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Febrile Seizure

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1. Evaluation of Long-term Risk of Epilepsy, Psychiatric Disorders, and Mortality Among Children With Recurrent Febrile Seizures: A National Cohort Study in Denmark (Abstract)

Evaluation of Long-term Risk of Epilepsy, Psychiatric Disorders, and Mortality Among Children With Recurrent Febrile Seizures: A National Cohort Study in Denmark Febrile seizures occur in 2% to 5% of children between the ages of 3 months and 5 years. Many affected children experience recurrent febrile seizures. However, little is known about the association between recurrent febrile seizures and subsequent prognosis.To estimate the risk of recurrent febrile seizures and whether (...) there is an association over long-term follow-up between recurrent febrile seizures and epilepsy, psychiatric disorders, and death in a large, nationwide, population-based cohort in Denmark.This population-based cohort study evaluated data from all singleton children born in Denmark between January 1, 1977, and December 31, 2011, who were identified through the Danish Civil Registration System. Children born in Denmark who were alive and residing in Denmark at age 3 months were included (N = 2 103 232). The study

2019 EvidenceUpdates

2. Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Dravet syndrome

having fewer nights with seizures, when there is a higher risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. The patient and carer expert considered that reducing the duration of convulsive seizures and the frequency of other seizure types would improve the quality of life of people with Dravet syndrome. The committee concluded that there is an unmet need for treatments that reduce the number and duration of convulsive seizures, and that patients and their carers would value a new treatment option (...) convulsive seizures were less likely to die from epilepsy-related causes, and people taking cannabidiol were more likely to be free from convulsive seizures. The company used an Cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Dravet syndrome (TA614) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 16 of 25observational study of people with epilepsy (Trinka et al. 2013) to model a 58% reduction in risk

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

3. Epilepsy and seizures in young people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: Prevalence and links with other neurodevelopmental disorders. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Epilepsy and seizures in young people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: Prevalence and links with other neurodevelopmental disorders. The true prevalence of epileptic seizures and epilepsy in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is unknown, because previous studies have relied on historical medical record review. Associations of epilepsy with other neurodevelopmental manifestations (eg, specific psychiatric diagnoses) remain unexplored.The primary caregivers of 108 deletion carriers (mean age (...) screen on the epilepsy questionnaire was more likely in deletion carriers with lower performance IQ (odds ratio [OR] 0.96, P = 0.018), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (OR 3.28, P = 0.021), autism symptoms (OR 3.86, P = 0.004), and indicative motor coordination disorder (OR 4.56, P = 0.021).Even when accounting for deletion carriers diagnosed with epilepsy, reports of seizures and seizurelike symptoms are common. These may be "true" epileptic seizures in some cases, which

2019 Epilepsia

4. First-ever convulsive seizures in children presenting to the emergency department: risk factors for seizure recurrence and diagnosis of epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

to the PED with first-ever convulsive seizures represent a heterogeneous group. The identification of prognostic factors for recurrence and epilepsy diagnosis may help provide tailored counselling and follow-up.Seizures were 'unprovoked' in 19.4% and 'provoked' in 80.6% of children presenting to the emergency department. At 4-year follow-up, 37.9% relapsed, and 13.6% received a diagnosis of epilepsy. 'Unprovoked' first seizure, family history of febrile seizures, and pre-existing neurological conditions (...) First-ever convulsive seizures in children presenting to the emergency department: risk factors for seizure recurrence and diagnosis of epilepsy. Aetiologies of first-ever convulsive seizures may be diverse, not all leading to recurrence or epilepsy diagnosis. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of first-ever convulsive seizures in children, investigating risk factors for recurrence and epilepsy diagnosis.This was a retrospective study of children presenting with a first-ever convulsive

2018 Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

6. Overview of seizure disorder

) seizures occurring more than 24 hours apart One unprovoked (or reflex) seizure and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after 2 unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years Diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal, generalised, or unknown onset, with subcategories of motor, non-motor (absence), with retained or impaired awareness for focal seizures. Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational (...) intervention. EEG shows bisynchronous epileptiform activity in both cerebral hemispheres. Berg AT, Berkovic SF, Brodie MJ, et al. Revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies: report of the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology, 2005-2009. Epilepsia. 2010;51:676-685. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20196795?tool=bestpractice.com GTCS occur in many different types of epilepsy. Anti-epileptic agents are the primary treatment for all types. Bergey GK. Evidence

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Mutations in GABRB3: From febrile seizures to epileptic encephalopathies. Full Text available with Trip Pro

with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs.We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3 probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. Electrophysiologic analysis of 7 mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes (...) Mutations in GABRB3: From febrile seizures to epileptic encephalopathies. To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes.We performed massive parallel sequencing of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy

2017 Neurology

8. Duration of Anti-convulsant Therapy for Acute Symptomatic Seizure in Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

Enrollment : 60 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Intervention Model Description: Whether 4 weeks anti-epileptic drug is as efficacious as 12 weeks anti-epileptic drug therapy for Acute Encephalitis syndrome Masking: None (Open Label) Masking Description: Open label study Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Comparison of 4 Weeks Versus 12 Weeks Anti-convulsant Therapy for Acute Symptomatic Seizure in Children With Acute Encephalitis Syndrome- Open Label (...) Duration of Anti-convulsant Therapy for Acute Symptomatic Seizure in Acute Encephalitis Syndrome Duration of Anti-convulsant Therapy for Acute Symptomatic Seizure in Acute Encephalitis Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2017 Clinical Trials

9. X-linked focal epilepsy with reflex bathing seizures: Characterization of a distinct epileptic syndrome. (Abstract)

X-linked focal epilepsy with reflex bathing seizures: Characterization of a distinct epileptic syndrome. We recently reported a Q555X mutation of synapsin 1 (SYN1) on chromosome Xp11-q21 in a family segregating partial epilepsy and autistic spectrum disorder. Herein, we provide a detailed description of the epileptic syndrome in the original family.A total of 34 members from a large French-Canadian family were evaluated. Family members with seizures or epilepsy underwent (when possible (...) affected members showed rhythmic theta activity over temporal head regions. Ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed temporoinsular perfusion changes. Detailed neuropsychological assessments revealed that SYN1 Q555X male mutation carriers showed specific language impairment and mild autistic spectrum disorder. Female carriers also exhibited reading impairments and febrile seizures but no chronic epilepsy.Available evidence suggests that impaired SYN1 function is associated

2015 Epilepsia

10. Febrile seizure

?tool=bestpractice.com The 2006 report by the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force on Classification and Terminology of Epilepsy and Epileptic Syndromes proposed a change in terminology and the omission of the words 'convulsion' and 'convulsive'. They suggested that the term 'febrile convulsions' be replaced by 'febrile seizures'. Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: position paper of the ILAE (...) Febrile seizure Febrile seizure - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Febrile seizure Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Febrile seizures are usually self-limiting; an increased risk of developing epilepsy is low except in a small number of cases. Most febrile seizures resolve spontaneously and quickly, and do not require acute or long-term anticonvulsant treatment. Definition

2019 BMJ Best Practice

11. Simple febrile seizures in a child. First-choice treatments

% of febrile seizures in children are classified as "complex" and require specific treatment by an emergency medical service as well as hospitalisation in order to investigate the cause. A complex seizure presents at least one of the following features: duration of more than 15 minutes; recurrence within 24 hours; partial seizure , i.e. with convulsions affecting only part of the body, without loss of consciousness; neurological disorder following the seizure. Situations in which there is a risk (...) -choice treatments FEATURED REVIEW Febrile seizures occur in around 3% of children. What are the essential points for healthcare professionals to keep in mind? And what are the warning signs to look out for? Full review (4 pages) available for download by subscribers. A simple febrile seizure is defined as an episode of generalised seizures lasting less than 15 minutes and occurring only once in 24 hours in a child during a febrile episode, without intracranial infection, metabolic disorders

2019 Prescrire

12. Febrile seizure

?tool=bestpractice.com The 2006 report by the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force on Classification and Terminology of Epilepsy and Epileptic Syndromes proposed a change in terminology and the omission of the words 'convulsion' and 'convulsive'. They suggested that the term 'febrile convulsions' be replaced by 'febrile seizures'. Fisher RS, Cross JH, French JA, et al. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: position paper of the ILAE (...) Febrile seizure Febrile seizure - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Febrile seizure Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Febrile seizures are usually self-limiting; an increased risk of developing epilepsy is low except in a small number of cases. Most febrile seizures resolve spontaneously and quickly, and do not require acute or long-term anticonvulsant treatment. Definition

2018 BMJ Best Practice

13. Prescribing regular drugs to prevent febrile convulsions risks more harm than benefit

convulsions are fits that can occur when a young child (aged six months to six years) has a fever. Around 2 to 4% of children will have a febrile convulsion, with a third of those children going on to have another when feverish in the future. Most convulsions last under five minutes and the child may feel sleepy for a while afterwards. Simple febrile convulsions, by definition, are harmless and not a sign of serious brain disease, so can be managed with basic first aid such as putting the child (...) on the effectiveness and safety of preventative drugs. What did this study do? This systematic review and meta-analysis included 30 randomised or quasi-randomised trials that compared drugs given continuously or intermittently to prevent febrile convulsions with each other, placebo or no treatment in 4,256 children. The included trials evaluated the anti-epileptic drugs phenobarbitone, phenytoin and valproate; benzodiazepines diazepam and clobazam (sedatives); antipyretics (to reduce fever) paracetamol, ibuprofen

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

15. EEG for children with complex febrile seizures. Full Text available with Trip Pro

EEG for children with complex febrile seizures. Febrile seizures can be classified as simple or complex. Complex febrile seizures are associated with fever that lasts longer than 15 minutes, occur more than once within 24 hours, and are confined to one side of the child's body. It is common in some countries for doctors to recommend an electroencephalograph (EEG) for children with complex febrile seizures. A limited evidence base is available to support the use of EEG and its timing after (...) complex febrile seizures among children.To assess the use of EEG and its timing after complex febrile seizures in children younger than five years of age.For the latest update of this review, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (23 January 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 23 January 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 23 January 2017), and ClinicalTrials.gov (23 January 2017). We applied no language

2017 Cochrane

16. Prophylactic drug management for febrile seizures in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prophylactic drug management for febrile seizures in children. Febrile seizures occurring in a child older than one month during an episode of fever affect 2% to 4% of children in Great Britain and the United States and recur in 30%. Rapid-acting antiepileptics and antipyretics given during subsequent fever episodes have been used to avoid the adverse effects of continuous antiepileptic drugs.To evaluate primarily the effectiveness and safety of antiepileptic and antipyretic drugs used (...) prophylactically to treat children with febrile seizures; but also to evaluate any other drug intervention where there was a sound biological rationale for its use.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 7); MEDLINE (1966 to July 2016); Embase (1966 to July 2016); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) (July 2016). We imposed no language restrictions. We also contacted researchers in the field to identify continuing

2017 Cochrane

17. Study of a group of children who initially had convulsions associated with fever and later developed epileptic attacks in the absence of pyrexia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Study of a group of children who initially had convulsions associated with fever and later developed epileptic attacks in the absence of pyrexia 21032523 2012 10 02 2011 04 04 1468-2044 50 4 1975 Apr Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Study of a group of children who initially had convulsions associated with fever and later developed epileptic attacks in the absence of pyrexia. 331 eng Journal Article England Arch Dis Child 0372434 0003-9888 2010 10 30 6 0 1975 4 1 0 0 1975 4 1

1975 Archives of Disease in Childhood

18. Cannabidiol in patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (GWPCARE4): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial. (Abstract)

Cannabidiol in patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (GWPCARE4): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial. Patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a rare, severe form of epileptic encephalopathy, are frequently treatment resistant to available medications. No controlled studies have investigated the use of cannabidiol for patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. We therefore assessed the efficacy and safety of cannabidiol (...) as an add-on anticonvulsant therapy in this population of patients.In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial done at 24 clinical sites in the USA, the Netherlands, and Poland, we investigated the efficacy of cannabidiol as add-on therapy for drop seizures in patients with treatment-resistant Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Eligible patients (aged 2-55 years) had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, including a history of slow (<3 Hz) spike-and-wave patterns on electroencephalogram, evidence of more than

2018 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

19. Acetaminophen and Febrile Seizure Recurrences During the Same Fever Episode Full Text available with Trip Pro

Acetaminophen and Febrile Seizure Recurrences During the Same Fever Episode To confirm the safety of using acetaminophen for febrile seizures (FSs) and to assess its efficacy in preventing FS recurrence during the same fever episode.In this single-center, prospective, open, randomized controlled study, we included children and infants (age range: 6-60 months) with FSs who visited our hospital between May 1, 2015, and April 30, 2017. The effectiveness of acetaminophen was examined by comparing (...) the recurrence rates of patients in whom rectal acetaminophen (10 mg/kg) was administered every 6 hours until 24 hours after the first convulsion (if the fever remained >38.0°C) to the rates of patients in whom no antipyretics were administered. No placebo was administered to controls. The primary outcome measure was FS recurrence during the same fever episode.We evaluated 423 patients; of these, 219 were in the rectal acetaminophen group, and 204 were in the no antipyretics group. In the univariate analysis

2018 EvidenceUpdates

20. Chiari 1 Malformation in a Child with Febrile Seizures, Parasomnias, and Sleep Apnea Syndrome Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chiari 1 Malformation in a Child with Febrile Seizures, Parasomnias, and Sleep Apnea Syndrome The type I is the most common Chiari malformation in children. In this condition, the lower part of the cerebellum, but not the brain stem, extends into the foramen magnum at the base of the skull leading to disturbances in cerebrospinal fluid circulation and to direct compression of nervous tissue.We describe a 4-year-old Caucasian female child with febrile seizures, headache, parasomnias, and a delay (...) of speech. The child underwent a magnetic resonance imaging to investigate these neurological signs, disclosing a Chiari malformation type 1. The polysomnography showed a mild-moderate sleep-disordered breathing, increased number of central sleep apneas, and generalized spike waves at sleep onset.Seizures have been seldom described in CM1 patients. The main reasons for performing MRI in this case were frequent seizures, a delay of speech, and headache, leading to an unexpected diagnosis of CM1

2017 Case reports in pediatrics

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