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Family Psychosocial Screening

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161. The role of family physicians in cancer care: perspectives of primary and specialty care providers (PubMed)

Canada.The participants-21 fps, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 general practitioners in oncology-were asked to describe both the role that fps currently play and the role that, in their opinion, fps should play in the future care of cancer patients across the cancer continuum. Participants identified 3 key roles: coordinating cancer care, managing comorbidities, and providing psychosocial care to patients and their families. However, fps and specialists discussed many (...) The role of family physicians in cancer care: perspectives of primary and specialty care providers Currently, the specific role of family physicians (fps) in the care of people with cancer is not well defined. Our goal was to explore physician perspectives and contextual factors related to the coordination of cancer care and the role of fps.Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted telephone interviews with 58 primary and cancer specialist health care providers from across

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2017 Current Oncology

162. Do sleep disturbances mediate the association between work-family conflict and depressive symptoms among nurses? A cross-sectional study (PubMed)

Do sleep disturbances mediate the association between work-family conflict and depressive symptoms among nurses? A cross-sectional study Nurses are at a high risk for work-family conflict due to long and irregular work hours and multiple physical and psychosocial stressors in their work environment. Nurses report higher rates of depressive symptoms than the general public, leading to a high rate of burnout, absenteeism, and turnover. Work-family conflict is associated with negative consequences (...) on the mental health of nurses. Healthcare organizations should incorporate mental health services as part of their Employee Assistance Program for nurses and include psychological and sleep disorders screening, counseling, and follow-up.Introduction Depression has been identified as the leading cause of disability worldwide. Nurses report higher rates of depression than the general public. Work-family conflict is challenging for nurses and may lead to depression and poor health. However, the mechanisms

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2017 Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing

163. The search for relevant outcome measures for cost-utility analysis of systemic family interventions in adolescents with substance use disorder and delinquent behavior: a systematic literature review (PubMed)

considerations, economic aspects have gained attention. However, conventional generic quality of life measures used in health economic evaluations may not be able to capture the broad effects of systemic interventions. This study aims to identify existing outcome measures, which capture the broad effects of systemic family interventions, and allow use in a health economic framework.We based our systematic review on clinical studies in the field. Our goal was to identify effectiveness studies of psychosocial (...) , accessibility, psychometric properties, etc.One thousand three hundred seventy-eight articles were found and screened for eligibility. Eighty articles were selected, 8 instruments were identified covering 5 or more systems.The systematic review identified instruments from the clinical field suitable to evaluate systemic family interventions in a health economic framework. None of them had preference-weights available. Hence, a next step could be to attach preference-weights to one of the identified

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2017 Health and quality of life outcomes

164. Program for Screening and Prevention of Eating Disorders in Obese Young People in Vulnerable Neighborhoods of Marseille: an Action Research

Program for Screening and Prevention of Eating Disorders in Obese Young People in Vulnerable Neighborhoods of Marseille: an Action Research Program for Screening and Prevention of Eating Disorders in Obese Young People in Vulnerable Neighborhoods of Marseille: an Action Research - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study (...) Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Program for Screening and Prevention of Eating Disorders in Obese Young People in Vulnerable Neighborhoods of Marseille: an Action Research The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care

2017 Clinical Trials

165. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for opioid and other substance use during infertility treatment. (PubMed)

infertility, complicate pregnancy, increase medical problems, and lead to psychosocial difficulties for the woman and her family. The reproductive endocrinologist thus has an ethical and medical duty to screen for substance use, provide initial counseling, and refer to specialized treatment as needed. This article provides an overview of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), a public health approach shown to be effective in ameliorating the harms of substance use.Copyright © (...) Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for opioid and other substance use during infertility treatment. Opioid use and misuse have reached epidemic proportions in the United States, especially in women of childbearing age, some of whom seek infertility treatments. Substance use is much more common than many of the conditions routinely screened for during the preconception period, and it can have devastating consequences for the woman and her family. Substance use can worsen

2017 Fertility and Sterility

166. Cancer Screening Recommendations for Individuals with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. (PubMed)

be offered cancer surveillance as soon as the clinical or molecular LFS diagnosis is established. Specifically, the panel recommends adoption of a modified version of the "Toronto protocol" that includes a combination of physical exams, blood tests, and imaging. The panel also recommends that further research be promoted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of these risk-adapted surveillance and cancer prevention strategies while addressing the psychosocial needs of individuals and families (...) Cancer Screening Recommendations for Individuals with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited condition caused by germline mutations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene encoding p53, a transcription factor triggered as a protective cellular mechanism against different stressors. Loss of p53 function renders affected individuals highly susceptible to a broad range of solid and hematologic cancers. It has recently become evident that children and adults

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2017 Clinical Cancer Research

167. Persistent low back pain: Can screening predict risk?

generally assess characteristics of an individual’s pain experience (including pain intensity and functional impairment) and psychosocial factors known to have prognostic relevance (e.g. beliefs, catastrophisation, anxiety and depression). Recent guidelines (e.g. [4]) recommend their use to guide LPB management in primary care. The uncertainty surrounding the prognostic performance of available screening instruments instigated this ,[5] recently published in BMC Medicine . We asked: when adults consult (...) Persistent low back pain: Can screening predict risk? Can screening predict the risk of having persistent low back pain? Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain Persistent low back pain: Can screening predict risk? February 21, 2017 by Almost everyone will experience low back pain (LBP). Most of us also know someone who has persistent LBP – pain that comes and goes, or never goes; that limits work, or life or enjoyment. When our own back hurts we worry (a little or a lot

2017 Body in Mind blog

168. Neonatal Hearing Screening in Assiut Hospital

congenital anomalies . It has been shown to be greater than that of most other diseases and syndromes (eg, phenylketonuria, sickle cell disease) screened at birth . Data from the newborn hearing-screening programs in Rhode Island, Colorado, and Texas showed that 2-4 of every 1000 neonates have hearing loss. Early Intervention at or before 6 months of age allows a child with impaired hearing to develop normal speech and language, alongside his or her hearing peers and can prevent severe psychosocial (...) Neonatal Hearing Screening in Assiut Hospital Neonatal Hearing Screening in Assiut Hospital - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Neonatal Hearing Screening in Assiut Hospital The safety

2017 Clinical Trials

169. Increasing Colorectal and Breast Cancer Screening in Women

, Menon U, Loehrer P, Vance G, Skinner CS. Validation of scales to measure benefits and barriers to colorectal cancer screening. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology. 2001;19(3/4):47-63. Rawl S, Champion V, Menon U, Loehrer P, Vance G, Hunter C, et al. Differences on health beliefs by stage of readiness to screen for colorectal cancer among first-degree relatives of affected individuals. Ann Behav Med. 2001;23(Supplement):S202. Menon U. Factors associated with colorectal cancer screening in an average (...) Increasing Colorectal and Breast Cancer Screening in Women Increasing Colorectal and Breast Cancer Screening in Women - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Increasing Colorectal and Breast Cancer

2017 Clinical Trials

170. Development and Validation of an Automated Measurement of Child Screen Media Use: FLASH

College of Medicine Collaborators: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) William Marsh Rice University Seattle Children's Hospital Information provided by (Responsible Party): Teresia O'Connor, Baylor College of Medicine Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Children's screen media use has been identified as a prominent cause for sedentary time that has been linked to obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as other unwanted physiologic, psychosocial (...) them to develop a first of its kind, in-home, unobtrusive, automatic, privacy preserving screen use monitoring system: Family Level Assessment of Screen use in the Home (FLASH) that uses an embedded computing platform connected to a video camera on larger, stationary screens (FLASH-TV); or functions as a background app using a front facing camera (FLASH-Mobile). The trans-disciplinary group, consisting of behavioral researchers at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and electrical engineers at Rice

2017 Clinical Trials

171. Validation of the STarT Back Screening Tool in the Military

Validation of the STarT Back Screening Tool in the Military Validation of the STarT Back Screening Tool in the Military - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Validation of the STarT Back Screening (...) Information provided by (Responsible Party): Dan Rhon, Brooke Army Medical Center Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a trial to validate the use of the STarT Back Screening Tool (SBST) in the Military Health System for patients with low back pain presenting to primary care. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Low Back Pain Lumbago Radiculopathy Intervertebral Disc Disorder Procedure: Risk Stratified Care Procedure: Usual Care Not Applicable Detailed Description

2017 Clinical Trials

172. Optimizing Clinical Screening and Management of Maternal Mental Health: Predicting Women at Risk for Perinatal Depression

will include baseline participant medical, psychological and family history, blood biomarkers, and psychosocial assessments. Condition or disease Depression Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Observational Estimated Enrollment : 300 participants Observational Model: Cohort Time Perspective: Prospective Official Title: Optimizing Clinical Screening and Management of Maternal Mental Health: Predicting Women at Risk for Perinatal Depression Actual Study Start Date : April 14 (...) Optimizing Clinical Screening and Management of Maternal Mental Health: Predicting Women at Risk for Perinatal Depression Optimizing Clinical Screening and Management of Maternal Mental Health: Predicting Women at Risk for Perinatal Depression - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum

2017 Clinical Trials

173. Cancer Predisposition Cascade Screening for Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer and Lynch Syndromes in Switzerland: Study Protocol (PubMed)

records and determine their current cancer status and surveillance practices, needs for coordination of medical care, psychosocial needs, patient-provider and patient-family communication, quality of life, and willingness to serve as advocates for cancer genetic services to blood relatives, (2) survey first- and second-degree relatives and first-cousins identified from pedigrees or family history records of HBOC and LS index cases and determine their current cancer and mutation status, cancer (...) surveillance practices, needs for coordination of medical care, barriers and facilitators to using cancer genetic services, psychosocial needs, patient-provider and patient-family communication, quality of life, and willingness to participate in a study designed to increase use of cancer genetic services, and (3) explore the influence of patient-provider communication about genetic cancer risk on patient-family communication and the acceptability of a family-based communication, coping, and decision

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2017 JMIR Research Protocols

174. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world (PubMed)

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children's early media experiences involves (...) four principles: minimizing, mitigating, mindfully using and modelling healthy use of screens. Knowing how young children learn and develop informs best practice strategies for health care providers.

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2017 Paediatrics & child health

175. The Signal-Trial: Evaluation of a Screening Tool for Psychosocial Problems in Cancer Genetics

The Signal-Trial: Evaluation of a Screening Tool for Psychosocial Problems in Cancer Genetics The Signal-Trial: Evaluation of a Screening Tool for Psychosocial Problems in Cancer Genetics - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one (...) or more studies before adding more. The Signal-Trial: Evaluation of a Screening Tool for Psychosocial Problems in Cancer Genetics The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01562431 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : March 23, 2012 Last Update Posted : January 24, 2014 Sponsor

2011 Clinical Trials

176. Socio-demographic, psychosocial and home-environmental attributes associated with adults' domestic screen time. (PubMed)

Socio-demographic, psychosocial and home-environmental attributes associated with adults' domestic screen time. Sedentary behaviors (involving prolonged sitting time) are associated with deleterious health consequences, independent of (lack of) physical activity. To inform interventions, correlates of prevalent sedentary behaviors need to be identified. We examined associations of socio-demographic, home-environmental and psychosocial factors with adults' TV viewing time and leisure-time (...) psychosocial and environmental factors in specific population subgroups might be most effective to reduce domestic screen time.

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2011 BMC Public Health

177. Technical report: ethical and policy issues in genetic testing and screening of children

literature on the psychosocial and clini- cal effects of genetic testing and screening can help inform us about best practices regarding diagnostic genetic testing, phar- macogenetics, newborn screening, carrier screening, testing asymptomatic children for genetic conditions that present later in childhood or adulthood, and how to respond to direct-to- consumer testing and the potential of genomic profiling. Genetic testing and screening of minors are commonplace. “Genetic screening” denotes assays (...) undertaken on a popula- tion-wide basis to identify at-risk individuals. “Genetic testing” denotes assays designed to provide a definitive diagnosis; these are performed because of positive screening results, family his- tory, ethnicity, physical stigmata, or other reasons. Every year, approximately 4 million infants in the United States undergo newborn screening with state-chosen panels of rare metabolic, hematologic, and endocrine abnormalities for which early treatment may prevent or reduce morbidity

2013 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics

178. Screening, referral and treatment for depression in patients with coronary heart disease

Screening, referral and treatment for depression in patients with coronary heart disease Screening, referral and treatment for depression in patients with coronary heart disease | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect person_outline Login (...) keyboard_arrow_down Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close Screening, referral and treatment for depression in patients with coronary heart disease David M Colquhoun, Stephen J Bunker, David M Clarke, Nick Glozier, David L Hare, Ian B Hickie, James Tatoulis, David R Thompson, Geoffrey H Tofler, Alison Wilson and Maree G Branagan Med J Aust 2013; 198 (9): 483-484. || doi: 10.5694/mja13.10153 Published online: 20 May 2013 Topics Summary In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia

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2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

179. Assessing Psychosocial Risk in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Validation of the Psychosocial Assessment Tool 2.0_General. (PubMed)

Assessing Psychosocial Risk in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Validation of the Psychosocial Assessment Tool 2.0_General. The aim of this study was to present the preliminary psychometric properties of the Psychosocial Assessment Tool 2.0_General (PAT2.0_GEN), a brief screener for psychosocial risk in families of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).Caregivers of 42 youth with IBD were recruited and administered a battery of measures including the PAT2.0_GEN and well-validated (...) of the PAT2.0_GEN. Baseline PAT2.0_GEN was also significantly correlated with youth-reported Child Behavior Checklist total scores at baseline (r=0.37, P=0.02) but not at the 6-month follow-up (r=0.23, P=0.17).A number of indicators support the concurrent and predictive utility of the PAT2.0_GEN. The PAT2.0_GEN is a promising tool for screening psychosocial risk that could facilitate the provision of psychosocial services to those patients most in need.

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2013 Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

180. Educational and Psychological Interventions to Improve Outcomes for Recipients of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators and Their Families

, Council on Clinical Cardiology, and Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young Originally published 24 Sep 2012 Circulation. 2012;126:2146–2172 You are viewing the most recent version of this article. Previous versions: Abstract Significant mortality benefits have been documented in recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs); however, the psychosocial distress created by the underlying arrhythmia and its potential treatments in patients and family members may be underappreciated (...) by clinical care teams. The disentanglement of cardiac disease and device-related concerns is difficult. The majority of ICD patients and families successfully adjust to the ICD, but optimal care pathways may require additional psychosocial attention to all ICD patients and particularly those experiencing psychosocial distress. This state-of-the-science report was developed on the basis of an analysis and critique of existing science to (1) describe the psychological and quality-of-life outcomes after

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2012 American Heart Association

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