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Family Psychosocial Screening

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1. Screen-based activities and children and young people’s mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: a systematic map of reviews

of included reviews 1 Of the 11 reviews, nine examined associations between screen time and mental health and psychosocial outcomes. Seven reviews also examined the longitudinal consequences of screen time; and one review explored risk factors associated with screen time, also longitudinally. Only one review synthesised qualitative data to explore CYP’s and family members perceptions of barriers to, and facilitators of, reducing screen time. 3.3.4 Review characteristics The scope of reviews was relatively (...) frequently, in one or two reviews only. Psychosocial outcomes were also synthesised, with behavioural issues (often unspecified) and pro-social conduct (e.g. behaviour that benefits other people or society as a whole) and self-esteem reported across five separate reviews. Demographic measures were investigated in four reviews; school measures were assessed in two reviews and parenting/family factors in one review. Longitudinal data examining risk factors (precursors) to screen time (n=1) Only one review

2018 EPPI Centre

2. Screening for Psychosocial Risk in Flemish Families of a Child With Cancer

Screening for Psychosocial Risk in Flemish Families of a Child With Cancer Screening for Psychosocial Risk in Flemish Families of a Child With Cancer - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . Screening for Psychosocial Risk in Flemish Families of a Child With Cancer The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03241251 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : August 7, 2017 Last Update Posted : November

2017 Clinical Trials

3. Screening for Psychosocial and Family Risk in Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disorders. (PubMed)

Screening for Psychosocial and Family Risk in Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disorders. Screening for psychosocial comorbidity is recommended for pediatric patients presenting at an initial gastroenterology (GI) outpatient consultation. We developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of the GI Screener to address the need for a screening tool specific to pediatric GI patients.128 patients (8-18 years old, 63% female) and 126 parents completed age-specific versions of the GI Screener and 3 (...) validated psychosocial comparison instruments (The Behavioral Assessment System for Children, The Functional Disability Inventory, The General Functioning scale of the Family Assessment Device) at their initial GI consultation. (30%) of families repeated the measures 2 weeks later. We identified GI Screener content domains and retained items using exploratory factor analysis. We evaluated internal consistency, construct validity, cross-informant reliability, and test-retest reliability of the trimmed

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2016 Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

4. Family Psychosocial Screening

Family Psychosocial Screening Family Psychosocial Screening Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Family Psychosocial (...) Screening Family Psychosocial Screening Aka: Family Psychosocial Screening From Related Chapters II. Description Assess parent risk factors for child behavior problems Parent physically abused as a child Parental Maternal depression Requires 10 minutes for parent to complete Score suggests referral or no referral III. Efficacy : >90% : >90% IV. Resources and References Kemper (1996) Ambulatory Child Health 4:325-39 Developmental and Behavioral Screening Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing

2018 FP Notebook

5. A systematic review of the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions at improving the psychological, social and physical wellbeing of family members affected by an adult relative's substance misuse

A systematic review of the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions at improving the psychological, social and physical wellbeing of family members affected by an adult relative's substance misuse Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears (...) criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening will be performed in two phases, namely initial screening based on title and abstract, followed by full-text screening of the eligible articles for final inclusion. In each phase, 2 observers will independently assess each article. Discrepancies will be resolved through discussion, or by consulting a third investigator. ">Procedure for study selection Example : Title-abstract screening: 1. Not an original full

2019 PROSPERO

6. Psychosocial, pharmacological, and legal interventions for improving the psychosocial outcomes of children with substance-misusing parents

analytical assumptions are satisfied, the proposed review will provide the first NMA that synthesises the relative impact of multiple interventions on the psychosocial outcomes for children with substance-misusing parents. INTERVENTION In order to conduct a NMA, this review will include all possible interventions that explicitly aim to improve the psychosocial wellbeing of families characterised by parental substance misuse. However, the focus of the review will be studies that examine the impact (...) and there will be no restrictions on the intervention setting or treatment format (e.g., inpatient, outpatient, community settings, family home, one-on-one or group settings). In addition, studies will be included if the intervention focuses on the misuse of alcohol, illicit drugs, and/or prescription drugs. Home-Visiting Home-visiting interventions are characterised by regular home visits by health practitioners or paraprofessionals and aim to improve the psychosocial and health outcomes for mothers and infants (Segal et al

2016 Campbell Collaboration

7. Perceived Family Functioning Predicts Baseline Psychosocial Characteristics in U.S. Participants of a Family Focused Grief Therapy Trial. (PubMed)

Perceived Family Functioning Predicts Baseline Psychosocial Characteristics in U.S. Participants of a Family Focused Grief Therapy Trial. Screening and baseline data on 170 American families (620 individuals), selected by screening from a palliative care population for inclusion in a randomized controlled trial of family-focused grief therapy, were examined to determine whether family dysfunction conferred higher levels of psychosocial morbidity. We hypothesized that greater family dysfunction (...) assessment device supported the concurrent accuracy of the FRI.As predicted, significantly greater levels of individual psychosocial morbidity were present in American families whose functioning as a group was poorer. Support was generated for a clinical approach that screens families to identify those at high risk. Overall, these baseline data point to the importance of a family-centered model of care.Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

2017 Journal of pain and symptom management

8. Family psychosocial risk screening guided by the Pediatric Psychosocial Preventative Health Model (PPPHM) using the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT). (PubMed)

Family psychosocial risk screening guided by the Pediatric Psychosocial Preventative Health Model (PPPHM) using the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT). Although families of children with cancer and other serious medical conditions have documented psychosocial needs, the systematic identification of needs and delivery of evidence-based care remain challenges. Screening for multifaceted family psychosocial risk is a means by which psychosocial treatment needs for pediatric patients (...) . As an example of a means by which families can be screened early in the treatment process, PAT scores and corresponding PPPHM levels can provide direction for the delivery of evidence-based psychosocial care.

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2015 Acta Oncologica

9. Investigating the Two-Tiered System of Psychosocial Cancer Care in Brazil Using a Distress Screening Measure (PubMed)

Investigating the Two-Tiered System of Psychosocial Cancer Care in Brazil Using a Distress Screening Measure 28717735 2019 01 13 2378-9506 3 1 2017 Feb Journal of global oncology J Glob Oncol Investigating the Two-Tiered System of Psychosocial Cancer Care in Brazil Using a Distress Screening Measure. 1-6 10.1200/JGO.2016.004978 Bergerot Cristiane Decat CD , , , and , Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, São Paulo, SP; , Universidade de Brasília, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e (...) are found at the end of this article.The following represents disclosure information provided by authors of this manuscript. All relationships are considered compensated. Relationships are self-held unless noted. I = Immediate Family Member, Inst = My Institution. Relationships may not relate to the subject matter of this manuscript. For more information about ASCO's conflict of interest policy, please refer to www.asco.org/rwc or ascopubs.org/jco/site/ifc. Cristiane Decat BergerotNo relationship

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2016 Journal of global oncology

10. Impact of Psychosocial Risk on Outcomes among Families Seeking Treatment for Obesity. (PubMed)

decrease in BMI z-score. Compared with children of families with low psychosocial risk, children of families with moderate or high psychosocial risk were 3.1 times (95% CI, 1.3-7.2 times) more likely to be lost to follow-up and 2.9 times (95% CI, 1.1-7.9 times) more likely to have a non-clinically meaningful change in BMI z-score.Children presenting with increased psychosocial risk have higher attrition and poorer weight outcomes, supporting the need for psychosocial screening as a standard component (...) Impact of Psychosocial Risk on Outcomes among Families Seeking Treatment for Obesity. To test the hypothesis that children with elevated psychosocial risk would have increased attrition and worse weight outcomes in weight management treatment.This was a prospective cohort study of 100 new patients, aged 4-12 years, in a weight management clinic. Parents completed the Psychosocial Assessment Tool. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to calculate the odds of attrition from the clinic

2018 Journal of Pediatrics

11. Psychosocial problems in traumatized refugee families: overview of risks and some recommendations for support services (PubMed)

Psychosocial problems in traumatized refugee families: overview of risks and some recommendations for support services This article is an abridged version of a report by an advisory council to the German government on the psychosocial problems facing refugee families from war zones who have settled in Germany. It omits the detailed information contained in the report about matters that are specific to the German health system and asylum laws, and includes just those insights and strategies (...) that may be applicable to assisting refugees in other host countries as well. The focus is on understanding the developmental risks faced by refugee children when they or family members are suffering from trauma-related psychological disorders, and on identifying measures that can be taken to address these risks. The following recommendations are made: recognizing the high level of psychosocial problems present in these families, providing family-friendly living accommodations, teaching positive

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2018 Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health

12. Psychosocial Factors in Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs and Their Families. (PubMed)

to screen for, evaluate, and promote psychosocial health to increase protective factors and ameliorate risk factors. Medical home teams can promote protective psychosocial factors as part of coordinated, comprehensive chronic care for CYSHCN and their families. A team-based care approach may entail collaboration across the care spectrum, including youth, families, behavioral health providers, specialists, child care providers, schools, social services, and other community agencies. The purpose (...) Psychosocial Factors in Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs and Their Families. Children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and their families may experience a variety of internal (ie, emotional and behavioral) and external (ie, interpersonal, financial, housing, and educational) psychosocial factors that can influence their health and wellness. Many CYSHCN and their families are resilient and thrive. Medical home teams can partner with CYSHCN and their families

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2018 Pediatrics

13. Psychosocial impact on mothers receiving expanded newborn screening results. (PubMed)

Psychosocial impact on mothers receiving expanded newborn screening results. Expanded newborn screening (NBS) for genetic disorders has improved diagnosis of numerous treatable diseases, positively impacting children's health outcomes. However, research about the psychological impact of expanded NBS on families, especially mothers, has been mixed. Our study examined associations between maternal experiences of expanded NBS and subsequent psychosocial functioning and parenting stress in mothers (...) anxiety, stress and depression. However, FP mothers experienced lower levels of stress related to their own health compared to TN group. Two potential trends were also identified; results suggested TN mothers might experience higher levels of isolation than mothers in the TP group and that FP mothers might report higher stress levels in relation to spousal relationships compared to the TN group. FP mothers seemed to report similar or better levels of psychosocial functioning than TN mothers. Our

2018 European Journal of Human Genetics

14. The psychosocial impact of undergoing prostate cancer screening for men with BRCA1/2 mutations. (PubMed)

The psychosocial impact of undergoing prostate cancer screening for men with BRCA1/2 mutations. To report the baseline results of a longitudinal psychosocial study that forms part of the IMPACT study, a multi-national investigation of targeted prostate cancer (PCa) screening among men with a known pathogenic germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.Men enrolled in the IMPACT study were invited to complete a questionnaire at collaborating sites prior to each annual screening visit (...) significantly to variance in IES scores than genetic status.This is the first study to report the psychosocial profile of men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations undergoing PCa screening. No clinically concerning levels of general or cancer-specific distress or poor quality of life were detected in the cohort as a whole. A small subset of participants reported higher levels of distress, suggesting the need for healthcare professionals offering PCa screening to identify these risk factors and offer additional

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2018 BJU international

15. Assessment tools for screening and clinical evaluation of psychosocial aspects in addictive disorders (PubMed)

Assessment tools for screening and clinical evaluation of psychosocial aspects in addictive disorders This article provides an overview of the tools for psychosocial assessment of substance use disorders. Various psychosocial factors need to be assessed for effective management of individuals and to carry out research in the field. These factors include socio-demographic characteristics, neuropsychological functions, psychiatric co-morbidities, psychological vulnerabilities such as personality (...) traits, motivation, and cognitions related to drug use, and the psychosocial functioning of the individual and his family. The various tools used to assess these aspects have been outlined below and the brief descriptions provided can help in choosing the right tool based on the characteristics that need to be measured and logistics.

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2018 Indian journal of psychiatry

16. Psychosocial Factors of Health Professionals' Intention to Use a Decision Aid for Down Syndrome Screening: Cross-Sectional Quantitative Study. (PubMed)

Psychosocial Factors of Health Professionals' Intention to Use a Decision Aid for Down Syndrome Screening: Cross-Sectional Quantitative Study. Decisions about prenatal screening for Down syndrome are difficult for women, as they entail risk, potential loss, and regret. Shared decision making increases women's knowledge of their choices and better aligns decisions with their values. Patient decision aids foster shared decision making but are rarely used in this context.One of the most promising (...) met the inclusion criteria: family physicians, 55.2% (171/310); obstetrician-gynecologists, 33.8% (105/310); and midwives, 11.0% (34/310). Of these, 80.9% were female (251/310). Mean age was 39.6 (SD 11.5) years. Less than half were aware of any decision aids at all. In decreasing order of importance, factors influencing their intention to use a decision aid for Down syndrome prenatal screening were as follows: self-identity (beta=.325, P<.001), attitude (beta=.297, P<.001), moral norm (beta=.288

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2018 Journal of medical Internet research

17. Do Recommendations by Healthcare Providers, Family-members, Friends, and Individual Self-Efficacy Increase Uptake of Hepatitis B Screening? Results of a Population-Based Study of Asian Americans (PubMed)

Do Recommendations by Healthcare Providers, Family-members, Friends, and Individual Self-Efficacy Increase Uptake of Hepatitis B Screening? Results of a Population-Based Study of Asian Americans Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection disproportionately affects Asian Americans but HBV screening rates among Asian American are substantially low. This study examines the impact of multiple recommendations and self-efficacy on HBV screening uptake among Asian Americans.Data for this study were from 872 (...) Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese recruited for a liver cancer prevention program in the Washington D.C - Baltimore metropolitan area.410 (47%) respondents reported previous HBV screening. Only 19.8% recalled a physician recommendation. Higher level of HBV screening was reported among people who had physician recommendation, family member recommendation or friend recommendation. Perceived self-efficacy was also an important predictor to HBV screening. The effect of self-efficacy was significant

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2017 International journal of MCH and AIDS

18. Cognitive behavioural therapy plus standard care versus standard care plus other psychosocial treatments for people with schizophrenia. (PubMed)

of schizophrenia. Other psychosocial therapies that are often less expensive are also available as an add-on treatment for people with schizophrenia. This review is also part of a family of Cochrane Reviews on CBT for people with schizophrenia.To assess the effects of CBT compared with other psychosocial therapies as add-on treatments for people with schizophrenia.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study Based Register of Trials (latest 6 March, 2017). This register is compiled by systematic (...) or any other psychosocial therapy. Outcomes of interest included relapse, global state, mental state, adverse events, social functioning, quality of life and satisfaction with treatment. We included trials meeting our inclusion criteria and reporting useable data.We reliably screened references and selected trials. Review authors, working independently, assessed trials for methodological quality and extracted data from included studies. We analysed dichotomous data on an intention-to-treat basis

2018 Cochrane

19. Recommendations for the Delivery of Psychosocial Oncology Services in Ontario

is psychosocial oncology care important? | 13 The impact of cancer on patients and their families is far reaching. Throughout the cancer care continuum - from screening and diagnosis, through treatment and survivorship or palliative care - many patients will experience concerns with not only their physical health but also their emotional, social, mental health and wellbeing issues (7-9) . Throughout the continuum, there are also unique needs associated with the adolescent and young adult and the elderly (...) available will help ensure that patients and families access services when needed. 22 | Organization and Structure of the PSO Program Figure 4: Psychosocial oncology: A specialized supportive care service Supportive Care Frontline Supportive Care • Initiation and maintenance of therapeutic relationships and skills in provision of information, psychoeducation, and normalizing concerns • Frontline screening and assessment (e.g. oncologists, oncology nurses, radiation therapists) • Responding to distress

2018 Cancer Care Ontario

20. Psychosocial interventions for addiction-affected families in Low and Middle Income Countries: A systematic review. (PubMed)

Psychosocial interventions for addiction-affected families in Low and Middle Income Countries: A systematic review. To review the literature on psychosocial interventions for addiction affected family members in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC).A systematic review with a detailed search strategy focussing on psychosocial interventions directed towards people affected by addiction without any gender, year or language specifications was conducted. Identified titles and abstracts were (...) screened; where needed full papers retrieved, and then independently reviewed. Data was extracted based on the aims of the study, to describe the modalities, acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of the interventions.Four papers met our selection criteria. They were published between 2003 and 2014; the total sample size was 137 participants, and two studies were from Mexico and one each from Vietnam and Malaysia. The predominantly female participants comprised of parents, spouses and siblings

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2017 Addictive behaviors

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