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Fabella Syndrome

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1. A case report and literature review on fabella syndrome after high tibial osteotomy. (PubMed)

A case report and literature review on fabella syndrome after high tibial osteotomy. The fabella is a normal structure, but is occasionally reported to cause posterior knee pain. The aim of this study was to present fabella syndrome after high tibial osteotomy.A 55-year-old female patient was admitted to the hospital due to about 1 year and 8 months of left knee pain. Sclerosis was observed in the anterior margin of the fabella in the preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) T2 image, and reactive (...) bone marrow was found and was considered to be due to degeneration of the distal femur. Degenerative change (Kellgren and Lawrence-KL grade 2) of the left knee was observed, along with cartilage delamination corresponding to International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 4 in the patellofemoral joint.We present the first reported case of fabella syndrome in Korea, after high tibial osteotomy due to degenerative arthritis and varus deformity, rather than artificial joint surgery.We excised

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2018 Medicine

2. Fabella Syndrome Following De-Rotation Surgery to Correct a Femoral Malunion (PubMed)

Fabella Syndrome Following De-Rotation Surgery to Correct a Femoral Malunion The fabella is a sesamoid bone situated within the lateral head of the gastrocnemius tendon, close to the lateral femoral condyle, and adjoined to the fabellofibular ligament. It is a normal variant, found in up to 87% of patients. Fabella Syndrome describes traditionally posterolateral knee pain, occurring due to biomechanical pressure of the fabella against the lateral femoral condyle. Given its rarity, its diagnosis (...) is often overlooked. We present a case of Fabella Syndrome with a modified surgical excision technique and review of the literature.A thirty-four-year-old man presented with posterolateral knee pain following de-rotation surgery to correct a femoral malunion, from a previous femoral shaft fracture. Due to the patient's complex orthopaedic history, Fabella Syndrome was not initially diagnosed. Fabellectomy eliminated all symptoms of knee pain, with no limitations in knee function.Review

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2018 The open orthopaedics journal

3. Fabella Syndrome

Fabella Syndrome Fabella Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fabella Syndrome Fabella Syndrome Aka: Fabella (...) Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Definition: Fabella Sesamoid bone of lateral gastrocnemius Normal variant in 10-20% of patients Posterior to lateral femoral condyle III. Epidemiology More common in early teen years IV. Mechanism Friction of fabella on posterolateral femoral condyle V. Symptoms Slow, insidious pain onset Sharp, intermittent pain at posterolateral knee VI. Signs Localized tenderness over fabella Best examined with fully extended knee VII. Management Conservative therapy s Heel lifts

2018 FP Notebook

4. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Patients With Fabella Syndrome (PubMed)

Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Patients With Fabella Syndrome The fabella is a small sesamoid bone generally located in the tendon of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius behind the lateral condyle of the femur. Fabella syndrome is the occurrence of posterolateral knee pain associated with the fabella. It is a rare cause of knee pain that is often misdiagnosed. Fabella syndrome can be managed with conservative or surgical treatment. We applied radial extracorporeal shock (...) wave therapy as a new treatment strategy for fabella syndrome and achieved a successful outcome.

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2016 Annals of rehabilitation medicine

5. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature (PubMed)

Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking "sound" during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty (...) for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee

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2016 Case reports in orthopedics

6. A Comprehensive Review of the Fabella Bone (PubMed)

A Comprehensive Review of the Fabella Bone The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is embedded in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and often articulates directly with the lateral femoral condyle. It is present in 10-30% of the general population with a higher incidence in Asians. The fabella can lead to various pathologies such as fabella pain syndrome and common fibular nerve palsy. Conservative treatment involves physical therapy or injecting local anesthetics or steroids around (...) this bone. However, if symptoms persist, then a fabellectomy can be performed. Physicians should be aware of the fabella bone and the multiple pathologies associated with it in order to provide the best treatment and management for patients.

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2018 Cureus

7. The fabella syndrome - a rare cause of posterolateral knee pain: a review of the literature and two case reports. (PubMed)

The fabella syndrome - a rare cause of posterolateral knee pain: a review of the literature and two case reports. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the risks and benefits of non-operative treatment versus surgical excision of a fabella causing posterolateral knee pain. We performed a systematic review of literature and also present two case reports.Twelve publications were found in a PubMed literature review searching the word "fabella syndrome". Non-operative treatment and surgical (...) for posterolateral knee pain. The decision was made to undertake surgical excision of the fabella in both cases without complication.Both patients were examined 6 month and one year after surgery with the Tegner activity score, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and International Knee Documentation Committee Score (IKDC).Consistent posterolateral pain during exercise might indicate the presence of a fabella syndrome. Resecting the fabella can be indicated and is a minor surgical procedure with minimal risk

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2014 BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

8. Fabella Syndrome

Fabella Syndrome Fabella Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Fabella Syndrome Fabella Syndrome Aka: Fabella (...) Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Definition: Fabella Sesamoid bone of lateral gastrocnemius Normal variant in 10-20% of patients Posterior to lateral femoral condyle III. Epidemiology More common in early teen years IV. Mechanism Friction of fabella on posterolateral femoral condyle V. Symptoms Slow, insidious pain onset Sharp, intermittent pain at posterolateral knee VI. Signs Localized tenderness over fabella Best examined with fully extended knee VII. Management Conservative therapy s Heel lifts

2015 FP Notebook

9. Baker Cyst

in the posteromedial knee joint. [ ] Occasionally, a Baker cyst is suggested by the presence of multiple, calcified, loose bodies in the cyst (see the images below). Anteroposterior radiograph of the knee shows calcifications (arrowhead) overlying the medial tibial plateau. Lateral radiograph of the knee shows multiple calcified bodies (arrowhead) posterior to the knee, which is consistent with synovial osteochondromatosis. Rarely, a solitary loose body in a Baker cyst may mimic a fabella on a lateral radiograph (...) of the knee (see the image below). Lateral radiograph of the knee shows a calcified body (arrowhead), which appears to be a large fabella, posterior to the knee. However, on frontal radiograph (see the image below), the calcified body in the Baker cyst will be located behind the medial femoral condyle, whereas a fabella will be present behind the lateral femoral condyle. Anteroposterior radiograph of the knee shows that a calcified body (arrowhead) is overlying the medial femoral condyle, making a fabella

2014 eMedicine Radiology

10. Overload syndromes of the knee in adolescents: Sonographic findings (PubMed)

: semimembranous tendon enthesopathy and pes anserinus bursitis; to the lateral aspect: iliotibial band syndrome (runner's knee), popliteus and femoral biceps tendon enthesopathy; to the posterior aspect: fabella syndrome and medial gastrocnemius muscle tendon enthesopathy. Sonography plays a central role in the diagnosis and can also evaluate the evolution of diseases. This method is well accepted by the patients and by their parents, it does not involve exposure to X-rays and it is inexpensive. US imaging (...) Overload syndromes of the knee in adolescents: Sonographic findings Overload syndromes are caused by repetitive microtrauma, and the knee joint is most frequently affected in adolescents. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in almost all sports activities. Pathologies related to the anterior aspect of the knee are: femoropatellar pain, jumper's knee syndromes, Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome and patellar stress fractures; to the medial aspect

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2008 Journal of ultrasound

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