How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

3,605 results for

Family Psychosocial Screening

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

61. Screening of fetal aneuploidies whereby non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT)

( 35 years, positive screening test for the first/second quarter, suggestive fetal US findings, contraindication for invasive testing, personal/family history of chromosomal anomalies Single, twin, egg-donor pregnancies and IVF pregnancies Ebios Futura S.r.l. (Cuneo, Italy) Prenataltest ® Illumina NGS (WGS) T21, T18, T13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies 1:1000), though only for T21 in this last case. In Belgium and the Netherlands NIPT is now accessable for all pregnant women, although in the latter (...) pregnant women who have chosen to have prenatal screening for T21, T18 and T13, some highlight the special relevance for high-risk preg- nancies (=35 years old, increased risk based on screening methods, ultrasound anomalies, prior pregnancies with aneuploidy, family risk, other medical reasons) (Table 3). Several assays, among these IONA ® and Verifi™, specify that these tests are not intended as the sole basis for diagnosis [78, 79]. The PrenaTest ® indicates that it should be used in combination

2018 EUnetHTA

62. Family Psychosocial Screening

Family Psychosocial Screening Family Psychosocial Screening Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Family Psychosocial (...) Screening Family Psychosocial Screening Aka: Family Psychosocial Screening From Related Chapters II. Description Assess parent risk factors for child behavior problems Parent physically abused as a child Parental Maternal depression Requires 10 minutes for parent to complete Score suggests referral or no referral III. Efficacy : >90% : >90% IV. Resources and References Kemper (1996) Ambulatory Child Health 4:325-39 Developmental and Behavioral Screening Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing

2015 FP Notebook

63. Effects of group interventions for children who experience family disruption

introduced for those who wish to participate. Our purpose in this systematic review was to summarise the effects of group interventions for children and youth who are experiencing or have experienced family break up. We examined effects on psychosocial outcomes, including behavioural outcomes, and physiological outcomes. Method We searched for primary studies in relevant databases. We completed the search in October 2015. Two people independently screened the literature search set and selected (...) you found an error? Order Download: Key message Children and youth who experience divorce or family break up will generally have an increased risk of emotional and behavioural adjustment problems. Consequently, prevention programs in the form of group intervention have been developed to prevent negative psychosocial consequences in both the short and long term. In this systematic review, we have summarised the results of studies that compared group interventions for children in divorce

2016 Norwegian Institute of Public Health

64. The epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of psychosocial problems in patients and families affected by non-intellectually impairing craniofacial malformation conditions

The epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of psychosocial problems in patients and families affected by non-intellectually impairing craniofacial malformation conditions Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external (...) websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect measures Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening

2018 PROSPERO

65. Psychosocial development of full term singletons, born after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) at preschool age and family functioning: a prospective case-controlled study and multi-informant approach. (PubMed)

Psychosocial development of full term singletons, born after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) at preschool age and family functioning: a prospective case-controlled study and multi-informant approach. Do full term singletons born after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) differ in their psychosocial functioning from children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and spontaneous conceived controls (SC)?The psychosocial maturation process of 5-6-year-old PGD children (...) a normal maturation process. However, the complex reality of PGD families (e.g. safety of the technique and psychological burden of genetic histories) asks for an exclusive PGD sample with matched control groups and a multi-informant approach.Between April 2011 and May 2013, the psychosocial wellbeing of preschoolers and their families born after PGD was assessed in a prospective case-controlled, matched follow-up study, with a multi-informant approach.A group of 47 PGD, 50 ICSI and 55 SC 5-6-year-old

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Human Reproduction

66. The impact or effect of 'wish- granting' interventions on the psychosocial and physical wellbeing of children with life threatening conditions, and their families

The impact or effect of 'wish- granting' interventions on the psychosocial and physical wellbeing of children with life threatening conditions, and their families Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr (...) Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect measures Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening will be performed in two phases, namely initial

2018 PROSPERO

67. Psychosocial intervention on uncertainty in illness in adult patients and their family members: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Psychosocial intervention on uncertainty in illness in adult patients and their family members: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne (...) ") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect measures Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening will be performed in two phases, namely initial screening based on title

2018 PROSPERO

68. An exploration of workplace interventions intended to improve the psychosocial, job-related, eudaimonic, and/or work-family well-being of workers 18 and over: protocol for a systematic review

An exploration of workplace interventions intended to improve the psychosocial, job-related, eudaimonic, and/or work-family well-being of workers 18 and over: protocol for a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external (...) websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect measures Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening

2018 PROSPERO

69. Outcomes following family-based psychosocial interventions for patients with dementia: protocol for a systematic review

Outcomes following family-based psychosocial interventions for patients with dementia: protocol for a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) : Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect measures Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening will be performed in two phases, namely initial screening based on title and abstract, followed

2018 PROSPERO

70. Screening for Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review

Screening for Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review Screening for Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review | CADTH.ca CADTH Document Viewer Screening for Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review Table of Contents Search this document Screening for Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review March 2017 Executive Summary The Issue The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) requested a systematic review on screening for hepatitis C to help inform their recommendations. This systematic (...) review will be used along with other resources to develop the CTFPHC recommendations on screening for hepatitis C. 1 The scope of this review was developed with the CTFPHC. This report should not be interpreted as a stand-alone document, and readers are encouraged to consult the CTFPHC’s full guideline document. 2 Objectives The objectives are: (1) to assess the published research evidence on the clinical effectiveness, harms, cost-effectiveness, and associated patients’ preferences and values

2017 CADTH - Health Technology Assessment

71. HPV Testing for Primary Cervical Cancer Screening — Project Protocol

screening of asymptomatic women in Canada? What are the perspectives of women, their family members, and their caregivers regarding the value and impact of HPV testing for cervical cancer screening on their health, health care, and lives? What ethical issues are raised by HPV testing for cervical cancer screening and how might they be addressed? What are the main challenges, considerations, and enablers to implementing HPV testing for primary cervical cancer screening in Canada? What (...) HPV Testing for Primary Cervical Cancer Screening — Project Protocol HPV Testing for Primary Cervical Cancer Screening — Project Protocol | CADTH.ca CADTH Document Viewer HPV Testing for Primary Cervical Cancer Screening — Project Protocol Table of Contents Search this document HPV Testing for Primary Cervical Cancer Screening — Project Protocol May 2017 Rationale and Policy Issues It is estimated that more than 80% of sexually active women will acquire a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection

2017 CADTH - Optimal Use

72. Screening and Management of Late and Long-term Consequences of Myeloma and its Treatment

of morbidity and mortality. This leads to a complex burden for the patient and their family, and a high impact on psychosocial wellbeing and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Given the extended duration of life and cumulative effects, the burden is often greatest in those with advancing age and multiply-relapsed disease. The case for screening and management of late effects in myeloma A key principle of the National Health Service (NHS)-based National Cancer Survivorship Initiative (NCSI; England (...) summarise here the evidence for the key late effects in long-term survivors of myeloma, including physical and psychosocial consequences (in Parts 1 and 2 respectively), and recommend the use of late-effects screening protocols in detection and intervention. The early recognition of late effects and effective management strategies should lead to an improvement in the management of myeloma patients, although evidence in this area is currently limited and fur- ther research is warranted. Keywords: myeloma

2017 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

73. Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

clinicians to anticipate problems patients may have in understanding and adhering to recommended therapy, notes the USPSTF. This information may also be useful to patients and their caregivers and family members in anticipating and planning for future problems that may develop as a result of progression of cognitive impairment. On the basis of low-quality evidence, CTFPHC strongly recommends against screening asymptomatic adults 65 years of age or older for cognitive impairment. Given the lack (...) of nonpharmacologic treatment. A relatively lower value is placed on limited evidence about patient preferences and limited evidence showing that treatment of MCI is not associated with an increase of serious adverse events or psychosocial harms. Although CTFPHC recommends against screening for cognitive impairment, it also provides considerations for implementation of this recommendation. Similar to USPSTF, CTFPHC encourages practitioners to examine and assess cognitive functions and functional autonomy whenever

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

74. Final recommendation statement: vision in children ages 6 months to 5 years: screening.

for amblyopia include strabismus; high, uncorrected refractive errors (e.g., myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism); anisometropia; and media opacity. Additional risk factors associated with amblyopia, strabismus, or refractive errors include family history in a first-degree relative, prematurity, low birth weight, maternal substance abuse, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and low levels of parental education. Screening Tests A variety of screening tests are used to identify vision abnormalities in children (...) Vision abnormalities: Refractive errors Media opacity (e.g., cataracts) Strabismus Amblyopia Prevention Screening Family Practice Ophthalmology Optometry Pediatrics Preventive Medicine Advanced Practice Nurses Allied Health Personnel Nurses Optometrists Physician Assistants Physicians To update the 2011 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for amblyopia and its risk factors in children Children aged 6 months to 5 years Vision screening in children to detect

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

75. Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing MTCT of HIV, HBV, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations

Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing MTCT of HIV, HBV, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations TECHNICAL REPORT Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing mother- child-transmission of HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations Literature review www.ecdc.europa.euECDC TECHNICAL REPORT Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations (...) Leino, Markku Kuusi, and Mika Salminen Helena de Carvalho Gomes and Ana-Belen Escriva are acknowledged for internal ECDC support. Suggested citation: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing mother-child-transmission of HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations. Stockholm: ECDC; 2017. Stockholm, March 2017 ISBN 978-92-9498-032-8 doi: 10.2900/580446 Catalogue number TQ-02-17-142-EN-N © European Centre for Disease

2017 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Literature Reviews

76. Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents

Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents | From the American Academy of Pediatrics | Pediatrics '); document.write(''); } function OAS_AD(pos) { if (OAS_version >= 11 && typeof(OAS_RICH)!='undefined') { OAS_RICH(pos); } else { OAS_NORMAL(pos); } } //--> Search for this keyword Source User menu Sections Sign up (...) for highlighting editor-chosen studies with the greatest impact on clinical care. Clinical Practice Guideline for Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents Joseph T. Flynn , David C. Kaelber , Carissa M. Baker-Smith , Douglas Blowey , Aaron E. Carroll , Stephen R. Daniels , Sarah D. de Ferranti , Janis M. Dionne , Bonita Falkner , Susan K. Flinn , Samuel S. Gidding , Celeste Goodwin , Michael G. Leu , Makia E. Powers , Corinna Rea , Joshua Samuels , Madeline Simasek , Vidhu V

2017 American Academy of Pediatrics

77. Vision in Children Ages 6 Months to 5 Years: Screening

is of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence that treatment reduced the incidence of long-term amblyopia or improved school performance, functioning, or quality of life. Limited evidence suggests that screening can potentially reduce psychosocial harms. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence that treatment of amblyopia or its risk factors in children younger than 3 years leads to improved vision outcomes (ie, visual acuity) or other benefits. Harms of Early Detection and Treatment The USPSTF (...) include strabismus; high, uncorrected refractive errors (eg, myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism); anisometropia; and media opacity. Additional risk factors associated with amblyopia, strabismus, or refractive errors include family history in a first-degree relative, prematurity, low birth weight, maternal substance abuse, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and low levels of parental education. , Screening Tests A variety of screening tests are used to identify vision abnormalities in children

2017 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

78. Checking Out Checking In: The Development and Validation of an Electronic Screening Tool for Pediatric Psychosocial Distress

Checking Out Checking In: The Development and Validation of an Electronic Screening Tool for Pediatric Psychosocial Distress Checking Out Checking In: The Development and Validation of an Electronic Screening Tool for Pediatric Psychosocial Distress - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached (...) the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Checking Out Checking In: The Development and Validation of an Electronic Screening Tool for Pediatric Psychosocial Distress The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our

2015 Clinical Trials

79. Psychosocial and Sociocultural Factors Influencing Antenatal Anxiety and Depression in Non-precarious Migrant Women (PubMed)

socioeconomic status, marital support, family presence in Geneva and parity, while AD was predicted by one dimension of acculturation, i.e., attachment to the heritage culture. Our study can inform perinatal health care professionals about some specific risk factors for antenatal distress in migrant women in order to increase systematic screening procedures. (...) Psychosocial and Sociocultural Factors Influencing Antenatal Anxiety and Depression in Non-precarious Migrant Women The aims of this paper are (1) to assess the role of sociodemographic and psychosocial risk factors on antenatal anxiety (AA) and antenatal depression (AD) in first-generation migrant women in Geneva, as compared to a control group of native Swiss women, and (2) to examine the role of acculturation and other sociocultural factors in the development of antenatal distress in migrant

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Frontiers in psychology

80. Easing Psychosocial Burden for Informal Caregivers

Easing Psychosocial Burden for Informal Caregivers Easing Psychosocial Burden for Informal Caregivers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Easing Psychosocial Burden for Informal Caregivers (...) in this study involves the inclusion of screening and targeted referral components as suggested by Reynolds et al. [79]. Research study assistants conducting the screening and providing feedback and referrals will be trained in the NCCN guidelines for distress management and will discuss the screening results and associated recommendations with the study PI (NCCN) [63]. As of November, 2017, ICs of patients seen in the Neurology Service at MSKCC are not consistently screened for distress and offered

2018 Clinical Trials

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>