack immediately available backup. Immediate activation of emergency medical services (EMS) may be required in such settings, but the practitioner is responsible for life-support measures while awaiting EMS arrival. 63,214 Rescue techniques

2016 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

150. Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

are most commonly coarctation of the aorta (coarctation is more proximal and affects longer segments), complex aortic arch anomalies, and ventricular and atrial septal defects. - E ye abnormalities. Ophthalmologic anomalies can include microphthalmos, retinal vascular abnormalities, persistent fetal retinal vessels, exophthalmos, coloboma, and optic nerve atrophy. These abnormalities are rare and occur in 7% to 10% of patients.[ ] Diagnosis of PHACE requires clinical examination, cardiac evaluation (...) cardiac and pulmonary assessment and measurement of heart rate and blood pressure. - Consensus was not reached regarding the need for pretreatment electrocardiogram; however, two studies found no contraindication to beta-blocker therapy in 6.5% to 25% of patients who had electrocardiogram abnormalities.[ , ] Electrocardiogram should be considered in children with heart rate lower than normal for age and history of arrhythmia or arrhythmia detected during examination. - Family history of congenital

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

151. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

surveillance study. The British Journal of Psychiatry. [ ] Primary evidence No new randomized controlled trials published in the major journals since 1 February 2018. New policies New policies No new national policies or guidelines since 1 February 2018. New safety alerts New safety alerts No new safety alerts since 1 February 2018. Changes in product availability Changes in product availability No changes in product availability since 1 February 2018. Goals and outcome measures Goals and outcome measures (...) Goals Goals To support primary healthcare professionals to: Suspect, assess and detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in young people and adults. Ensure appropriate referral to specialist teams for confirmation of the diagnosis and initiation of treatment, where appropriate. Monitor, liaise with, and support the person and their carers in primary care, where appropriate. Outcome measures Outcome measures No outcome measures were found during the review of this topic. Audit criteria

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

152. Hypertension - not diabetic

or clinic diastolic blood pressure at least 110 mmHg. Primary hypertension has no identifiable cause (about 90% of people). Secondary hypertension has a known underlying cause (about 10% of people). 'White coat' hypertension is BP that is unusually raised when measured during consultations with clinicians. Same-day admission should be arranged if a person has: Blood pressure higher than 180/110 mmHg with signs of papilloedema and/or retinal haemorrhage (accelerated hypertension). Suspected (...) in adults from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Text changes include updates on blood pressure measurement, the use of ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring, modified blood pressure targets, and antihypertensive drug treatments. Issued in April 2012. July 2011 — minor update. Included cough as a very rare, but possible adverse effect of candesartan. This information is based on the updated Summary of Product Characteristics for Amias®. Issued in September 2011. May 2011

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

153. Urticaria

. Changes in product availability Changes in product availability No changes in product availability since 1 March 2017. Goals and outcome measures Goals and outcome measures Goals Goals To support primary healthcare professionals to: Diagnose urticaria. Determine the cause of urticaria where possible. Manage a person with urticaria. Provide information and education on urticaria for the person and/or their parents/carers. Appropriately refer people who require further assessment and/or specialist (...) or secondary care treatment. Outcome measures Outcome measures No outcome measures were found during the review of this topic. Audit criteria Audit criteria No audit criteria were found during the review of this topic. QOF indicators QOF indicators No QOF indicators were found during the review of this topic. QIPP - Options for local implementation QIPP - Options for local implementation No QIPP indicators were found during the review of this topic. NICE quality standards NICE quality standards No NICE

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

154. Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis

Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis - NICE CKS Share Angio-oedema and anaphylaxis: Summary Angio-oedema is swelling of deep dermis, subcutaneous, or submucosal tissue, often affecting the face (lips, tongue, and eyelids), genitalia, hands, or feet. Less commonly, submucosal swelling affects the bowel and airway. The main types are allergic angio-oedema, non-allergic drug reaction (usually caused by angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor treatment), hereditary angio (...) fluid challenge; and monitoring of the pulse, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and ECG. Following initial resuscitation, slow IM or IV chlorphenamine and hydrocortisone should be given. Nebulized salbutamol or ipratropium should be considered if the person is wheezy. Following emergency treatment for anaphylaxis, the person should be offered: Referral to a specialist allergy service. Two adrenaline auto-injectors as an interim measure before their specialist allergy service appointment (and advice

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

155. Corticosteroids - topical (skin), nose, and eyes

amount of topical corticosteroid that should be applied to adults, for each area of the body, is listed in Table 4. Table 4. Amount of topical preparation (in finger-tip units [FTUs]) for different areas of an adult's body. Body area Number of FTUs Scalp 3 Face and neck 2.5 One hand (front and back including fingers) 1 One arm (including entire hand) 4 Elbows (large plaque) 1 Both soles of feet 1.5 One foot (dorsum and sole) including toes 1.5 One leg (including entire foot) 8 Buttocks 4 Knees (large (...) that, as with other nasal corticosteroids, it should not be used in pregnancy or lactation unless the potential benefit to the woman justifies any potential risk to the woman and the fetus or infant [ ]. The manufacturer of Flixonase® (fluticasone propionate) recommends that the possible benefits of the drug is weighed against the possible hazards before using it in pregnancy or breastfeeding [ ; ]. Administration of corticosteroids to pregnant animals can cause abnormalities of fetal development (including cleft

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

156. Nausea/vomiting in pregnancy

thromboembolism. Fetal — possible higher incidence of low birthweight babies (if hyperemesis gravidarum). Laboratory investigations are not required in uncomplicated cases, but a minority of women, for whom symptoms are more severe, will require further assessment. Management includes: Asking about the nausea and vomiting (for example onset, duration, frequency, effect of food, associated symptoms, co-existing conditions, and effect of mood and quality of life). If nausea or vomiting is affecting fluid (...) in product availability Changes in product availability Xonvea is licensed for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who do not respond to conservative management. For more information see . Goals and outcome measures Goals and outcome measures Goals Goals To support primary healthcare professionals to: Reassure the woman that nausea and vomiting are normal in pregnancy. Reduce the symptoms of nausea and vomiting. Reduce time off work and other lifestyle disruptions caused

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

157. Chickenpox

, usually about 5 days after the onset of the rash. The virus persists in sensory nerve ganglia of the dorsal root. Years later, it can reactivate and cause herpes zoster (shingles). Chickenpox is usually a self-limiting disease in healthy children. Complications include: Bacterial skin infection, most common in young children. Lung involvement, more common in adults. In pregnancy, severe maternal chickenpox and fetal varicella syndrome. In later pregnancy, varicella can result in neonatal chickenpox (...) subjects from the age of 9 months. See . Goals and outcome measures Goals and outcome measures Goals Goals To support primary healthcare professionals to: Accurately diagnose chickenpox. Advise on self-care and infection control for people with chickenpox. Minimize the severity and duration of chickenpox symptoms. Reduce the likelihood of complications of chickenpox. Admit to hospital, refer, or seek specialist advice as appropriate. Outcome measures Outcome measures No outcome measures were found

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

158. Alopecia, androgenetic - male

policies or guidelines since 1st July 2016. New safety alerts New safety alerts No new safety alerts since 1st July 2016. Changes in product availability Changes in product availability No changes in product availability since 1st July 2016. Goals and outcome measures Goals and outcome measures Goals Goals To support primary healthcare professionals to: Diagnose androgenetic alopecia in men. Offer appropriate initial and subsequent management in primary care. Refer men with androgenetic alopecia, when (...) appropriate, to dermatology or mental health services, as needed. Outcome measures Outcome measures No outcome measures were found during the review of this topic. Audit criteria Audit criteria No audit criteria were found during the review of this topic. QOF indicators QOF indicators No QOF indicators were found during the review of this topic. QIPP - Options for local implementation QIPP - Options for local implementation No QIPP indicators were found during the review of this topic. NICE quality

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

159. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

Psychiatry 2014, 14(Suppl 1):S1 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-244X/14/S1/S1 Page 8 of 83no functional impairment in fully recovered patients as measured by a scale such as the Sheehan Disability Scale or SF-36 [32,119,120]. Objective scales can be used to help assess a patient’s progress. The Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale is brief, comprehensive, and can easily be used at each appointment to assess improvement. The clinician-rated Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) can assess anxi- ety (...) was significantly favored over medications for the treatment of panic disorder in a meta-analysis [71]. In a meta-analysis of 42 studies, expo- sure and combinations of exposure, cognitive restructur- ing and other CBT techniques had the most consistent evidence of efficacy for the treatment of panic disorder [56]. Strategies that included exposure were the most effective for panic measures. For measures of agorapho- bia, combined strategies were more effective than single techniques, which did not result

2014 CPG Infobase

160. CRACKCast E011 – Neonatal Resuscitation

, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, Respirations 4) What is the management of meconium? Meconium in amniotic fluid = sign of fetal distress in utero Previous guidelines recommended routine suctioning of non-vigorous neonates that had meconium stained amniotic fluid However, thinking has changed: Tracheal suctioning only if: absent or depressed respirations (gasping, poor oxygenation) poor muscle tone HR < 100 bpm usually need two passes of ETT guided suctioning: intubate child and place suction catheter (...) ) redistribution of cardiac output to provide lung perfusion because: the fetal lung is poorly perfused due to vasoconstriction (only 40% of the RV cardiac output goes to the lung) most to the pulm. artery → ductus arteriosus → descending aorta At birth baby breathes → alveolar oxygen decreases pulmonary vascular resistance the fetal shunt through the ductus arteriosus closes (due to increased systemic vascular resistance) shunt usually closes by 15 hrs of age after shunt closes all the RV output goes

2016 CandiEM

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>