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Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes

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1. Cross-Face Nerve Grafting versus Masseteric-to-Facial Nerve Transposition for Reanimation of Incomplete Facial Paralysis: A Comparative Study Using the FACIAL CLIMA Evaluating System. (PubMed)

Cross-Face Nerve Grafting versus Masseteric-to-Facial Nerve Transposition for Reanimation of Incomplete Facial Paralysis: A Comparative Study Using the FACIAL CLIMA Evaluating System. Incomplete facial paralysis is still a challenge because we must restore what is missing without causing damage to what has recovered. The current literature is insufficient, with a small number of cases. The use of nerve transfers has gained recent popularity for reanimating facial palsy. The authors present (...) a comparative study between cross-face nerve grafting and masseteric-to-facial nerve transposition for incomplete facial paralysis.Twenty-eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with either cross-face nerve grafting (group I, n = 10) or masseteric nerve transfer (group II, n = 18). Commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were measured using the FACIAL CLIMA dystem. Spontaneity of the movement and satisfaction were also assessed.When comparing

2018 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

2. For Whom the Bell's Toll: Recurrent Facial Nerve Paralysis, A Retrospective Study and Systematic Review of the Literature. (PubMed)

., Bell's palsy); however, a subset harbor neoplastic causes or local manifestations of underlying systemic disease. A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation is warranted in patients presenting with recurrent facial nerve paralysis and therapeutic considerations including facial nerve decompression can be considered in select cases. (...) For Whom the Bell's Toll: Recurrent Facial Nerve Paralysis, A Retrospective Study and Systematic Review of the Literature. To examine the etiology, clinical course, and management of recurrent peripheral facial nerve paralysis.Retrospective review at a single tertiary academic center and systematic review of the literature. Clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging findings, treatment and outcome for all cases of recurrent ipsilateral, recurrent contralateral, and bilateral simultaneous

2019 Otology and Neurotology

3. Determining Etiology of Facial Nerve Paralysis With MRI: Challenges in Malignancy Detection. (PubMed)

Determining Etiology of Facial Nerve Paralysis With MRI: Challenges in Malignancy Detection. Compare experts' ability to differentiate malignant and benign causes of facial nerve paralysis (FNP) using the initial presenting magnetic resonance image (MRI) for each patient.This retrospective case-controlled study compared MRIs for 9 patients with a malignant cause for FNP, 8 patients with Bell's palsy, and 9 cochlear implant patients serving as controls. The initial presenting MRI for each (...) condition was used such that raters were evaluating real-world rather than optimal studies. Three blinded expert raters independently evaluated each segment of the facial nerve for abnormalities, provided a diagnosis, and graded MRI quality. Cohen's and Light's kappa were used to calculate interrater reliability and overall index of agreement, respectively.MRI protocols for the malignancy group were universally suboptimal. There was poor agreement among raters for abnormalities of the facial nerve along

2019 Rhinology and Laryngology

4. For Whom the Bell's Toll: Recurrent Facial Nerve Paralysis, A Retrospective Study and Systematic Review of the Literature. (PubMed)

., Bell's palsy); however, a subset harbor neoplastic causes or local manifestations of underlying systemic disease. A comprehensive diagnostic evaluation is warranted in patients presenting with recurrent facial nerve paralysis and therapeutic considerations including facial nerve decompression can be considered in select cases. (...) For Whom the Bell's Toll: Recurrent Facial Nerve Paralysis, A Retrospective Study and Systematic Review of the Literature. To examine the etiology, clinical course, and management of recurrent peripheral facial nerve paralysis.Retrospective review at a single tertiary academic center and systematic review of the literature. Clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging findings, treatment and outcome for all cases of recurrent ipsilateral, recurrent contralateral, and bilateral simultaneous

2019 Otology and Neurotology

5. Facial Nerve Hematoma After Penetrating Middle Ear Trauma: A Cause of Delayed Facial Palsy. (PubMed)

Facial Nerve Hematoma After Penetrating Middle Ear Trauma: A Cause of Delayed Facial Palsy. Penetrating middle ear injury may cause hearing loss, vertigo, or facial nerve injury, although facial nerve paralysis followed by head trauma is a rare condition. In this study, we report a case of a 3-year-old patient with delayed facial palsy on the left side that developed 4 days after an accidental tympanic membrane perforation caused by a cotton-tipped swab. Otoendoscopic examination revealed (...) facial nerve in the tympanic portion caused hematoma within the fallopian canal, resulting in delayed facial nerve palsy.

2019 Pediatric Emergency Care

6. Masseteric Nerve Transfer for Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. (PubMed)

Masseteric Nerve Transfer for Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. A review of the role of masseteric nerve transfer is needed to guide its use in facial reanimation.To systematically review the available literature, and, when applicable, analyze the combined outcomes of masseteric nerve transfer to better define its role in reanimation and to guide further research.Two independent researchers conducted the review using PubMed-NCBI and Scopus literature databases (...) articles met inclusion criteria with a total of 183 patients undergoing masseteric nerve transfer. From those studies, there were a total of 183 patients who underwent masseteric nerve transfer. There were 85 men and 98 women with a mean (SD) age of 43 (12.2) years and mean (SD) follow up examination after surgery of 22 (7.6) months. Mean (SD) duration of nerve paralysis was 14 (6) months. Most common cause of paralysis was cerebellopontine angle tumors (81%). Six studies coapted the masseteric nerve

2017 JAMA facial plastic surgery

7. Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes

Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Facial Nerve Paralysis (...) Causes Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes Aka: Facial Nerve Paralysis Causes , Cranial Nerve 7 Paralysis Causes , Bell's Palsy Differential Diagnosis From Related Chapters II. Causes: General is idiopathic Below are listed other causes of III. Causes: Common Peripheral nerve causes (Facial muscle paralysis with forehead affected) Otits Media or Autoimmune (e.g. , typically bilateral) Head or Lesion (e.g. ) Central/Supranuclear causes (Facial muscle paralysis with forehead spared) Cerebral mass lesion (e.g

2018 FP Notebook

8. Oncocytoma of the Parotid Gland with Facial Nerve Paralysis (PubMed)

nerve was pinched by the enlarged tumor. Ischemia and strangulation of the nerve were considered to be the cause of the facial nerve paralysis associated with the benign tumor in this case. (...) Oncocytoma of the Parotid Gland with Facial Nerve Paralysis Parotid gland tumor with facial nerve paralysis is strongly suggestive of a malignant tumor. However, several case reports have documented benign tumors of the parotid gland with facial nerve paralysis. Here, we report a case of oncocytoma of the parotid gland with facial nerve paralysis. A 61-year-old male presented with pain in his right parotid gland. Physical examination demonstrated the presence of a right parotid gland tumor

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2018 Case reports in otolaryngology

9. Multislice Computed Tomography in Cases With Facial Nerve Paralysis Due to Temporal Bone Trauma

complications.About one fourth has complete paralysis. Condition or disease Facial Nerve Paralysis Detailed Description: Facial nerve paralysis might have variable etiologies apart from idiopathic Bell's palsy, Congenital, infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, neurological, toxic, iatrogenic and atraumatic causes. Surgical intervention is indicated if 90-95% loss of function is seen at the very early period on Electroneuronography or if there is axonal degeneration on Electromyography lately with no sign (...) Multislice Computed Tomography in Cases With Facial Nerve Paralysis Due to Temporal Bone Trauma Multislice Computed Tomography in Cases With Facial Nerve Paralysis Due to Temporal Bone Trauma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2018 Clinical Trials

10. Periauricular Keloids on Face-Lift Scars in a Patient with Facial Nerve Paralysis (PubMed)

Periauricular Keloids on Face-Lift Scars in a Patient with Facial Nerve Paralysis Keloids are caused by excessive scar formation that leads to scar growth beyond the initial scar boundaries. Keloid formation and progression is promoted by mechanical stress such as skin stretch force. Consequently, keloids rarely occur in paralyzed areas and areas with little skin tension, such as the periauricular region. Therefore, periauricular incision is commonly performed for face lifts. We report a rare (...) case of keloids that arose from face-lift scars in a patient with bilateral facial nerve paralysis. A 51-year-old Japanese man presented with abnormal proliferative skin masses in bilateral periauricular scars. Seventeen years before, he had a cerebral infarction that resulted in permanent bilateral facial nerve paralysis. Three years before presentation, the patient underwent face-lift surgery with periauricular incisions. We diagnosed multiple keloids. We removed the masses surgically, closed

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2017 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

11. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis after peritonsillar infiltration of bupivacaine: a case report. (PubMed)

Peripheral facial nerve paralysis after peritonsillar infiltration of bupivacaine: a case report. Peritonsillar infiltration of a local anesthetic solution for reduction of posttonsillectomy pain is commonly used although the benefit and complications of this technique have not yet been well established. We report a case of a 4-year-old boy who developed peripheral facial nerve paralysis after perioperative infiltration of bupivacaine and uneventful tonsillectomy. The paralysis was noticed (...) a few minutes after extubation and resolved completely after 8 hours. We assumed this to be caused by the direct action of the local anesthetic agent on the facial nerve.

2017 American Journal of Otolaryngology

12. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging for exposing facial nerve zonal vulnerability to microbleeds: A rare cause of facial palsy (PubMed)

High resolution magnetic resonance imaging for exposing facial nerve zonal vulnerability to microbleeds: A rare cause of facial palsy Background We report a case of hypertensive microbleeds strategically located at the attached segment (AS) and root entry zone (REZ) at the left facial nerve causing facial paralysis. Case Report A 60-year-old woman presented with sudden onset left facial paralysis. Medical history was significant for poorly controlled hypertension secondary to bilateral adrenal (...) facial nerve. The patient experienced only partial recovery from House-Brackmann grade IV facial paralysis at presentation to a House-Brackmann grade III facial paralysis at 1 year of follow up. Conclusions To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of facial paralysis caused by microbleeds directly affecting the vulnerable AS and REZ facial nerve segments. We discuss the zonal microanatomy of the facial nerve and the crucial role of high resolution MRI for diagnosis.

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2017 The neuroradiology journal

13. Facial Function Reanimation by Electrical Pacing in Unilateral Facial Paralysis.

Information Go to Layout table for additonal information Responsible Party: Tampere University Hospital ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Other Study ID Numbers: R15067 First Posted: April 12, 2018 Last Update Posted: April 12, 2018 Last Verified: March 2018 Layout table for additional information Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Keywords provided by Tampere University Hospital: facial nerve palsy facial paralysis functional electrical stimulation (...) facial pacing Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Facies Facial Paralysis Bell Palsy Facial Nerve Diseases Disease Attributes Pathologic Processes Mouth Diseases Stomatognathic Diseases Paralysis Neurologic Manifestations Nervous System Diseases Signs and Symptoms Herpesviridae Infections DNA Virus Infections Virus Diseases Cranial Nerve Diseases

2018 Clinical Trials

14. Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Facial Nerve Palsy and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (PubMed)

Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Facial Nerve Palsy and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome (MRS) is a rare disease characterized by persistent or recurrent orofacial oedema, relapsing peripheral facial paralysis, and furrowed tongue. Pathologically, granulomatosis is responsible for oedema of face, labia, oral cavity, and facial nerve. We present a patient with MRS admitted to our hospital with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). 45 (...) -year-old woman was admitted to an emergency department with dyspnea and swelling on her hands and face. She was intubated because of ARDS and accepted to intensive care unit (ICU). After weaning from ventilatory support, peripheral facial paralysis was diagnosed and steroid treatment was added to her therapy. On dermatologic examination, oedema on her face, pustular lesions on her skin, and fissure on her tongue were detected. The patient informed us about her recurrent and spontaneous facial

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2018 Case reports in neurological medicine

15. Facial Paralysis Following Core Needle Biopsy of a Deep Lobe Parotid Tumor: A Case Report. (PubMed)

Facial Paralysis Following Core Needle Biopsy of a Deep Lobe Parotid Tumor: A Case Report. To report a case of total facial paralysis as the result of a core needle biopsy.Case report and literature review.A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a deep lobe parotid tumor on computed tomography. During a core needle biopsy, he developed complete facial paralysis. The cause was discovered to be a direct stab injury to the main trunk of the facial nerve.When biopsying parotid lesions adjacent (...) to the main trunk of the facial nerve, the use of smaller-gauge needles and additional patient counseling should be considered.

2019 Rhinology and Laryngology

16. Corrigendum to "Effects of laser acupuncture in a patient with a 12-year history of facial paralysis: A case report" [Complement. Ther. Med. 43 (April) (2019) 306-310]. (PubMed)

Corrigendum to "Effects of laser acupuncture in a patient with a 12-year history of facial paralysis: A case report" [Complement. Ther. Med. 43 (April) (2019) 306-310]. Traumatic facial palsy, whether accidental or iatrogenic, is a common cause of facial paralysis. Laser acupuncture therapy (LAT) is a non-invasive, pain-free method to stimulate traditional acupuncture points with non-thermal laser irradiation. Low-level laser therapy has proven beneficial in the regeneration of peripheral (...) nerves. This case report describes the feasibility of this innovative treatment in a patient with a 12-year history of traumatic facial palsy and severe sequelae.A52-year-old male presented with a severe left-sided facial paralysis that had lasted for 12 years. At initial presentation, the man could not fully close his left eye and had difficulty eating solid foods. The paralysis of his left-sided facial muscles had resulted in dysarthria. He was administered 30 LAT sessions in the Acupuncture

2019 Complementary Therapies In Medicine

17. Using "Sugar-cane Chewing" Concept As The Directionality of Motor Neurotizer Selection for Facial Paralysis Reconstruction---Chang Gung Experiences. (PubMed)

Using "Sugar-cane Chewing" Concept As The Directionality of Motor Neurotizer Selection for Facial Paralysis Reconstruction---Chang Gung Experiences. Facial paralysis and postparalysis facial synkinesis both cause severe functional and aesthetic deficits. Functioning free muscle transplantation (FFMT) is our preferred method to reconstruct both deformities.From 1985 to 2017, a total of 392 patients underwent 403gracilis FFMTs for facial reanimation. Different motor neurotizers were used: cross (...) -face nerve graft (CFNG, 74%), spinal accessory (XI) nerve (17%) and masseter (V3) nerve (V3)(8%). Smile excursion score, cortical adaptation stage, patient's questionnaire, Hadlock's lip excursion, and Terzis's evaluation systems were used to assess outcomes.For smile excursion score, XI- and V3- group showed higher scores than CFNG- in the first two years, but no difference by three years follow-up. For cortical adaptation stage, nearly all CFNG- achieved stage IV or V spontaneity, XI- at least

2019 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

18. Effects of laser acupuncture in a patient with a 12-year history of facial paralysis: A case report. (PubMed)

Effects of laser acupuncture in a patient with a 12-year history of facial paralysis: A case report. Traumatic facial palsy, whether accidental or iatrogenic, is a common cause of facial paralysis. Laser acupuncture therapy (LAT) is a non-invasive, pain-free method to stimulate traditional acupuncture points with non-thermal laser irradiation. Low-level laser therapy has proven beneficial in the regeneration of peripheral nerves. This case report describes the feasibility of this innovative (...) -month period. His recovery was monitored by scores on the Facial Disability Index, the Sunnybrook Facial Nerve Grading System and measurements of the vertical palpebral distance in his left eye. Photographs were taken after every treatment. On the 10th treatment, a change in closure of the left eye was noticed and facial muscle strength was improved. After 22 treatments, the patient could fully close his left eye.LAT significantly improved the sequelae of long-term facial paralysis in this patient

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2019 Complementary Therapies In Medicine

19. Using the "Sugarcane Chewing" Concept as the Directionality of Motor Neurotizer Selection for Facial Paralysis Reconstruction: Chang Gung Experiences. (PubMed)

Using the "Sugarcane Chewing" Concept as the Directionality of Motor Neurotizer Selection for Facial Paralysis Reconstruction: Chang Gung Experiences. Facial paralysis and postparalysis facial synkinesis both cause severe functional and aesthetic deficits. Functioning free muscle transplantation is the authors' preferred method for reconstructing both deformities.From 1985 to 2017, a total of 392 patients underwent 403 gracilis functioning free muscle transplantations for facial reanimation (...) . Different motor neurotizers were used: cross-face nerve graft (74 percent), spinal accessory nerve (17 percent), and masseter nerve (8 percent). Smile excursion score, cortical adaptation stage, patient questionnaire, Hadlock lip excursion, and the Terzis evaluation systems were used to assess outcomes.For smile excursion score, the spinal accessory and masseter nerve groups showed higher scores than the cross-face nerve graft group in the first 2 years, but no difference by 3-year follow-up

2019 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

20. Iatrogenic Phenol Injury Causing Facial Paralysis With Tympanic Membrane and Ossicular Necrosis. (PubMed)

Iatrogenic Phenol Injury Causing Facial Paralysis With Tympanic Membrane and Ossicular Necrosis. To describe a serious iatrogenic injury and propose means of reducing the risk of its reoccurrence.A 21-year-old man who suffered facial paralysis, complete necrosis of the tympanic membrane, and ossicular discontinuity because of chemical burn from accidental application of copious amounts of topical anesthetic phenol into the ear.Conservative management of facial paralysis and delayed (...) reconstruction of the tympanic membrane and ossicular chain.Gradual recovery to grade 1/6 facial function, successful repair of the tympanic membrane, but persistent 30-dB conductive hearing loss after partial ossicular replacement prosthesis presumably because of scarring.Phenol is a highly toxic chemical, topically to both skin and eyes. Absorbed through the skin it can have lethal cardiotoxicity. It is also potent neurotoxin at concentrations much lower (4-7%) than used for tympanic membrane anesthesia

2016 Otology and Neurotology

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