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Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes

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21. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report Although bilateral facial nerve palsy is a rare condition, its etiology is more detectable than the unilateral type. A temporal bone fracture is one cause of bilateral facial nerve palsy, contributing in 3% of the cases.Here, we report the case of a 35-year-old man complaining of bilateral incomplete eye closure, two weeks after a closed head injury caused by a motor vehicle accident.The high resolution computed (...) tomography findings revealed a bilateral temporal bone fracture line, which extended to the fallopian canal. With regard to treatment, near complete recovery was obvious after two weeks of treatment with oral corticosteroids. Overall, bilateral facial palsy is hard to diagnose; therefore, clinical suspicion and the early detection of facial nerve injuries is necessary for good nerve recovery in temporal bone fractures.

2016 Archives of trauma research

22. Facial nerve paralysis in children Full Text available with Trip Pro

Facial nerve paralysis in children Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery (...) traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

2015 World journal of clinical cases

23. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature Full Text available with Trip Pro

sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed (...) Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have

2015 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

24. Idiopathic Non-traumatic Facial Nerve Palsy (Bell’s Palsy) in Neonates; An Atypical Age and Management Dilemma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Idiopathic Non-traumatic Facial Nerve Palsy (Bell’s Palsy) in Neonates; An Atypical Age and Management Dilemma Idiopathic (Bell's) palsy is the commonest cause of unilateral facial paralysis in children. Although being idiopathic by definition, possible infectious, inflammatory, and ischemic triggers have been suggested. Bell's palsy is thought to be responsible for up to three-fourths of cases of acute unilateral facial paralysis worldwide. The diagnosis has to be reached after other causes (...) of acute peripheral palsy have been excluded. However, it is rarely described in neonates and young infants. Steroids may have some role in treatment, but antiviral therapies have doubtful evidence of benefit. Prognosis is good, though residual dysfunction is occasionally encountered. We report the case of a two-week-old neonate with no prior illnesses who presented with acute left facial palsy. Clinical findings and normal brain imaging were consistent with the diagnosis of Bell's palsy. The patient

2018 Oman medical journal

25. Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes

Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Facial Nerve Paralysis (...) Causes Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes Aka: Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes , Cranial Nerve 7 Paralysis Causes , Bell's Palsy Differential Diagnosis From Related Chapters II. Causes: General is idiopathic Below are listed other causes of III. Causes: Common Peripheral nerve causes (Facial muscle paralysis with forehead affected) Otits Media or Autoimmune (e.g. , typically bilateral) Head or Lesion (e.g. ) Central/Supranuclear causes (Facial muscle paralysis with forehead spared) Cerebral mass lesion (e.g

2015 FP Notebook

26. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC)-like squamous cell carcinoma as a differential diagnosis to Bell´s palsy: review of guidelines for refractory facial nerve palsy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC)-like squamous cell carcinoma as a differential diagnosis to Bell´s palsy: review of guidelines for refractory facial nerve palsy Bell´s palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis worldwide and the most common disorder of the cranial nerves. It is a diagnosis of exclusion, accounting for 60-75% of all acquired peripheral facial nerve palsies. Our case shows the first case of a microcystic adnexal carcinoma-like squamous cell carcinoma as a cause (...) of facial nerve palsy.The patient, a 70-year-old Caucasian male, experienced subsequent functional impairment of the trigeminal and the glossopharyngeal nerve about 1½ years after refractory facial nerve palsy. An extensive clinical work-up and tissue biopsy of the surrounding parotid gland tissue was not able to determine the cause of the paralysis. Primary infiltration of the facial nerve with subsequent spreading to the trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerve via neuroanastomoses was suspected. After

2017 Journal of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

27. Intratympanic Stereoidal Injections for Facial Nerve Palsy

loss is well rehearsed in many practices, similar management of facial nerve palsy due to Bell's phenomenon is rare and a few researches have been conducted regarding the subject. In this research we suggest intratympanic injections for these patients as a treatment for Bell's palsy. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Bell Palsy Drug: Dexamethasone Not Applicable Detailed Description: Bell's palsy is defined as a facial nerve paralysis without any other known diagnosis or cause .Its (...) Center Information provided by (Responsible Party): Hillel Yaffe Medical Center Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Bell's palsy is defined as a facial nerve palsy without any other known cause. The common practice for this disease consists of the use of oral steroids. Such treatment can cause harm to people who have disabilities or prior conditions such as pregnancies, diabetes, obesity and/or high blood pressure. While the use of intratympanic injection for sudden sensory hearing

2017 Clinical Trials

28. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report. (Abstract)

Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report. Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication

2014 British Dental Journal

29. Facial Nerve Paralysis, Static Reconstruction

Facial Nerve Paralysis, Static Reconstruction Static Reconstruction for Facial Nerve Paralysis: Overview, Indications, Clinical Presentation Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTI4OTM0OC1vdmVydmlldw (...) == processing > Static Reconstruction for Facial Nerve Paralysis Updated: Nov 17, 2015 Author: Dean R Cerio, MD; Chief Editor: Jorge I de la Torre, MD, FACS Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Static Reconstruction for Facial Nerve Paralysis Overview Overview Facial paralysis is a debilitating condition that is often associated with dramatic functional, psychological, and cosmetic sequelae. Varied functional deficits pose significant physiologic challenges. The inability to express oneself

2014 eMedicine Surgery

30. Facial Nerve Paralysis

to facial nerve paralysis, most often correlated to acute otitis media or externa. Slow-onset facial nerve palsy is observed in patients with cholesteatoma. Noninfectious causes Noninfectious causes of facial nerve palsy include head trauma affecting the intracranial intratemporal course of the facial nerve or, less commonly, the infratemporal course, as seen in facial blunt or sharp injury. [ ] Iatrogenic injury to the facial nerve most often is seen after cervicofacial rhytidectomies, surgery (...) vicinity of the facial nerve often are concomitant with facial nerve palsy. In general, gradual onset of paralysis may lead to suspicion of a tumor as the cause. However, several authors have demonstrated a sudden onset of facial nerve palsy in patients with tumors (20-27%). [ , ] Summary of causes The causes of facial nerve palsy are summarized in Table 1, below. Table 1. Causes of Facial Nerve Palsy in a Review of Medical Literature (1900-1990)* Birth Molding Forceps delivery Dystrophia myotonica

2014 eMedicine Surgery

31. Facial Nerve Paralysis, Dynamic Reconstruction

etiologies (17%). The study included almost 2000 patient records. [ ] Bell palsy , an idiopathic form of facial paralysis, is a diagnosis of exclusion. Eighty percent of patients with facial paralysis suffer from Bell palsy. (Trauma is the second most common cause of facial paralysis.) Eighty-five percent of these patients begin to recover nerve function spontaneously within 3 weeks of onset; the other 15% do not have any movement for 3-6 months. If the patient has Bell palsy, the potential for complete (...) Facial Nerve Paralysis, Dynamic Reconstruction Dynamic Reconstruction for Facial Nerve Paralysis: Overview, Anatomy of the Facial Nerve, Etiology in Prognosis and Treatment Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Surgery

32. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like (...) . In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively.

2016 Journal of Audiology & Otology

33. Peripheral facial paralysis

sclerosis). Assess whether the facial paralysis has a central or a peripheral cause. With a central cause, only the lower half of the facial musculature is affected. Assessment: ? asymmetry of the face; ? function of the facial musculature; ? function of the other cranial nerves; ? coordination and strength of arms and legs; ? meningeal irritation (e.g. neck stiffness). If peripheral facial paralysis is diagnosed, then examine: ? the ear, the auditory canal and the mucous membranes of mouth and tongue (...) to a neurologist: - if there is a suspicion of a central cause of the facial paralysis; - if there is a failure of multiple cranial nerves; - if there are neurological alarm symptoms. ? Refer to an ENT physician: - if a cause of the facial paralysis cannot be sufficiently ruled out; - if there are ENT alarm symptoms; - if recovery has not started within one month or in the event of insufficient recovery after three months. ? Refer to ophthalmologist as an emergency in the event of redness, pain in the eye

2010 Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG)

34. Assessment of cranial nerve mononeuropathy

with paralysis of adduction, elevation, and depression, and when the pupil is involved a large unreactive pupil is noted. This presentation can suggest serious neurological disorders, namely subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebral aneurysms, uncal herniation, or meningitis, so prompt recognition and evaluation is needed. The fourth cranial nerve innervates the superior oblique muscle, which controls depression, intorsion, and adduction of the eye. It is the most common cause of vertical diplopia. The frequency (...) of fourth nerve palsy is difficult to report accurately, but in one large series it was more common than both oculomotor and abducens palsies. Holmes JM, Mutyala S, Maus TL, et al. Pediatric third, fourth, and sixth nerve palsies: a population-based study. Am J Ophthalmol. 1999;127:388-392. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10218690?tool=bestpractice.com Richards BW, Jones FR Jr, Younge BR. Causes and prognosis in 4,278 cases of paralysis of the oculomotor, trochlear, and abducens cranial nerves. Am J

2018 BMJ Best Practice

35. Anesthesia mumps resulting in temporary facial nerve paralysis after the auditory brainstem implantation in a 3-year-old child. (Abstract)

Anesthesia mumps resulting in temporary facial nerve paralysis after the auditory brainstem implantation in a 3-year-old child. An acute transient sialadenitis of the major salivary glands in the early postoperative period is called 'anesthesia mumps'. It has been reported in different surgical procedures especially in neurosurgical procedures. Anesthesia mumps develops very fast after the extubation period but it usually regresses with no sequelae within a few hours. However, sometimes serious (...) complication can occur such as respiratory distress. In this report, we present a 3-year-old girl with an anesthesia mumps and facial palsy occurring after successful auditory brainstem implantation and we discuss the cause and the management of this rare complication in this report. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

2013 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

36. Modified Stennert’s Protocol in Treating Acute Peripheral Facial Nerve Paralysis: Our Experience Full Text available with Trip Pro

Modified Stennert’s Protocol in Treating Acute Peripheral Facial Nerve Paralysis: Our Experience The aim of this study was to know the effect of modified Stennert's protocol on Bell's palsy and delayed onset post traumatic facial nerve paralysis. Retrospective study method which included 26 patients was done. Of this 19 patients had Bell's palsy and seven patients had delayed onset post traumatic facial nerve paralysis. All patients started on modified Stennert's protocol. Nineteen patients (...) were observed and had idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. Fifteen patients showed clinical improvement by the 10th day and by the end of 1 month, 18 patients showed significant symptomatic improvement. One patient had residual defects at 6 months. Of the seven patients with delayed onset post traumatic facial nerve paralysis, three patients had to undergo facial nerve decompression, the remaining four receiving only modified Stennert's protocol. Improvement was seen in three patients by the 10th day

2012 Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery

37. Hemihypoglossal nerve transfer for acute facial paralysis. (Abstract)

Hemihypoglossal nerve transfer for acute facial paralysis. The authors have developed a technique for the treatment of facial paralysis that utilizes anastomosis of the split hypoglossal and facial nerve. Here, they document improvements in the procedure and experimental evidence supporting the approach.They analyzed outcomes in 36 patients who underwent the procedure, all of whom had suffered from facial paralysis following the removal of large vestibular schwannomas. The average period (...) of paralysis was 6.2 months. The authors used 5 different variations of a procedure for selecting the split nerve, including evaluation of the split nerve using recordings of evoked potentials in the tongue.Successful facial reanimation was achieved in 16 of 17 patients using the cephalad side of the split hypoglossal nerve and in 15 of 15 patients using the caudal side. The single unsuccessful case using the cephalad side of the split nerve resulted from severe infection of the cheek. Procedures using

2012 Journal of Neurosurgery

38. Diabetic Mice Show an Aggravated Course of Herpes-Simplex Virus-Induced Facial Nerve Paralysis. (Abstract)

Diabetic Mice Show an Aggravated Course of Herpes-Simplex Virus-Induced Facial Nerve Paralysis. Bell's palsy is highly associated with diabetes mellitus.The cause of Bell's palsy in diabetes mellitus is not completely understood. Diabetic mononeuropathy or reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be responsible for the facial paralysis seen in diabetic patients. We previously reported transient and ipsilateral facial paralysis in mice inoculated with HSV-1. In this study, we (...) increased in the diabetic mice. Electrophysiologic examinations and histopathologic changes also revealed that the facial nerve damage was more severe in the diabetic group.The aggravated course of HSV-1 infection in diabetes suggests that HSV-1 may be the main causative factor for the increased incidence of facial paralysis in diabetic patients.

2012 Otology and Neurotology

39. WITHDRAWN: Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis). (Abstract)

WITHDRAWN: Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis). Inflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action which should minimise nerve damage and thereby improve the outcome of patients suffering from this condition.The objective of this review was to assess the effect of steroid therapy in the recovery of patients with Bell's palsy.We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group (...) concealment was appropriate in two trials, and the data reported allowed an intention-to-treat analysis. The data included in the meta-analyses were collected from three trials with a total of 117 patients. Overall 13/59 (22%) of the patients allocated to steroid therapy had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months after randomisation, compared with 15/58 (26%) in the control group. This reduction was not significant (relative risk 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 1.59). The reduction

2009 Cochrane

40. Facial Nerve Laceration and its Repair Full Text available with Trip Pro

Facial Nerve Laceration and its Repair Facial paralysis is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic and psychosocial consequences. Tumors within or outside the skull, Bell's palsy and trauma are the most common causes of facial paralysis in adults.Our patient was a 35-year-old man with deep laceration wounds. The patient was taken to the operating room and the nerves were repaired. We observed gradual improvement of muscle performance except branches of the frontal (...) nerve.Complete rupture of the facial nerve is challenging and the treatment is surgery, which requires careful planning.

2016 Trauma monthly

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