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Family Psychosocial Screening

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21. Psychosocial needs and interventions for heart failure patients and families receiving palliative care support: a systematic review. (PubMed)

resulting in 962 identified abstracts. After removal of 388 duplicates, 574 abstracts were screened based on the following criteria: (1) available in English, (2) peer-reviewed, (3) empirical data reported, (4) patient receiving palliative or hospice care, and (5) measured psychosocial needs of heart failure patients and/or their family caregivers. After screening 574 abstracts and conducting a full-text review of 150 articles, a total of 17 studies were identified in our review. Only three intervention (...) Psychosocial needs and interventions for heart failure patients and families receiving palliative care support: a systematic review. Although diseases of the heart are the leading cause of death in the USA, palliative care research has largely focused on populations of cancer patients. However, a diagnosis of heart failure differs substantially than that of cancer. They differ in terms of signs and symptoms, disease trajectories, treatment options, stigma, and prognosis. Additionally

2017 Heart Failure Reviews

22. The Psychosocial Effects of Systemic / Family Constellation

The Psychosocial Effects of Systemic / Family Constellation The Psychosocial Effects of Systemic / Family Constellation - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The Psychosocial Effects of Systemic (...) of the Reformed Church in Hungary Collaborator: University of Toronto Information provided by (Responsible Party): Gergely Sándor Szabó, PhD, Károli Gáspár University of the Reformed Church in Hungary Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychosocial effects of systemic / family constellation. The method of systemic / family constellation refers to an approach which integrates ideas from family systems therapy with elements from psychodrama

2017 Clinical Trials

23. Psychosocial Screening for Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients

Psychosocial Screening for Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients Psychosocial Screening for Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Psychosocial Screening for Neuroendocrine (...) provided by (Responsible Party): Shen Lin, Peking University Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a psychosocial screening application to usual care in a cohort of neuroendocrine tumor patients. The application involves monitoring using the NCCN Distress Thermometer(DT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale(HADS), Self-Perceived Burden Scale(SPBS) and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale(CD-RISC). These assessments will be completed at baseline, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24

2017 Clinical Trials

24. Northern Alberta Psychosocial Telecare (NAPT) Screening for HNC Patients

Northern Alberta Psychosocial Telecare (NAPT) Screening for HNC Patients Northern Alberta Psychosocial Telecare (NAPT) Screening for HNC Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Northern (...) Alberta Psychosocial Telecare (NAPT) Screening for HNC Patients (NAPT) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03215199 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting First Posted : July 12, 2017 Last Update Posted : July

2017 Clinical Trials

25. Environmental and Psychosocial Barriers to and Benefits of Cervical Cancer Screening in Kenya (PubMed)

Environmental and Psychosocial Barriers to and Benefits of Cervical Cancer Screening in Kenya Cervical cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in females and is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Kenya; limited cervical cancer screening services may be a factor. Few studies have examined men's and women's perceptions on environmental and psychosocial barriers and benefits related to screening.In 2014, 60 women aged 25-49 years and 40 male partners participated in 10 (...) in low- and middle-income countries is important to successfully implementing emerging screening programs. The novel findings on barriers and benefits from this study can inform the development of targeted community outreach activities, communication strategies, and educational messages for patients, families, and providers. The Oncologist 2017;22: 173-181Implications for Practice: This article provides important information for stakeholders in clinical practice and research when assessing knowledge

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2017 The oncologist

26. Communication Skills Training ? Effect on Nurses? Confidence and Competence in Providing Psychosocial Support to Patients and Families

Communication Skills Training ? Effect on Nurses? Confidence and Competence in Providing Psychosocial Support to Patients and Families Cancer and Blood Disease/Nurses/Communication Skills Training/BESt 165 Best Evidence Statement (BESt) Copyright © 2013 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; all rights reserved Page 1 of 5 Date: April 30, 2013 Title: The Effect of Communication Skills Training on Nurses’ Confidence and Competence in Providing Psychosocial Support to Patients (...) and Families Clinical Question: P (Population/Problem) Among direct care nurses, I (Intervention) does communication skills training C (Comparison) compared to no communication skills training O (Outcome) affect nurses’ confidence and competence in providing psychosocial support to patients and families? Definitions for terms marked with * may be found in the Supporting Information section. Target Population for the Recommendation: Nurses caring for patients and providing psychosocial support in any

2013 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

27. Need for Routine Screening of Health-Related Quality of Life in Families of Young Children with Complex Congenital Heart Disease. (PubMed)

Need for Routine Screening of Health-Related Quality of Life in Families of Young Children with Complex Congenital Heart Disease. To assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in families of young children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD), and identify the demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors that place these children and their mothers at greater risk of vulnerability.This cross-sectional study took place from June 2015 to October 2016 at The Sydney Children's Hospitals (...) the at-risk range. Lower child HRQOL was strongly associated with single ventricle CHD (β = -0.38; P < .001), physical comorbidity (β = -0.32; P = .001), feeding difficulties (β = -0.26; P = .008), and greater maternal psychological stress (β = -0.18; P = .045), accounting for 52% of the variance in child HRQOL. Lower maternal HRQOL was strongly associated with poorer family functioning (β = 0.61; P < .001), greater maternal psychological stress (β = -0.23; P = .004), child physical comorbidity (β = -0.17

2018 Journal of Pediatrics

28. A Program for Improved Family Screening for Colorectal Cancer

A Program for Improved Family Screening for Colorectal Cancer A Program for Improved Family Screening for Colorectal Cancer - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. A Program for Improved Family (...) University Hospital Information provided by (Responsible Party): Poitiers University Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: A first- degree family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) or adenoma before age 65 is associated with a high risk of CRC. For these high-risk subjects, the French 2013 recommendations advise colonoscopy screening, but participation is insufficient (26-54%).The purpose of this project is to propose, through association of multidisciplinary research teams

2018 Clinical Trials

29. Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Wellbeing of Women Who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review

Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Wellbeing of Women Who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Wellbeing of Women Who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse A Campbell Systematic Review 2016:02 Social Welfare Coordinating Group First published: January 2016 Updated: January 2016 Carol Rivas, Jean Ramsay, Laura Sadowski (...) , Leslie Davidson, Danielle Dunne, Sandra Eldridge, Kelsey Hegarty, Angela Taft, Gene FederThe Campbell Library comprises: • Systematic reviews (titles, protocols and reviews) • Policies and Guidelines • Methods Series Go to the library to download these resources, at: www.campbellcollaboration.org/lib/ Better Evidence for a Better World Colophon Title Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Well-Being of Women who Experience Intimate Partner

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2016 Campbell Collaboration

30. Improving Quality of Life of Children With Cancer Through Psychosocial Screening

these children use and value psychosocial tools or how beneficial the use of these tools is for these families. This research team will test the benefits of using psychosocial screening on the quality of life of treated children, parents and siblings. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Cancer Other: Summary of psychosocial risk factors Other: Control Not Applicable Detailed Description: In Canada approximately 1450 children are diagnosed with cancer annually. Childhood cancer diagnosis (...) and treatment can have devastating psychosocial effects on the family. Tools to screen for psychosocial risks (PSR) in pediatric oncology are rare. Our preliminary work adapted the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) for the Canadian population, PATrevised (PATrev), and developed the Psychosocial Care Checklist (PCCL). The PATrev is completed by parents of children with cancer, and yields a summary of the psychosocial needs of the patient, parents, and siblings. The PCCL assesses HCPs knowledge of family's

2016 Clinical Trials

31. Routine primary care screening for intimate partner violence and other adverse psychosocial exposures: what's the evidence? (PubMed)

Routine primary care screening for intimate partner violence and other adverse psychosocial exposures: what's the evidence? Family physicians and other primary care practitioners are encouraged or expected to screen for an expanding array of concerns and problems including intimate partner violence (IPV). While there is no debate about the deleterious impact of violence and other adverse psychosocial exposures on health status, the key question raised here is about the value of routine (...) into the benefits of routine screening for such experiences. To date, there have been no controlled trials examining the impact and outcomes - either beneficial or harmful - of routine ACEs screening. Even so, there is an expansion of calls for routine screening for ACEs. While we must prioritize how best to support and intervene with patients who have experienced IPV and other adverse psychosocial exposures, we should not be lulled into a false sense of security that our routine use of "screeners" results

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2016 BMC Family Practice

32. Guidelines for the management of screen-detected abnormalities, screening in specific populations and investigation of abnormal vaginal bleeding

are transitioning from the old into the new program, psychosocial issues and economic issues. Introduction INTRODUCTION CerviCal SCreeNiNg guideliNeS5 References 1. National health and medical research Council. Screening to prevent cervical cancer: guidelines for the management of asymptomatic women with screen detected abnormalities. Canberra: NhmrC; 2005. for the first time, guidance on the management of symptomatic women has been included, with a particular focus on those with signs or symptoms suggestive (...) in reporting colposcopic findings and treatment. for a detailed overview of the evidence summaries and considerations leading to the recommendations, please access the detailed full text guidelines. in addition, the detailed full text guidelines cover the current epidemiology of cervical cancer in australia, the benefits and harms of cervical screening, the natural history of cervical hPv infection, the terminology for hPv testing, lbC, cervical histopathology and colposcopy, psychosocial issues

2016 Cancer Council Australia

33. Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA

Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA www.ecdc.europa.euECDC SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA ii This report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC (...) Prevention and Control. Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA. Stockholm: ECDC; 2018. Stockholm, November 2018 ISBN 978-92-9498-280-3 doi: 10.2900/154411 Catalogue number TQ-04-18-919-EN-N © European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2018 Reproduction is authorised, provided the source is acknowledged. SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

34. Digital media: Promoting healthy screen use in school-aged children and adolescents

Digital media: Promoting healthy screen use in school-aged children and adolescents Digital media are integrated into the everyday lives of children and adolescents, with potential benefits and risks for learning, mental and physical health, and for social life. This statement examines the cognitive, psychosocial, and physical effects of digital media on school-aged children and adolescents, with a focus on family routines, context, and activities. Evidence-based guidance for clinicians (...) and families involves four principles: healthy management , meaningful screen use, positive modelling , and balanced, informed monitoring of screen time and behaviours.  Keywords: Adolescents; Children; Development; Digital media; Family; Health; Screen use

2019 Canadian Paediatric Society

35. Familial breast cancer: classification, care and managing breast cancer and related risks in people with a family history of breast cancer

finding should first be carried out on an affected family member where possible. [2004] [2004] 1.5.6 If possible, the development of a genetic test for a family should usually start with the testing of an affected individual (mutation searching/screening) to try to identify a mutation in the appropriate gene (such as BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53) (see recommendations 1.5.8–1.5.13). [2004] [2004] 1.5.7 A search/screen for a mutation in a gene (such as BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53) should aim for as close to 100 (...) Familial breast cancer: classification, care and managing breast cancer and related risks in people with a family history of breast cancer Familial breast cancer: classification, care Familial breast cancer: classification, care and managing breast cancer and related and managing breast cancer and related risks in people with a family history of risks in people with a family history of breast cancer breast cancer Clinical guideline Published: 25 June 2013 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg164 © NICE 2018

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

36. Does the use of the revised Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PATrev) result in improved quality of life and reduced psychosocial risk in Canadian families with a child newly diagnosed with cancer?

Does the use of the revised Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PATrev) result in improved quality of life and reduced psychosocial risk in Canadian families with a child newly diagnosed with cancer? Early psychosocial screening may guide interventions and ameliorate the adverse psychosocial effects of childhood cancer. The revised psychosocial assessment tool provides risk information - Universal (typical distress), Targeted (additional specific distress), and Clinical (severe distress) - about (...) the child with cancer and his or her family. This pilot study investigated the benefits of providing a summary of family psychosocial risk information to the medical team treating the newly diagnosed child (Experimental Group, EG).We conducted a pilot randomized control trial with a sample of 67 parents, comparing the EG to the control group (CG) on parental perception of family psychosocial difficulties (revised psychosocial assessment tool risk levels), child behavior (behavior assessment scale

2014 Psycho-oncology

37. Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff

advice to all fertility clinic staff (doctors, nurses, midwives, counsellors, social workers, psychologists, embryologists, and administrative personnel) on how to incorporate psychosocial care in routine infertility care. Psychosocial care is defined as care that enables couples, their families, and their healthcare providers to optimize fertility care and manage the psychological and social implications of infertility and its treatment (Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health (...) of psychosocial care for patients. However, the guideline also considers that patients may vary greatly in the types and level of needs they have. To capture this individual variability regarding needs, the guideline informs about risk factors (correlates and predictors) for specific psychosocial needs and about existing infertility-specific and valid tools to detect them. Risk factors point to a patient risk profile and tools are useful for clinical assessment and screening. Fertility staff also have

2015 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

38. Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis

Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis - National Elf Service Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis May 2 2017 Posted by This is the third in a series of Mental Elf blogs produced in partnership with the British Journal of Psychiatry. Lutgens, Gariepy and Malla (2017) take on a large piece of work with this systematic review (...) contribute to poor quality of life, poor physical health and significant carer burden. Methods Using a pre-registered protocol and following PRISMA guidelines, authors systematically searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Psych Info and the Cochrane Library databases for papers that investigated psychological or social interventions and reported negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Inclusion criteria for studies included: RCT design Investigating psychological or psychosocial treatment Report

2017 The Mental Elf

39. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease - Psychosocial Care

(eg, printed lea?et) about ADPKD that is endorsed by experts and suitableformembersofthepublic(eg,employers, insurers, educational institutions). Genetic Screening and Testing Refer to the article on Genetics and Genetic Counsel- ing and Screening for Polycystic Kidney Disease for more detail. ! Provide counseling to address self-blame and guilt because of genetic transmission. ! Address family planning. ! Discuss issues around genetic testing and disclosure. IMPLEMENTATION AND AUDIT Patients (...) a detrimental impact on the quality of life and psychosocial and social outcomes in patients with ADPKD. 11–15 A systematic review on patient perspectives of living with ADPKD found that the erratic onset and intensity of pain disrupted daily living and prevented patients from developing long-term career and family goals. They experienced persisting uncertainties including perceived ambiguities surrounding the mean- ing and implications of their diagnosis, disempower- ment in self-management, inability

2015 KHA-CARI Guidelines

40. Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians (PubMed)

and a variety of child and adult health problems, including developmental delay, asthma and heart disease. Despite the detrimental effects of social determinants on health, few child health clinicians routinely address the unmet social and psychosocial factors impacting children and their families during routine primary care visits. Clinicians need tools to screen for social determinants of health and to be familiar with available local and national resources to address these issues. These guidelines (...) Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians Approximately 20% of all children in the United States live in poverty, which exists in rural, urban, and suburban areas. Thus, all child health clinicians need to be familiar with the effects of poverty on health and to understand associated, preventable, and modifiable social factors that impact health. Social determinants of health are identifiable root causes of medical problems

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2016 Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care

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