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Fecal Incontinence

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1. Sacral neuromodulation versus onabotulinumtoxinA for refractory urgency urinary incontinence: impact on fecal incontinence symptoms and sexual function

Sacral neuromodulation versus onabotulinumtoxinA for refractory urgency urinary incontinence: impact on fecal incontinence symptoms and sexual function Sacral Neuromodulation Versus onabotulinumtoxinA for Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence: Impact on Fecal Incontinence Symptoms and Sexual Function - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search (...) : Name must be less than 100 characters Choose a collection: Unable to load your collection due to an error Add Cancel Add to My Bibliography My Bibliography Unable to load your delegates due to an error Add Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Am J Obstet Gynecol Actions , 221 (5), 513.e1-513.e15 Nov 2019 Sacral Neuromodulation Versus onabotulinumtoxinA for Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence: Impact on Fecal Incontinence Symptoms and Sexual Function

2020 EvidenceUpdates

2. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management

training 53 Absorbent containment products 54 Medicines for overactive bladder 55 Botulinum toxin type A injection 56 Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence 57 Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management (NG123) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 3 of 72Assessing pelvic organ prolapse 59 Non-surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse 60 Surgical management of pelvic (...) (or certainty) of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off-label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding. 1.1 Organisation of specialist services L Local multidisciplinary teams ocal multidisciplinary teams 1.1.1 Local multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) for women with primary stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder or primary prolapse should: review the proposed treatment for all women

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

3. Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, there was considerable uncertainty about the effect on faecal incontinence in the late postnatal period (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.13 to 4.21; 1 trial, 107 women, very low-quality evidence).There was little evidence about effects on urinary or faecal incontinence beyond 12 months' postpartum. There were few incontinence-specific quality of life data and little consensus on how to measure it. We found no data on health economics outcomes.Targeting continent antenatal women early in pregnancy and offering a structured PFMT (...) Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women. About one-third of women have urinary incontinence and up to one-tenth have faecal incontinence after childbirth. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth for both prevention and treatment of incontinence.This is an update of a review previously published in 2012.To determine the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle

2017 Cochrane

4. Biofeedback for women with urinary, fecal or combined incontinence

Biofeedback for women with urinary, fecal or combined incontinence Biofeedback for women with urinary, fecal or combined incontinence Biofeedback for women with urinary, fecal or combined incontinence Rodríguez B, García Martí S, Pichon-Riviere A, Augustovski F, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ciapponi A, López A, Rey-Ares L Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Rodríguez B, García Martí S, Pichon-Riviere A, Augustovski F, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, Ciapponi A, López A, Rey-Ares L. Biofeedback for women with urinary, fecal or combined incontinence. Buenos Aires: Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS). Documentos de Evaluación de Tecnologías Sanitarias, Informe de Respuesta Rapida No 518. 2017 Authors' objectives To assess the available evidence on the efficacy, safety and coverage related aspects regarding the use

2017 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

5. The management of urinary incontinence in women

, menstrual blood, faeces) can be considered tapu. It is important to keep things that are tapu, or restricted, separate from things that are noa, or unrestricted. In many cases, these concepts align with good health and safety practice. History-taking and physical examination • At the initial clinical assessment, categorise the woman’s urinary incontinence (UI) as stress UI (SUI), mixed UI, or urgency UI/overactive bladder (OAB). Start initial treatment on this basis. In mixed UI, direct treatment (...) Assessment of pelvic floor muscles 6 Bladder diaries 6 Absorbent products, urinals and toileting aids 6 Indwelling urethral catheters 6 General principles when using overactive bladder (OAB) medicines 7 Choosing OAB medicines 7 Surgical approaches for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) 7 The multidisciplinary team (MDT) 7 Maintaining and measuring surgical expertise and standards for practice 7 1. Recommendations 8 1.1 Assessment and investigation 8 1.2 Lifestyle interventions 11 1.3 Physical therapies 11

2019 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

6. Urinary incontinence in women

Urinary incontinence in women Urinary incontinence in women - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Urinary incontinence in women Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Involuntary, spontaneous urine loss that occurs either with strenuous physical activity (stress incontinence) or is associated with an uncontrollable sense of urgency (urge incontinence), or both (mixed incontinence (...) or tenderness nocturia abnormal bulbocavernosus and wink reflexes weakened sphincter tone chronic heart failure diabetes mellitus excess fluid intake post-void dribbling haematuria history of recurrent urinary tract infections enlarged uterus faecal impaction loss of perineal sensation increasing age white ethnicity pregnancy obesity post-menopausal status functional impairment lower urinary tract symptoms long-term residence in a care facility dementia family history of incontinence childhood enuresis

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Urinary incontinence in women

Urinary incontinence in women Urinary incontinence in women - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Urinary incontinence in women Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: September 2018 Summary Involuntary, spontaneous urine loss that occurs either with strenuous physical activity (stress incontinence) or is associated with an uncontrollable sense of urgency (urge incontinence), or both (mixed incontinence (...) or tenderness nocturia abnormal bulbocavernosus and wink reflexes weakened sphincter tone chronic heart failure diabetes mellitus excess fluid intake post-void dribbling haematuria history of recurrent urinary tract infections enlarged uterus faecal impaction loss of perineal sensation increasing age white ethnicity pregnancy obesity post-menopausal status functional impairment lower urinary tract symptoms long-term residence in a care facility dementia family history of incontinence childhood enuresis

2018 BMJ Best Practice

8. Urinary stress incontinence and other maternal outcomes 2 years after caesarean or vaginal birth for twin pregnancy: a multicentre randomised trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Urinary stress incontinence and other maternal outcomes 2 years after caesarean or vaginal birth for twin pregnancy: a multicentre randomised trial Does planned caesarean compared with planned vaginal birth lower the risk of problematic urinary stress, faecal, or flatal incontinence?Women between 320/7 and 386/7 weeks of gestation with a twin pregnancy were randomised to planned caesarean or planned vaginal birth.The trial took place at 106 centres in 25 countries.A total of 2305 of the 2804 (...) women enrolled in the study completed questionnaires at 2 years (82.2% follow-up): 1155 in the planned caesarean group and 1150 in the planned vaginal birth group.A structured self-administered questionnaire completed at 2 years postpartum.The primary maternal outcome of the Twin Birth Study was problematic urinary stress, or fecal, or flatal incontinence at 2 years RESULTS: Women in the planned caesarean group had lower problematic urinary stress incontinence rates compared with women

2018 EvidenceUpdates

9. Urinary Incontinence

)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint terminology and classification of the complications related directly to the insertion of prostheses (meshes, implants, tapes) and grafts in female pelvic floor surgery. Neurourol Urodyn, 2011. 30: 2. 21. Brown, J.S., et al. Measurement characteristics of a voiding diary for use by men and women with overactive bladder. Urology, 2003. 61: 802. 22. Nygaard, I., et al. Reproducibility of the seven-day voiding diary in women with stress urinary incontinence. Int (...) elderly Japanese women with stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence: a randomized controlled trial. Int J Nurs Stud, 2011. 48: 1165. 137. Dowd, T.T., et al. Fluid intake and urinary incontinence in older community-dwelling women. J Community Health Nurs, 1996. 13: 179. 138. Hashim, H., et al. How should patients with an overactive bladder manipulate their fluid intake? BJU Int, 2008. 102: 62. 139. Zimmern, P., et al. Effect of fluid management on fluid intake and urge incontinence in a trial

2019 European Association of Urology

10. Axonics sacral neuromodulation system for overactive bladder and faecal incontinence

2 of 13multidisciplinary team for specialist urological assessment and management. At this stage, investigations may be done to confirm the presence and involvement of detrusor overactivity, before offering invasive therapy such as SNM. Alternative third-line treatment options include injecting botulinum into the bladder wall, and irreversible surgical procedures such as bladder reconstruction (augmentation cystoplasty), and urinary diversion. NICE's guideline on faecal incontinence in adults (...) for use in overactive bladder syndrome and faecal incontinence. The inno innovativ vative aspects e aspects are that it is currently the only rechargeable sacral neuromodulation system and is designed to need less frequent surgical replacement than current non- rechargeable systems. The intended place in ther place in therap apy y is as an alternative to non-rechargeable sacral neuromodulation devices in people with urinary or faecal dysfunction, who would be offered sacral neuromodulation in line

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

11. Faecal incontinence in children

faecal soiling or diarrhoea constipation peri-anal skin irritation abnormal rectal examination spinal deformities weakness and decreased or absent reflexes behaviour problems painful bowel movements abdominal pain/cramping posturing described as tightening of buttocks enuresis anorectal malformation abnormal abdominal examination history of underlying medical condition chronic constipation male sex age: 5 to 6 years diet lacking in fibre inadequate fluid intake delayed or inadequate toilet training (...) Faecal incontinence in children Faecal incontinence in children - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Faecal incontinence in children Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: February 2019 Summary Involuntary defecation at inappropriate times, occurring after the typical age of completed toilet training (generally 4 years). In most cases, caused by overflow soiling associated with chronic constipation

2019 BMJ Best Practice

12. Urinary Incontinence

)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint terminology and classification of the complications related directly to the insertion of prostheses (meshes, implants, tapes) and grafts in female pelvic floor surgery. Neurourol Urodyn, 2011. 30: 2. 21. Brown, J.S., et al. Measurement characteristics of a voiding diary for use by men and women with overactive bladder. Urology, 2003. 61: 802. 22. Nygaard, I., et al. Reproducibility of the seven-day voiding diary in women with stress urinary incontinence. Int (...) elderly Japanese women with stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence: a randomized controlled trial. Int J Nurs Stud, 2011. 48: 1165. 137. Dowd, T.T., et al. Fluid intake and urinary incontinence in older community-dwelling women. J Community Health Nurs, 1996. 13: 179. 138. Hashim, H., et al. How should patients with an overactive bladder manipulate their fluid intake? BJU Int, 2008. 102: 62. 139. Zimmern, P., et al. Effect of fluid management on fluid intake and urge incontinence in a trial

2018 European Association of Urology

13. Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Systematic Review Update

Abbreviations: AE = adverse events, Imp = improvement, MBSR = mindfulness-based stress reduction, PFMT = pelvic floor muscle therapy, QoL = quality of life, Sat = satisfaction, TENS = transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (including transvaginal, surface, and related electric stimulation used to treat UI), UI = urinary incontinence. * The categorization of different interventions was based on recommendations from The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and American Urological (...) provide the conclusions from the overall analyses (of all studies regardless of UI type) and compare these findings with data specifically from the studies that included only women with a given UI type (stress or urgency). Data were sparse regarding the effect of interventions specifically in women with mixed urinary incontinence; the results of these studies are summarized briefly. Separate findings are summarized for treatment of stress UI, urgency UI, and mixed UI. Summary findings focus on 1

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

14. Faecal incontinence in adults

, Marshall RJ, et al. The prevalence of fecal incontinence in community-dwelling adults: a systematic review of the literature. Dis Colon Rectum. 2004 Aug;47(8):1341-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15484348?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam obstetric trauma presence of other risk factors patulous anus weak squeeze pressure constipation urinary incontinence urgency passive leakage faecal seepage perineal scarring perianal fistulae rectal mass rectal prolapse abnormal perianal sensation female (...) . For those who do not respond to conservative treatment, investigation by a consultant specialist is recommended to determine underlying aetiology. Surgical options include anterior sphincter repair and neosphincter formation. Definition Faecal incontinence is the involuntary passage of flatus or faeces. The underlying aetiology is often complex with multiple possible contributing factors including anorectal structural abnormalities, neurological disorders, cognitive or behavioural dysfunction, stool

2018 BMJ Best Practice

15. Faecal incontinence in children

faecal soiling or diarrhoea constipation peri-anal skin irritation abnormal rectal examination spinal deformities weakness and decreased or absent reflexes behaviour problems painful bowel movements abdominal pain/cramping posturing described as tightening of buttocks enuresis anorectal malformation abnormal abdominal examination history of underlying medical condition chronic constipation male sex age: 5 to 6 years diet lacking in fibre inadequate fluid intake delayed or inadequate toilet training (...) Faecal incontinence in children Faecal incontinence in children - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Faecal incontinence in children Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: February 2019 Summary Involuntary defecation at inappropriate times, occurring after the typical age of completed toilet training (generally 4 years). In most cases, caused by overflow soiling associated with chronic constipation

2018 BMJ Best Practice

16. Faecal incontinence in adults

, Marshall RJ, et al. The prevalence of fecal incontinence in community-dwelling adults: a systematic review of the literature. Dis Colon Rectum. 2004 Aug;47(8):1341-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15484348?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam obstetric trauma presence of other risk factors patulous anus weak squeeze pressure constipation urinary incontinence urgency passive leakage faecal seepage perineal scarring perianal fistulae rectal mass rectal prolapse abnormal perianal sensation female (...) . For those who do not respond to conservative treatment, investigation by a consultant specialist is recommended to determine underlying aetiology. Surgical options include anterior sphincter repair and neosphincter formation. Definition Faecal incontinence is the involuntary passage of flatus or faeces. The underlying aetiology is often complex with multiple possible contributing factors including anorectal structural abnormalities, neurological disorders, cognitive or behavioural dysfunction, stool

2018 BMJ Best Practice

19. A Quality-of-Life Comparison of Two Fecal Incontinence Phenotypes: Isolated Fecal Incontinence Versus Concurrent Fecal Incontinence With Constipation. (Abstract)

constipation.This was a prospective cohort study. Survey data, including Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, Constipation Severity Instrument, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life survey (categorized as lifestyle, coping, depression, and embarrassment), Pelvic Organ Prolapse Inventory and Urinary Distress Inventory surveys, and anorectal physiology testing were obtained.The study was conducted as a single-institution study from January 2007 to January 2017.Study patients had fecal incontinence presented (...) with constipation had higher rates of coexisting pelvic organ prolapse (Pelvic Organ Prolapse Inventory: 18.4 vs 8.2; p < 0.01), higher rates of urinary incontinence (Urinary Distress Inventory: 30.2 vs 23.4; p = 0.01), and higher pressure findings on manometry; intussusception on defecography was common. Patients with fecal incontinence with concurrent constipation had less severe incontinence scores at presentation (21.0 vs 23.8; p < 0.001) and yet lower overall health satisfaction (28.9% vs 42.5%; p < 0.001

2018 Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

20. Double-blind randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus sham electrical stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence: CONtrol of Faecal Incontinence using Distal NeuromodulaTion (the CONFIDeNT trial)

Double-blind randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus sham electrical stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence: CONtrol of Faecal Incontinence using Distal NeuromodulaTion (the CONFIDeNT trial) Double-blind randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus sham electrical stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence: CONtrol of Faecal Incontinence using Distal NeuromodulaTion (the CONFIDeNT trial) Double-blind (...) randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus sham electrical stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence: CONtrol of Faecal Incontinence using Distal NeuromodulaTion (the CONFIDeNT trial) Horrocks EJ, Bremner SA, Stevens N, Norton C, Gilbert D, O'Connell PR, Eldridge S, Knowles CH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

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