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203 results for

Failure to Thrive in the Elderly

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161. Strongyloidiasis (Overview)

local cutaneous involvement, or both. During chronic uncomplicated infections, the larvae may migrate to the skin, where they can cause cutaneous strongyloidiasis, known as larva currens because of the quick migratory rate of the larva. Infection is clinically characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and urticarial rash. In malnourished children, strongyloidiasis remains an important cause of chronic diarrhea, cachexia, and failure to thrive. This condition can also be a health (...) the preleukemic phase of HTLV-1 infection [ ] ; the Strongyloides antigen accelerates leukemogenesis, and treatment of the infection may actually decrease HTLV-1 viral load [ ] Hypogammaglobulinemia Malignancy/neoplasms, particularly hematologic malignancies (lymphoma, leukemia): Studies have suggested that Strongyloides infection may be associated with increased incidence of gastrointestinal lymphoma [ ] Organ transplantation [ , , , ] and malnutrition Chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

162. Down Syndrome (Follow-up)

to control hypersecretion in the airways. Other airway complications include subglottic stenosis and obstructive apnea, which may result from a relatively large tongue, enlarged adenoids, and midfacial hypoplasia. Adenotonsillectomy may be performed to manage obstructive sleep apnea. Previous Next: Diet and Activity No special diet is required, unless celiac disease is present. A balanced diet and regular exercise are needed to maintain appropriate weight. Feeding problems and failure to thrive usually (...) an echocardiogram if a new murmur or gallop or symptoms of heart failure develop. Continue subacute bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis in adolescents with cardiac defects; during adolescence, an additional 2% of patients die of complications of congenital heart disease, infections, leukemia, and accidents Counsel regarding the importance of protecting the cervical spine during anesthetic or surgical interventions; monitor for signs and symptoms of cervical myopathy; repeat cervical spine radiography as needed

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

163. Atrial Septal Defect, Ostium Primum (Follow-up)

septal defects (ASDs) and partial atrioventricular (AV) canal defects is operative repair. Its timing has been debated over the years; more recent reports encourage a trend toward earlier repair. Patients with an isolated ostium primum ASD are typically referred for elective repair between the ages of 2 and 5 years. Occasionally, repair may be recommended at an earlier age because of significant congestive heart failure (CHF) or failure to thrive, especially if associated with significant mitral (...) syndrome manifested by chest pain, fever, pericardial inflammation with a rub, and pericardial effusion. High-dose salicylates or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) generally improve symptoms. Hemodynamically significant effusions may require pericardiocentesis. Failure to respond to salicylates may warrant pulsed steroid therapy. Diet and activity For asymptomatic patients, no specific dietary recommendations are warranted. For infants or very young children with congestive heart failure

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

164. Strongyloides Stercoralis (Diagnosis)

passage, its local cutaneous involvement, or both. During chronic uncomplicated infections, the larvae may migrate to the skin, where they can cause cutaneous strongyloidiasis, known as larva currens because of the quick migratory rate of the larva. Infection is clinically characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and urticarial rash. In malnourished children, strongyloidiasis remains an important cause of chronic diarrhea, cachexia, and failure to thrive. This condition can also (...) with Strongyloides shortens the preleukemic phase of HTLV-1 infection [ ] ; the Strongyloides antigen accelerates leukemogenesis, and treatment of the infection may actually decrease HTLV-1 viral load [ ] Hypogammaglobulinemia Malignancy/neoplasms, particularly hematologic malignancies (lymphoma, leukemia): Studies have suggested that Strongyloides infection may be associated with increased incidence of gastrointestinal lymphoma [ ] Organ transplantation [ , , , ] and malnutrition Chronic renal failure and end

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

165. Mononucleosis (Diagnosis)

. It is estimated that 1-3% of college students are affected annually. In children younger than 4 years, the infection is most often asymptomatic, but they may present with atypical symptoms (eg, irritability, failure to thrive, abdominal pain due to mesenteric adenopathy or splenomegaly, upper respiratory infection [URI] symptoms). Elderly patients with Epstein-Barr virus infection usually present with nonspecific complaints (eg, fever, fatigue, malaise, myalgias). Previous Next: Prognosis Infectious (...) -Barr virus. Mortality/Morbidity Fatalities secondary to infectious mononucleosis (IM) are rare and most often are the result of splenic rupture. Other fatal occurrences have been attributed to secondary bacterial infection, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Airway obstruction can occur due to massive edema of the Waldeyer ring. Serious nonfatal complications also are rare and may include involvement of the CNS or the hematologic system. CNS complications can include meningitis, encephalitis

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

166. Strongyloides Stercoralis (Overview)

passage, its local cutaneous involvement, or both. During chronic uncomplicated infections, the larvae may migrate to the skin, where they can cause cutaneous strongyloidiasis, known as larva currens because of the quick migratory rate of the larva. Infection is clinically characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and urticarial rash. In malnourished children, strongyloidiasis remains an important cause of chronic diarrhea, cachexia, and failure to thrive. This condition can also (...) with Strongyloides shortens the preleukemic phase of HTLV-1 infection [ ] ; the Strongyloides antigen accelerates leukemogenesis, and treatment of the infection may actually decrease HTLV-1 viral load [ ] Hypogammaglobulinemia Malignancy/neoplasms, particularly hematologic malignancies (lymphoma, leukemia): Studies have suggested that Strongyloides infection may be associated with increased incidence of gastrointestinal lymphoma [ ] Organ transplantation [ , , , ] and malnutrition Chronic renal failure and end

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

167. Mononucleosis (Overview)

. It is estimated that 1-3% of college students are affected annually. In children younger than 4 years, the infection is most often asymptomatic, but they may present with atypical symptoms (eg, irritability, failure to thrive, abdominal pain due to mesenteric adenopathy or splenomegaly, upper respiratory infection [URI] symptoms). Elderly patients with Epstein-Barr virus infection usually present with nonspecific complaints (eg, fever, fatigue, malaise, myalgias). Previous Next: Prognosis Infectious (...) -Barr virus. Mortality/Morbidity Fatalities secondary to infectious mononucleosis (IM) are rare and most often are the result of splenic rupture. Other fatal occurrences have been attributed to secondary bacterial infection, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Airway obstruction can occur due to massive edema of the Waldeyer ring. Serious nonfatal complications also are rare and may include involvement of the CNS or the hematologic system. CNS complications can include meningitis, encephalitis

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

168. Scrub Typhus (Treatment)

, ocular pain, wet cough, malaise, and injected conjunctiva Centrifugal macular rash on the trunk Enlargement of the spleen, cough, and delirium Pneumonitis or encephalitis Central nervous system (CNS), pulmonary, or cardiac involvement Rarely, acute renal failure, shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) See for more detail. Diagnosis Laboratory studies in patients with scrub typhus may reveal the following: Early lymphopenia with late lymphocytosis Decreased CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio (...) of scrub typhus varies with the climate in different countries because the mites are able to thrive as conditions change. The mites prefer the rainy season and certain areas (eg, forest clearings, riverbanks, and grassy regions). In the past few years, cases have been noted earlier in the season because of increased mite activity as the weather warms. [ ] Areas in which mites thrive pose a greater risk to humans. The prevalence of scrub typhus in Japan has been rising, and much of the current research

2014 eMedicine.com

169. Assistive Devices to Improve Independence (Treatment)

> Geriatric Rehabilitation Updated: Mar 19, 2019 Author: Julie A Muché, MD; Chief Editor: Stephen Kishner, MD, MHA Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Geriatric Rehabilitation Overview Overview As we age, we face many physical and emotional changes that can affect our level of function and well-being. Our baby-boomer population is aging, and people are living longer. We must maintain functional independence in the elderly and address the needs of our older generation. Rehabilitation (...) of geriatric patients is imperative for the patients' well-being and for society, so that we can thrive socially and economically. [ ] Essential to geriatric rehabilitation is communication, specifically improving any sensory impairment, including those related to vision and hearing. The prevention of falls and osteoporosis can protect the patient's health and improve longevity. Addressing malnutrition can promote healing and vitalize the patient to participate in a formal rehabilitation program

2014 eMedicine.com

170. World Kidney Day 2011

say about their quality of life with optimal dialysis. Kt/v is less important than a patient's ability to live the life they wish to live. Why are professionals in the kidney community espousing a treatment (<4hrs/3x per week) that few or none would choose for themselves? Personally, I would opt for every other day nocturnal and I am not afraid to say so. Most nephs today are simply not used to dealing with thriving dialysis patients. Sadly, disability has become commonly accepted, but working (...) little resources to provide adequate dialysis. I have come across a number of patients on home hemo and in general they have done well. However, the majority of our patients these days are elderly and frail and are not necessarily suitable for home dialysis. Similarly, there are compliance issues, if a patient is motivated and reliable, then home hemo could be ideal but this is not always the case. That said, I welcome your comments and agree that we could all be doing better. This can only benefit

2011 Renal Fellow Network

171. Eviplera - emtricitabine / rilpivirine / tenofovir disoproxil

chromatography IAS-USA International AIDS Society-United States of America ICH International Conference on Harmonization IC50 50% inhibitory concentration IDV indinavir ITT intent-to-treat Ki inhibition constant LDL low-density lipoprotein LOCF last observation carried forward LPV lopinavir LPV/r lopinavir/ritonavir M = F missing = failure MAA (EU) Marketing Authorization Application MCS mental component summary MDCK Madin-Darby canine kidney MDRD modification of diet in renal disease MITT modified intent (...) -to-treat MRP (2,4) multidrug resistance protein (type 2, type 4) mtDNA mitochondrial DNA NC = F noncompleter = failure NNRTI nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor non-VF non-virologic failure NRTI nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor NtRTI, N(t)RTI nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor NVP nevirapine PBMC peripheral blood mononuclear cell PCS Physical Component Summary P-gp P-glycoprotein PI protease inhibitor PK pharmacokinetic PMPA 9-R-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine PP per

2011 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

172. Edurant - rilpivirine

(type 1, type 3) HOMA-IR homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance HPLC high-performance liquid chromatography IAS-USA International AIDS Society-United States of America ICH International Conference on Harmonization IC50 50% inhibitory concentration IDV indinavir ITT intent-to-treat Ki inhibition constant LDL low-density lipoprotein LOCF last observation carried forward LPV lopinavir LPV/r lopinavir/ritonavir M = F missing = failure MAA (EU) Marketing Authorization Application MCS mental (...) component summary MDCK Madin-Darby canine kidney MDRD modification of diet in renal disease MITT modified intent-to-treat MRP (2,4) multidrug resistance protein (type 2, type 4) mtDNA mitochondrial DNA NC = F noncompleter = failure NNRTI nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor non-VF non-virologic failure NRTI nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor NtRTI, N(t)RTI nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor NVP nevirapine PBMC peripheral blood mononuclear cell PCS Physical Component Summary P-gp

2011 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

173. Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Clinical Practice Guidelines

in infants with regurgitation or vomiting Bilious vomiting Gastrointestinal bleeding Hematemesis Hematochezia Consistently forceful vomiting Onset of vomiting after 6months of life Failure to thrive Diarrhea Constipation Fever Lethargy Hepatosplenomegaly Bulging fontanelle Macro/microcephaly Seizures Abdominal tenderness or distension Documented or suspected genetic/metabolic syndrome 506 NASPGHAN/ESPGHAN PEDIATRIC GER GUIDELINE COMMITTEE J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, Vol. 49, No. 4, October

2009 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

174. Preventing and Managing Violence in the Workplace

’ Association of Ontario It is with great pleasure that the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) releases the Preventing and Managing Violence in the Workplace Healthy Work Environments Best Practice Guideline. This is one of a series of Best Practice Guidelines (BPGs) on Healthy Work Environments (HWEs) developed by the nursing community to date. The aim of these guidelines is to provide the best available evidence to support the creation of healthy and thriving work environments

2009 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

176. Unintentional Weight Loss

Unintentional Weight Loss Aka: Unintentional Weight Loss , Geriatric Failure to Thrive , Cachexia , Wasting Syndrome , Malnutrition , Anorexia From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology: Incidence residents: 25-40% Overall over age 64 years: 13% III. Definition Unintentional Weight Loss of >5% of body weight within 6-12 months IV. Causes See V. Precautions Substantial weight loss should not be attributed to aging alone See VI. History How much weight loss over how much time? Patients down play weight changes (...) See See See or VII. Exam Record accurate weights on same scale at every visit Unexplained weight loss >5% should be investigated Anticipated time for 15% weight loss Complete starvation: 15% of weight lost in 3 weeks Half of normal food intake: 3 months Half food intake and comorbid conditions: 3 weeks clues (BMI) predicts mortality in elderly Women: BMI <22 kg/m2 predicts increased mortality Men: BMI <23.5 kg/m2 predicts increased mortality Head and neck changes Thyromegaly Other examination

2015 FP Notebook

177. Pharmacologic-based strategies for smoking cessation: clinical and cost-effectiveness analyses

are often the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine gum 16 : The common brand names are Nicorette and Thrive. It is available in low strength (2 mg) or full strength (4 mg). It is recommended that the gum be chewed slowly for 30 minutes. Most people typically use nine to 12 pieces of gum per day during the first month of treatment. It is recommended that daily use not exceed 24 pieces per day. The dose and duration of therapy may need to be titrated to reflect the nicotine needs and other clinical (...) circumstances of smoking patients. According to the product monograph, the use of this product typically lasts 12 weeks. The reported side effects include mouth, teeth, or jaw problems; headache; heartburn; sweating; diarrhea; dizziness; hiccups; nausea; vomiting; and trouble sleeping. Nicotine lozenge 17 : The common brand names are the Nicorette and Thrive lozenges. The lozenge is supplied in low strength (2 mg) or full strength (4 mg). The use of one piece every one to two hours (minimum of eight

2010 EvidenceUpdates

178. Carglumic acid (Carbaglu)

to 233 µmol/L (normal plasma ammonia = 50 µmol/L). During this same hospitalization, she became febrile and developed pneumonia. She required mechanical ventilation and (b) (b) (6) (b) (6) (b) (6)Clinical Review Virginia Elgin, M.D. and Helen Sile, M.D NDA 22-562/S-000 Carbaglu (carglumic acid) 17 experienced multi-organ system failure with encephalopathy leading to her death. was an 11 year-old female who experienced an acute episode of hyperammonemia (419 µmol/L) in December 2007 as a consequence

2010 FDA - Drug Approval Package

179. Buprenorphine Transdermal System (Butrans)

that the applicant include in the ISS analyses of electrocardiographic intervals. The applicant has analyzed the ECG data and in addition submitted a thorough QT study. Deficiency #59 required information to justify a dose titration interval of three days. This deficiency was resolved prior to this submission when the FDA agreed that three days was an appropriate dose titration interval. Deficiency #60 required a repeat abuse liability study to correct failures in the design of the first study. However (...) 21-306 BuTrans TM (Buprenorphine Transdermal System) 46 patch removal/application information in their diary. Subjects were to have been provided three BTDS 10 patches (2 patches for the 10-day treatment and 1 extra). Subjects were to have worn BTDS 5 for three days. At three days subjects were to have been contacted by the staff and those subjects not able to tolerate BTDS 5 were to have been discontinued from the study and considered Run-in Failure. Subjects able to tolerate BTDS 5 were to have

2010 FDA - Drug Approval Package

180. Vpriv - velaglucerase alfa

) Type 1 GD is the most common subtype affecting an estimated 30,000 people worldwide, and patients display a wide range of symptoms, including splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, bone complications. Type 2 GD presents in infancy and is characterised by a rapid neurodegenerative course with widespread visceral involvement. Failure to thrive and stridor due to laryngospasm are commonly observed, and death due to progressive psychomotor degeneration occurs within the first 2 to 3

2010 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

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