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Family Psychosocial Screening

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141. Screening for bipolar depression in family medicine practices: prevalence and clinical correlates. (PubMed)

Screening for bipolar depression in family medicine practices: prevalence and clinical correlates. To compare individuals in primary care (PC) who screen positive for bipolar depression to those who screened positive for unipolar depression on mental health care ouctomes, PC service utilization, medical comorbidities, suicidal ideation, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychosocial functioning.In this cross-sectional study, participants (N=1197) answered self-reported measures (...) with bipolar depression were more likely to endorse suicidal ideation, present with more medical comorbidities, report a worse physical HRQoL and have a higher rate of PC services utilization as compared to participants who screened positive for unipolar depression. Only six (10.9%) participants were recognized by the general practitioner as having a diagnosis of bipolar depression.The cross-sectional design prevents firm causal inferences from being drawn. A positive screen for BD does not substantiate

2014 Journal of Affective Disorders

142. Telephone versus in-person colorectal cancer risk and screening intervention for first-degree relatives: A randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

who were not mutation carriers for known hereditary cancer syndromes, but who were considered to be at an increased risk based on family history. It was hypothesized that both telephone and in-person approaches would increase CRC knowledge, screening adherence, perceived risk accuracy, and psychosocial functioning compared with controls. The authors anticipated greater satisfaction with the in-person approach. CRC knowledge, risk perception, psychosocial functioning, and intention to screen were (...) Telephone versus in-person colorectal cancer risk and screening intervention for first-degree relatives: A randomized controlled trial. Having a first-degree relative (FDR) with colorectal cancer (CRC) is a significant risk factor for CRC. Counseling for FDRs regarding CRC risk factors and personalized risk is important to improve knowledge and screening compliance.A 3-arm randomized controlled trial compared tailored in-person and telephone CRC counseling interventions with controls among FDRs

2019 Cancer

143. Screening for depression in women during pregnancy or the first year postpartum and in the general adult population: a protocol for two systematic reviews to update a guideline of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. (PubMed)

Screening for depression in women during pregnancy or the first year postpartum and in the general adult population: a protocol for two systematic reviews to update a guideline of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. In 2018, the World Health Organization reported that depression is the most common cause of disability worldwide, with over 300 million people currently living with depression. Depression affects an individual's physical health and well-being, impacts psychosocial (...) functioning, and has specific negative short- and long-term effects on maternal health, child health, developmental trajectories, and family health. The aim of these reviews is to identify evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for depression in the general adult population and in pregnant and postpartum women.Search strategies were developed and tested through an iterative process by an experienced medical information specialist in consultation with the review team. We will search MEDLINE

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2019 Systematic reviews

144. Oncogenetic testing and follow-up for women with familial breast/ovarian cancer, Li Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome

history suggesting a hereditary risk of breast cancer, referral to a centre of human genetics specialised in cancer genetics for counselling and testing should be considered, whether the woman is affected by breast cancer or not. If not affected, it is advisable that the referring physician asks the unaffected patient to refer an affected family member if possible. If possible, the genetic testing of a family should usually start with the testing of an affected individual (mutation searching/screening (...) cancer 13 ? Annual screening with ultrasound of the thyroid gland could be considered, starting at age 18 y. 6 ? Because data regarding lifetime risk of endometrial cancer are limited, surveillance screening (ultrasound and/or endometrial biopsy has been suggested to begin at age 35–40 or 5 years before the earliest endometrial cancer in the family) 6 and surgical intervention (hysterectomy) should be on an individual basis. ? Colonoscopy can be considered, starting at age 35 y, then every 5-10 y

2015 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

145. Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2

, approximately 500 families have been reported worldwide. 1, 2 3 Recommendations ? Referral to a specialist genetics clinic for counselling and testing should be considered based on personal and family history, whether the individual is affected or not. ? If possible, genetic testing for a family should usually start with the testing of an affected individual (mutation searching/screening) to try to identify a mutation in the relevant gene. ? Patients should be considered as a case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (...) Oncogenetic testing, diagnosis and follow-up in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome and neurofibromatosis 1 and 2 2015 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 243Cs SUMMARY ONCOGENETIC TESTING, DIAGNOSIS AND FOLLOW-UP IN BIRT- HOGG-DUBÉ SYNDROME, FAMILIAL ATYPICAL MULTIPLE MOLE MELANOMA SYNDROME AND NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1 AND 2 2015 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 243Cs GOOD CLINICAL PRACTICE SUMMARY ONCOGENETIC TESTING, DIAGNOSIS AND FOLLOW-UP IN BIRT- HOGG-DUBÉ SYNDROME

2015 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

146. Negotiating policy in practice: child and family health nurses' approach to the process of postnatal psychosocial assessment. (PubMed)

Negotiating policy in practice: child and family health nurses' approach to the process of postnatal psychosocial assessment. There is growing recognition internationally of the need to identify women with risk factors for poor perinatal mental health in pregnancy and following birth. In the state of New South Wales, Australia the Supporting Families Early policy provides a framework of assessment and support for women and families and includes routine psychosocial assessment and depression (...) screening. This study investigated the approach taken by Child and Family Health Nurses (CFHNs) following birth to assessment and screening as recommended by state policy. This was a qualitative ethnographic study that included 83 CFHN and 20 women. Observations occurred with thirteen nurses; with 20 women, in the home or the clinic environment. An additional 70 nurses participated in discussion groups. An observational tool (4D&4R) and field notes were used to record observations and analysed

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2013 BMC Health Services Research

147. Digging over that old ground: an Australian perspective of women's experience of psychosocial assessment and depression screening in pregnancy and following birth. (PubMed)

Digging over that old ground: an Australian perspective of women's experience of psychosocial assessment and depression screening in pregnancy and following birth. There is increasing recognition of the need to identify risk factors for poor mental health in pregnancy and following birth. In New South Wales, Australia, health policy mandates psychosocial assessment and depression screening for all women at the antenatal booking visit and at six to eight weeks after birth. Few studies have (...) explored in-depth women's experience of assessment and how disclosures of sensitive information are managed by midwives and nurses. This paper describes women's experience of psychosocial assessment and depression screening examining the meaning they attribute to assessment and how this influences their response.This qualitative ethnographic study included 34 women who were observed antenatally in the clinic with 18 midwives and 20 of the same women who were observed during their interaction with 13

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2013 BMC Women's Health

148. Sport pre-participation screening for asymptomatic atlanto-axial instability (AAI) in Down Syndrome (DS) patients

history and neurological examination of DS patients should be undertaken by an appropriately qualified medical professional or chartered physiotherapist (6) (4), with the preference for the professional to be someone who cares for the patient regularly, on an ongoing basis and is therefore aware of their baseline function (6), e.g. General Practitioner (GP)/Family Physician. Selby et al (10) conclude that both plain x-ray and physical examination are insensitive for screening for AAI in DS patients (...) pre-participation screening should have 3 questions asked as per the British Gymnastics programme and a neurological and neck control assessment undertaken. Neck conditioning exercises should be generally promoted amongst the DS population. Awareness of potential signs and symptoms of symptomatic AAI need to be raised amongst DS patients, family members and professionals caring for this group of patients as well as the need to provide appropriate supervision when DS patients are undertaking

2017 British Journal of Sports Medicine Blog

149. Markus G. Seidel: Baby genome screening—paving the way to genetic discrimination?

or index cases are identified in the patient’s family. [3,4] However, some experts predict that it will become feasible and affordable to perform population-wide newborn whole genome sequencing in the near future. [5,6] There are at least three issues related to baby genome screening that directly conflict with our Hippocratic duty to protect patients: 1) Overdiagnosis, data quality, and interpretation. The ethical guidelines and counseling capacities that we currently use for newborn screening (...) sequencing, at what depth, at which time point, and whether that should depend on the potential medical and psychosocial consequences. A solution to this could be to consider targeted screening of disease-causing genes of known “actionable” inborn errors. This would require clear protection to ensure that only variants in these genes would be reported. 2) Privacy and protection of health-related electronic data. Although any medical data needs to be safely secured, individual genetic information is among

2017 The BMJ Blog

150. Screening for Perinatal Depression

that the patient suffers from mania or bipolar disorder, she should be referred to a psychiatrist before initiating medical therapy because antidepressant monotherapy may trigger mania or psychosis ( ). Mania symptoms include inflated self-esteem or grandiosity, feeling rested after only 3 hours of sleep, or engaging in risky behaviors that worry her friends and family (5). In 2016, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force changed its recommendation for routine depression screening to a B, endorsing depression (...) into pediatric practice. Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health American Academy of Pediatrics. Pediatrics 2010;126:1032–9. Yonkers KA, Vigod S, Ross LE. Diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of mood disorders in pregnant and postpartum women. Obstet Gynecol 2011;117:961–77. Yonkers KA, Wisner KL, Stewart DE, Oberlander TF, Dell DL, Stotland N, et al. The management of depression during pregnancy: a report from the American Psychiatric Association and the American College

2015 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

151. Effectiveness of Family and Caregiver Interventions on Patient Outcomes among Adults with Cancer or Memory-Related Disorders

Key Question #1. What are the benefits of family and caregiver psychosocial interventions for adult patients with cancer compared to usual care or wait list? a. What are the harms of these interventions? b. Do these benefits/harms vary by type of intervention, health condition, or patient functional status, or across outcomes? 36iii Effectiveness of Family and Caregiver Interventions on Patient Outcomes among Adults with Cancer or Memory-Related Disorders Evidence-based Synthesis Program Key (...) Question #2. What are the benefits of one family or caregiver oriented psychosocial intervention compared to either: 1) a patient-directed intervention or 2) another alternative family-oriented intervention in improving outcomes for adult patients with cancer? a. What are the harms of these interventions? b. Do these benefits/harms vary by type of intervention, health condition, or patient functional status, or across outcomes? 54 Memory-Related Disorders 67 Key Question #1. What are the benefits

2013 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

152. Screening, Assessment, and Care of Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms in Adults With Cancer Guideline Adaptation

) and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (the Partnership) guideline Assessment of Psychosocial Health Care Needs of the Adult Cancer Patient suggests screening at initial diagnosis, start of treatment, regular intervals during treatment, end of treatment, post-treatment or at transition to survivorship, at recurrence or progression, advanced disease, when dying, and during times of personal transition or reappraisal such as family crisis, during post-treatment survivorship and when approaching death (...) , National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. Abstract Section: Purpose A Pan-Canadian Practice Guideline on Screening, Assessment, and Care of Psychosocial Distress (Depression, Anxiety) in Adults With Cancer was identified for adaptation. Methods American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. Results On the basis

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2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

153. Screening, Assessment, and Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer Guideline Adaptation

interventions, psychosocial interventions, and mind-body interventions may reduce cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment patients. There is limited evidence for use of psychostimulants in the management of fatigue in patients who are disease free after active treatment. Conclusion Fatigue is prevalent in cancer survivors and often causes significant disruption in functioning and quality of life. Regular screening, assessment, and education and appropriate treatment of fatigue are important in managing (...) free and have transitioned to maintenance or adjuvant therapy (eg, patients with breast cancer receiving hormonal therapy, patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors). Target Audience This guidance is intended to inform health care professionals (eg, medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists, psychosocial and rehabilitation professionals, primary care providers, nurses, and others involved in the delivery of care for survivors) as well as patients, family

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2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

154. The Role of Worksite Health Screening

higher risk individuals. Health screenings serve as a catalyst to further clinical health assessments for those who were not aware of their risk factors as well as a first step in a workplace health and wellness promotion process where awareness of personal health risks can lead to participation in lifestyle change or tailoring of disease management programs (eg, structured exercise, dietary, or psychosocial interventions). Increasingly, based on provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable (...) The Role of Worksite Health Screening The Role of Worksite Health Screening | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access

2014 American Heart Association

155. Guidelines for the screening, care and treatment of persons with hepatitis C infection

Guidelines for the screening, care and treatment of persons with hepatitis C infection C GUIDELINES FOR THE SCREENING, CARE AND TREATMENT OF PERSONS WITH HEPATITIS C INFECTION APRIL 2014 GUIDELINES Global Hepatitis Programme Department of HIV/AIDS 20, avenue Appia 1211 Geneva 27 Switzerland E-mail: hepatitis@who.int http://www.who.int/hiv/topics/hepatitis/en/ 978 92 4 154875 5 GUIDELINES FOR THE SCREENING, CARE AND TREATMENT OF PERSONS WITH HEPATITIS C INFECTIONGUIDELINES GUIDELINES (...) FOR THE SCREENING, CARE AND TREATMENT OF PERSONS WITH HEPATITIS C INFECTION APRIL 2014WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Guidelines for the screening, care and treatment of persons with hepatitis C infection. 1.Hepatitis C – prevention and control. 2.Hepatitis C – diagnosis. 3.Hepatitis C – drug therapy. 4.Guideline. I.World Health Organization. ISBN 978 92 4 154875 5 (NLM classification: WC 536) © World Health Organization 2014 All rights reserved. Publications of the World Health Organization

2014 World Health Organisation Guidelines

156. Assessment of the 12-Lead ECG as a Screening Test for Detection of Cardiovascular Disease in Healthy General Populations of Young People (12?25 Years of Age)

abnormal. , , , , Both AHA and ESC consensus panels have agreed previously that screening to detect cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic young competitive athletes is justifiable in principle on ethical, legal, and medical grounds. Reliable exclusion of cardiovascular disease by such screening may provide a large measure of reassurance to this specific population of young people and their families. However, the US and AHA position against national mandatory screening ECGs of athletes (...) can promote ischemic rhabdomyolysis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. , In 2010, the NCAA mandated sickle cell trait screening (with solubility testing) for all student-athletes in Division I sports. This program was created as part of a legal settlement with Rice University and the NCAA filed by the family of a college football player who died of exertional sickling with rhabdomyolysis at age 19 years. Also, all blacks and others are tested routinely for sickle cell trait at birth since

2014 American Heart Association

157. Recommendations on screening for type 2 diabetes in adults

area in which other health professionals, such as registered nurses, pharmacists and dietitians, play an important role. The initial stage of screening — risk calculation using FINDRISC or CAN-RISK — does not result in a diagnosis of diabetes; rather, it identifies people at elevated risk in whom more intensive testing is appropriate. Risk calculation may be performed by other health professionals, in a range of settings. A summary of the guidelines has been prepared for use by family physicians (...) Screening may lead to overdiagnosis, inappropriate investigation and treatment, avoidable adverse effects, and unnecessary psychosocial and economic costs. However, no studies were found that specifically examined these issues in diabetes. Physical harm associated with diabetes screening may be considered negligible, but psychological and social harm could be more substantial. Despite the absence of evidence, clinicians should remain aware of the potential harm resulting from a positive diagnosis

2012 CPG Infobase

158. A randomized controlled trial of a supportive expressive group intervention for women with a family history of breast cancer. (PubMed)

, this study compared two interventions: a standard risk-counseling arm (RC) compared with that plus SE group intervention. The primary study outcome was BC anxiety. Secondary outcomes included psychosocial functioning, risk comprehension, BC knowledge, and screening behaviors.A total of 161 women with a family history of BC were randomized into SE (N = 108) or RC (N = 53). Participants in both study arms significantly improved on measures of BC anxiety, psychosocial functioning, risk comprehension, and BC (...) A randomized controlled trial of a supportive expressive group intervention for women with a family history of breast cancer. Women with a family history of breast cancer (BC) often overestimate their BC risk. Heightened psychological distress may interfere with risk comprehension and screening adherence. The primary purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a 12-week manual-based supportive-expressive (SE) group intervention for this population.Using a randomized control trial design

2018 Psycho-oncology

159. Resilience and social support as protective factors against abuse of patients with dementia: A study on family caregivers. (PubMed)

Resilience and social support as protective factors against abuse of patients with dementia: A study on family caregivers. Scientific literature has identified different vulnerability factors associated to abuse in people with dementia (PWD), but little is known about the psychosocial protective variables against abuse. The main objective of this study is to investigate a set of caregiver and patient factors linked to abuse-related behavior of PWD.A total of 326 primary and family caregivers (...) with the caregiver, and perceived burden are positively related with abuse. However, resilience and social support showed a negative relationship with Caregiver Abuse Screen scores, suggesting a protective effect on abuse, even after controlling the effect of a number of covariates. Indeed, resilience was the only variable that remained significant after including the effect of burden.This paper states the role of burden in abuse of PWD, while resilience and social support are abuse protective factors

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2018 International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

160. Family Partner Navigation for Children

will be followed through the EHR for 12 months, for outcomes in services access and symptom tracking. The main effects will be estimated of the three experimental factors and their interactions on the study's primary outcome - family engagement in child mental health services. This information then guides assembly of an optimized FN model that achieves the primary outcomes with least resource consumption and participant burden. Children will be enrolled if they have a positive behavioral health screen (...) FN & Enhanced Monitoring Participants randomized into this arm will receive the usual Standard Family Navigation (FN) and Enhanced Monitoring Behavioral: Standard FN (Family Navigation) In standard FN (i.e. Usual care), Family Partners keep records and communicate with families using standard information technology, including telephones, electronic medical records, and standard desktop software. Behavioral: Enhanced Monitoring In Massachusetts, behavioral screening is mandated at every pediatric

2018 Clinical Trials

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