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Family Psychosocial Screening

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41. Familial breast cancer: classification, care and managing breast cancer and related risks in people with a family history of breast cancer

finding should first be carried out on an affected family member where possible. [2004] [2004] 1.5.6 If possible, the development of a genetic test for a family should usually start with the testing of an affected individual (mutation searching/screening) to try to identify a mutation in the appropriate gene (such as BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53) (see recommendations 1.5.8–1.5.13). [2004] [2004] 1.5.7 A search/screen for a mutation in a gene (such as BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53) should aim for as close to 100 (...) Familial breast cancer: classification, care and managing breast cancer and related risks in people with a family history of breast cancer Familial breast cancer: classification, care Familial breast cancer: classification, care and managing breast cancer and related and managing breast cancer and related risks in people with a family history of risks in people with a family history of breast cancer breast cancer Clinical guideline Published: 25 June 2013 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg164 © NICE 2018

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

42. Does the use of the revised Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PATrev) result in improved quality of life and reduced psychosocial risk in Canadian families with a child newly diagnosed with cancer?

Does the use of the revised Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PATrev) result in improved quality of life and reduced psychosocial risk in Canadian families with a child newly diagnosed with cancer? Early psychosocial screening may guide interventions and ameliorate the adverse psychosocial effects of childhood cancer. The revised psychosocial assessment tool provides risk information - Universal (typical distress), Targeted (additional specific distress), and Clinical (severe distress) - about (...) the child with cancer and his or her family. This pilot study investigated the benefits of providing a summary of family psychosocial risk information to the medical team treating the newly diagnosed child (Experimental Group, EG).We conducted a pilot randomized control trial with a sample of 67 parents, comparing the EG to the control group (CG) on parental perception of family psychosocial difficulties (revised psychosocial assessment tool risk levels), child behavior (behavior assessment scale

2014 Psycho-oncology

43. Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff

advice to all fertility clinic staff (doctors, nurses, midwives, counsellors, social workers, psychologists, embryologists, and administrative personnel) on how to incorporate psychosocial care in routine infertility care. Psychosocial care is defined as care that enables couples, their families, and their healthcare providers to optimize fertility care and manage the psychological and social implications of infertility and its treatment (Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health (...) of psychosocial care for patients. However, the guideline also considers that patients may vary greatly in the types and level of needs they have. To capture this individual variability regarding needs, the guideline informs about risk factors (correlates and predictors) for specific psychosocial needs and about existing infertility-specific and valid tools to detect them. Risk factors point to a patient risk profile and tools are useful for clinical assessment and screening. Fertility staff also have

2015 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

44. Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis

Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis - National Elf Service Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis May 2 2017 Posted by This is the third in a series of Mental Elf blogs produced in partnership with the British Journal of Psychiatry. Lutgens, Gariepy and Malla (2017) take on a large piece of work with this systematic review (...) contribute to poor quality of life, poor physical health and significant carer burden. Methods Using a pre-registered protocol and following PRISMA guidelines, authors systematically searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Psych Info and the Cochrane Library databases for papers that investigated psychological or social interventions and reported negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Inclusion criteria for studies included: RCT design Investigating psychological or psychosocial treatment Report

2017 The Mental Elf

45. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease - Psychosocial Care

(eg, printed lea?et) about ADPKD that is endorsed by experts and suitableformembersofthepublic(eg,employers, insurers, educational institutions). Genetic Screening and Testing Refer to the article on Genetics and Genetic Counsel- ing and Screening for Polycystic Kidney Disease for more detail. ! Provide counseling to address self-blame and guilt because of genetic transmission. ! Address family planning. ! Discuss issues around genetic testing and disclosure. IMPLEMENTATION AND AUDIT Patients (...) a detrimental impact on the quality of life and psychosocial and social outcomes in patients with ADPKD. 11–15 A systematic review on patient perspectives of living with ADPKD found that the erratic onset and intensity of pain disrupted daily living and prevented patients from developing long-term career and family goals. They experienced persisting uncertainties including perceived ambiguities surrounding the mean- ing and implications of their diagnosis, disempower- ment in self-management, inability

2015 KHA-CARI Guidelines

46. Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians (PubMed)

and a variety of child and adult health problems, including developmental delay, asthma and heart disease. Despite the detrimental effects of social determinants on health, few child health clinicians routinely address the unmet social and psychosocial factors impacting children and their families during routine primary care visits. Clinicians need tools to screen for social determinants of health and to be familiar with available local and national resources to address these issues. These guidelines (...) Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians Approximately 20% of all children in the United States live in poverty, which exists in rural, urban, and suburban areas. Thus, all child health clinicians need to be familiar with the effects of poverty on health and to understand associated, preventable, and modifiable social factors that impact health. Social determinants of health are identifiable root causes of medical problems

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2016 Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care

47. Pancreatic Cancer: Screening

of familial pancreatic cancer and inherited genetic syndromes are an active area of research. Continued research in this area is needed to identify effective screening strategies and to determine the benefits (ie, improved clinical outcomes) and harms of screening for pancreatic cancer in this population. If a net benefit of screening is found in high-risk persons, studies of screening in persons who may be at increased risk (eg, adults with new-onset diabetes) may be warranted. Research on improved risk (...) in the United States. Scope of Review To update its 2004 recommendation on screening for pancreatic cancer, the USPSTF commissioned a systematic review on the benefits and harms of screening for pancreatic cancer, the diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for pancreatic cancer, and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected or asymptomatic pancreatic cancer. , The USPSTF considered studies of screening in persons at high risk of pancreatic cancer due to familial history to determine whether

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

48. Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding - ACOG Menu ▼ Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Page Navigation ▼ Number 785 Committee on Adolescent Health Care This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Adolescent Health Care (...) in collaboration with committee members Oluyemisi Adeyemi-Fowode, MD and Judith Simms-Cendan, MD. Screening and Management of Bleeding Disorders in Adolescents With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding ABSTRACT : Heavy menstrual bleeding is defined as excessive menstrual blood loss that interferes with a woman's physical, social, emotional, or material quality of life. If obstetrician–gynecologists suspect that a patient has a bleeding disorder, they should work in coordination with a hematologist for laboratory

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

49. Screening and Management of the Hyperandrogenic Adolescent

Screening and Management of the Hyperandrogenic Adolescent ACOGCOMMITTEEOPINION Number 789 Committee on Adolescent Health Care This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Adolescent Health Care in collaboration with committee members Jennie Yoost, MD and Ashlyn Savage, MD. Screening and Management of the Hyperandrogenic Adolescent ABSTRACT: Although androgen excess can manifest in many ways, the most common and recognizable (...) symptoms are hirsutism and acne. Reports of hirsutism and acne should be taken seriously because of their possible association with medical disorders, their substantial effect on self-esteem and quality of life, and the potential for psychosocial morbidity. In patients with symptoms of androgen excess, the differential diagnosis should include physiologic hyperandrogenism of puberty, idiopathic hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is a great deal of overlap between the symptoms

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

50. Acceptability of psychosocial interventions for dementia caregivers: a systematic review. (PubMed)

Acceptability of psychosocial interventions for dementia caregivers: a systematic review. Most of patients with dementia are cared for by family members. Caring for people with dementia is challenging; approximately 30-55% of caregivers suffered from anxiety or depressive symptoms. A range of studies have shown that psychosocial interventions are effective and can improve caregivers' quality of life, reduce their care burden, and ease their anxiety or depressive symptoms. However, information (...) on the acceptability of these interventions, despite being crucial, is under-reported.Systematic searches of databases were conducted for literature published on EMBASE, PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and PsycARTICLES until August 2017 and the searches were updated on June 2018. The selection criteria included primary studies with data about the acceptability of psychosocial interventions for informal caregivers and publications written in English. Two authors independently selected studies

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2019 BMC Psychiatry

51. Assessment of pre-operative psychosocial function among people receiving left ventricular assist devices: A national survey of US LVAD programs. (PubMed)

programs from throughout the U.S. that implanted 64.8% of all U.S LVADs in 2016. More than 39 psychosocial screening instruments were used. Assessment of family, social and emotional support occurred most frequently (84.1% (n = 58) of programs assessed 100% of patients), but assessment was least likely to be conducted with standardized instruments (36.2%). Cognitive dysfunction was the least likely characteristic to be assessed (26.1% (n = 18) of programs assessed 100% of patients), but was most often (...) Assessment of pre-operative psychosocial function among people receiving left ventricular assist devices: A national survey of US LVAD programs. The International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) includes assessment of four elements of psychosocial functioning prior to Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) implantation. Information about the practices and impact of assessments of psychosocial functioning are limited.To describe

2019 Heart & Lung

52. Resilient, recovering, distressed: A longitudinal qualitative study of parent psychosocial trajectories following child critical injury. (PubMed)

parental adaptation and prevent adverse mental health outcomes, and address families' psychosocial support needs following child injury. Screening for parent psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder is needed from the time of the child's admission, and a dedicated trauma support role can facilitate an integrated care approach for children and families with complex needs across the care continuum.Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved. (...) to their child's injury and struggled to adapt and regain their wellbeing over time, remaining emotionally distressed about the circumstances and impacts of the injury on their child and family. Illustrative narratives that represent each trajectory are presented.This is the first qualitative study to report the psychosocial trajectories of parents of critically injured children. Clinical application of insights provided by these trajectories can assist clinicians to use targeted strategies to help strengthen

2019 Injury

53. Family-focused prevention to improve cognitive, educational, and social-emotional development of immigrant children and adolescents

Family-focused prevention to improve cognitive, educational, and social-emotional development of immigrant children and adolescents The Campbell Collaboration | www.campbellcollaboration.org Family-focused prevention to improve cognitive, educational, and social-emotional development of immigrant children and adolescents: a systematic review Louisa S. Arnold, Andreas Beelmann, and Douglas Coatsworth Submitted to the Coordinating Group of: Crime and Justice Education Disability International (...) Development Nutrition Social Welfare Other: Plans to co-register: No Yes Cochrane Other Maybe Date Submitted: 16 June 2016 Date Revision Submitted: 1 December 2016 Approval Date: 29 January 2017 Publication Date: 6 February 2017 1 The Campbell Collaboration | www.campbellcollaboration.org TITLE OF THE REVIEW Family-focused prevention to improve cognitive, educational, and social-emotional development of immigrant children and adolescents: a systematic review BACKGROUND In most Western-industrialized

2017 Campbell Collaboration

54. Screening for disruptive behaviour problems in preschool children in primary health care settings

improve outcome trajectories. This position statement provides an approach to early identification using clinical screening at periodic health examinations, followed by a systematic mental health examination that includes standardized measures. The practitioner should consider a range of environmental, developmental, family and parent–child relationship factors to evaluate the clinical significance of disruptive behaviours. Options within a management plan include regular monitoring, accompanied (...) maintenance guides or as parent-reported screening measures. Such approaches are detailed in the following sections. THE ROURKE BABY RECORD AND ABCdaire Current recommended practices in Canada for monitoring health and development in children ≤5 years of age are covered by the Rourke Baby Record (RBR) and ABCdaire (Université de Montréal, ). Using the RBR is recommended at well-child visits and is endorsed by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Canadian Paediatric Society. It was updated

2017 Canadian Paediatric Society

55. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children’s early media experiences involves (...) four principles: minimizing, mitigating, mindfully using and modelling healthy use of screens. Knowing how young children learn and develop informs best practice strategies for health care providers. Keywords: Development; Digital media; Health; Infant; Preschool child; Screen time    

2017 Canadian Paediatric Society

56. Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world

Screen time and young children: Promoting health and development in a digital world The digital landscape is evolving more quickly than research on the effects of screen media on the development, learning and family life of young children. This statement examines the potential benefits and risks of screen media in children younger than 5 years, focusing on developmental, psychosocial and physical health. Evidence-based guidance to optimize and support children’s early media experiences involves (...) four principles: minimizing, mitigating, mindfully using and modelling healthy use of screens. Knowing how young children learn and develop informs best practice strategies for health care providers. Keywords: Development; Digital media; Health; Infant; Preschool child; Screen time    

2017 Canadian Paediatric Society

57. Protocol for a feasibility study of group-based focused psychosocial support to improve the psychosocial well-being and functioning of adults affected by humanitarian crises in Nepal: Group Problem Management Plus (PM+) (PubMed)

care (EUC; n = 60). Psychological distress, functional impairment, depression symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and perceived problems will be measured during screening, pre-treatment baseline, and 7-10 days after the intervention. Qualitative data will be collected from beneficiaries, their families, local stakeholders, and staff to support quantitative data and to identify themes reporting that those involved and/or effected by Group PM+ perceived it as being acceptable (...) Protocol for a feasibility study of group-based focused psychosocial support to improve the psychosocial well-being and functioning of adults affected by humanitarian crises in Nepal: Group Problem Management Plus (PM+) The prevalence of common mental disorders increases in humanitarian emergencies while access to services to address them decreases. Problem Management Plus (PM+) is a brief five-session trans-diagnostic psychological WHO intervention employing empirically supported strategies

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2018 Pilot and feasibility studies

58. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening

. False-positive results are an important potential harm, with rates ranging from 0.8% to 21.5%. , , However, the direct harms of screening are unclear. Potential harms of false-positive results include unnecessary follow-up visits, increased cancer risk attributable to radiation exposure, overtreatment, or psychosocial effects associated with the diagnosis of clinically nonsignificant scoliosis. Current Practice Various organizations have recommended routine screening for scoliosis in children (...) Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening Final Recommendation Statement: Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening - US Preventive Services Task Force Search USPSTF Website Text size: Assembly version: 1.0.0.308 Last Build: 11/16/2018 6:27:19 PM You are here: Final Recommendation Statement : Final Recommendation Statement Final Recommendation Statement Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Screening Recommendations made by the USPSTF are independent of the U.S. government. They should

2018 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

59. Final recommendation statement: adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: screening.

unnecessary follow-up visits, increased cancer risk attributable to radiation exposure, overtreatment, or psychosocial effects associated with the diagnosis of clinically nonsignificant scoliosis. Current Practice Various organizations have recommended routine screening for scoliosis in children and adolescents since the 1980s. More than half of U.S. states either mandate or recommend school-based screening for scoliosis. Children and adolescents are usually screened with the forward bend test (...) design or methods Inconsistency of findings across individual studies Gaps in the chain of evidence Findings not generalizable to routine primary care practice A lack of information on important health outcomes More information may allow an estimation of effects on health outcomes. None provided Idiopathic scoliosis Prevention Screening Family Practice Internal Medicine Pediatrics Preventive Medicine Advanced Practice Nurses Allied Health Personnel Nurses Physician Assistants Physicians To update

2018 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

60. Screening for Perinatal Depression

to care in post-natal depression: women’s attitudes to post-natal depression and its treatment. Br J Gen Pract 1996;46: 427–8. 8. Earls MF. Incorporating recognition and management of perinatal and postpartum depression into pediatric prac- tice. Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family HealthAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. Pediatrics 2010;126:1032–9. 9. Yonkers KA, Vigod S, Ross LE. Diagnosis, pathophysiol- ogy, and management of mood disorders in pregnant and postpartum women. Obstet (...) Screening for Perinatal Depression INTERIM UPDATE ACOGCOMMITTEEOPINION Number 757 (Replaces Committee Opinion No. 630, May 2015) Committee on Obstetric Practice This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Obstetric Practice. INTERIM UPDATE: This Committee Opinion is updated as highlighted to reflect a limited, focused change in the language and supporting evidence regarding prevalence, benefits of screening, and screening tools

2018 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

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