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Eye Foreign Body

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41. An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral buckling for retinal detachment repair (Full text)

An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral buckling for retinal detachment repair 29133656 2018 03 06 2018 11 13 1998-3689 65 11 2017 11 Indian journal of ophthalmology Indian J Ophthalmol An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral buckling for retinal detachment repair. 1215-1216 10.4103/ijo.IJO_545_17 Natarajan Sundaram S Department of Vitreo Retina and Uveitis, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. Nakhwa Chinmay (...) C Department of Vitreo Retina and Uveitis, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. D Silva Aylette Jude AJ Department of Vitreo Retina and Uveitis, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. eng Case Reports Journal Article India Indian J Ophthalmol 0405376 0301-4738 IM Adult Cilia Eye Foreign Bodies diagnosis etiology surgery Follow-Up Studies Humans Male Postoperative Complications diagnosis etiology surgery Retinal Detachment surgery Scleral Buckling adverse effects

2017 Indian journal of ophthalmology

42. Case of intraocular foreign body partly lodged in the ethmoid sinus (Full text)

, India. Singh Shishir Shekhar SS Vitreo Retina Surgeon, Retina Foundation, Ahmedabad, India. eng Case Reports Journal Article India Indian J Ophthalmol 0405376 0301-4738 IM Adult Ethmoid Sinus diagnostic imaging injuries Eye Foreign Bodies diagnosis etiology Eye Injuries, Penetrating complications diagnosis Humans Male Orbit diagnostic imaging injuries Tomography, X-Ray Computed Ultrasonography 2017 11 15 6 0 2017 11 15 6 0 2018 3 7 6 0 ppublish 29133673 IndianJOphthalmol_2017_65_11_1262_218049 (...) Case of intraocular foreign body partly lodged in the ethmoid sinus 29133673 2018 03 06 2018 11 13 1998-3689 65 11 2017 11 Indian journal of ophthalmology Indian J Ophthalmol Case of intraocular foreign body partly lodged in the ethmoid sinus. 1262-1263 10.4103/ijo.IJO_404_17 Nagpal Manish M Vitreo Retina Surgeon, Retina Foundation, Ahmedabad, India. Jain Hardik H Vitreo Retina Surgeon, Retina Foundation, Ahmedabad, India. Juneja Rakesh R Vitreo Retina Surgeon, Retina Foundation, Ahmedabad

2017 Indian journal of ophthalmology

43. EX VIVO MODEL FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF DRYWALL INTRAOCULAR FOREIGN BODIES ON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY. (PubMed)

was hyperdense on CT. All sizes studied were detectable on Day 0 of scanning. Mean intraocular drywall foreign body density was 171 ± 52 Hounsfield units (70-237) depending on fragment size. Intraocular drywall foreign body decreased in size whereas Hounsfield unit intensity increased over time.Drywall dissolves in the eye and becomes denser over time as air in the drywall is replaced by fluid. This study identified Hounsfield Units specific to intraocular drywall foreign body over time. (...) EX VIVO MODEL FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF DRYWALL INTRAOCULAR FOREIGN BODIES ON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY. The study was inspired after the authors encountered a patient with a penetrating globe injury due to drywall, who had retained intraocular drywall foreign body. Computed tomography (CT) was read as normal in this patient. Open globe injury with drywall has never been reported previously in the literature and there are no previous studies describing its radiographic

2017 Retina

44. Siderotic cataract with no signs of intraocular foreign body. (Full text)

ophthalmic examination did not show any retained intraocular foreign body. Histopathologic staining of the anterior capsule confirmed the presence of iron deposits and macrophages. Electroretinography examination performed in the postoperative period showed the changes characteristic of retinal degeneration in ocular siderosis.This case illustrates the importance of close monitoring of patients with a history of trauma or previous penetrating injury to the eye, even if there is no intraocular foreign (...) Siderotic cataract with no signs of intraocular foreign body. Ocular siderosis is a clinical condition induced by deposition of an iron-containing intraocular foreign body. We report a unique case of histopathologically proven lens siderosis in a young woman with a preceding history of trauma but no signs of retained intraocular foreign body.A 32-year-old woman presented with an opacified lens showing brownish deposits on the anterior capsule and underwent cataract surgery. Preoperative

2017 BMC Ophthalmology

45. Eyelid Foreign Body

: Eyelid Foreign Body , Periocular Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. Causes Shattered particles at work (nails, wood) Explosions (Gunshot, Fireworks) Projectiles (Shotguns, BB guns) III. Pathophysiology Foreign body may lodge in multiple soft tissues Lid Orbit Eyeball Immediate risks are to eyeball damage Depth of penetration is key IV. Management Immediate removal of penetrating foreign body Best performed by ophthalmologist Risk of globe penetration Transport to ophthalmologist with eye (...) protected Paper cup is taped over eye Avoids pressure on foreign body against eye Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Eyelid Foreign Body." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Traumatic Injury About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started

2018 FP Notebook

46. Corneal Foreign Body

Aka: Corneal Foreign Body , Cornea Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Usually clipped or broken metallic particles Particles embed in with significant force III. Management Check prior to removal Apply topical anesthetic to affected eye Attempt removal with sterile saline irrigation Flow directed toward foreign body may dislodge it Attempt removal with damp sterile cotton swab Attempt removal with 25 gauge needle tip (or similar spud) Brace hand against patient's face Position (...) 25 gauge needle parallel to the l surface, approaching from lateral aspect Use magnifying loops (or ) Gently flick out the foreign body Some use battery operated burr tool to remove ocular foreign bodies Many ophthalmologists do not recommend this due to the potential for significant l damage and scarring If unable to remove Eye Refer to Ophthalmology Prophylactic topical antibiotic coverage Apply 4 times daily until epithelium heals Analgesia for abrasions >3 mm long Long acting (e.g. .25

2018 FP Notebook

47. Conjunctival Foreign Body

Conjunctival Foreign Body Aka: Conjunctival Foreign Body , Conjunctiva Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. Causes Work related particles (drilling, Sanding) Environmental (Sand, Dirt) III. Symptoms Foreign body sensation "Trash in my eye" Foreign body feels as if it is moving Object usually lodged under upper lid and not mobile As patient blinks, different parts irritated IV. Exam Techniques Inferior Cul-de-sac foreign body Patient looks up while lower lid pulled down Superior Cul-de-sac foreign body (...) Conjunctival Foreign Body Conjunctival Foreign Body Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Conjunctival Foreign Body

2018 FP Notebook

48. Dry eye disease

. Craig JP, Nichols KK, Akpek EK, et al. TFOS DEWS II definition and classification report. Ocul Surf. 2017 Jul;15(3):276-83. http://www.theocularsurfacejournal.com/article/S1542-0124(17)30119-2/fulltext http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28736335?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam known underlying medical cause use of known causative medications corneal filaments ocular irritation/foreign body sensation ocular burning transient blurred vision tearing blepharitis/meibomianitis punctate epithelial (...) Dry eye disease Dry eye disease - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Dry eye disease Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: April 2018 Summary Tear film abnormalities and/or ocular surface inflammation often result from aqueous deficiencies or evaporative abnormalities. May be caused by various systemic diseases and medicines. Symptoms do not often correlate with signs. Slit-lamp examination and tear

2018 BMJ Best Practice

49. Eye trauma

, or radiation (ultraviolet or ionising). History and exam hyphaema ecchymosis severe eye pain blurred vision corneal abrasions corneal oedema corneal erosions sub-conjunctival haemorrhages conjunctival lacerations punctated epithelial erosions loss of sight excessive lacrimation conjunctival chemosis conjunctival hyperaemia corneal epithelial defect open globe injury eyelid burns photophobia diplopia miosis corneal stromal clouding iridodialysis conjunctival foreign body corneal foreign body Descemet's (...) Eye trauma Eye trauma - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Eye trauma Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary A leading cause of visual loss and blindness that frequently affects young people. Worldwide, there are approximately 1.6 million people blind from eye injuries, 2.3 million with bilateral visual impairment, and 19 million with unilateral visual loss. The injuries may be due

2018 BMJ Best Practice

50. Assessment of red eye

B, McGhee C. Acute angle closure glaucoma masquerading as systemic illness. BMJ. 1996 Aug 17;313(7054):413-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8761235?tool=bestpractice.com Differentials Trichiasis Entropion Ectropion Blepharitis Dry eye Corneal ulcer (bacterial, viral, or fungal) Contact lens-related red eye Keratitis Corneal foreign body Corneal abrasion Subtarsal conjunctival foreign body Allergic conjunctivitis Bacterial conjunctivitis Viral conjunctivitis Non-traumatic subconjunctival (...) Assessment of red eye Assessment of red eye - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice   Search  Assessment of red eye Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: August 2018 Summary Acute red eye is a common presenting complaint to primary care physicians. McDonnell PJ. How do general practitioners manage eye disease in the community? Br J Ophthalmol. 1988 Oct;72(10):733-6. https://bjo.bmj.com/content/bjophthalmol/72/10/733.full.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3191073

2018 BMJ Best Practice

51. Foreign bodies in genitalia – Time for POCUS!

Foreign bodies in genitalia – Time for POCUS! Foreign bodies in genitalia – Time for POCUS! : EDE Blog • January 31, 2018 • How’s that for a title! Books, lectures and plenty of other resources on foreign bodies would not be complete without at least one eye-catching image of a foreign body in an orifice where it clearly does not belong :). And there is often a bizarre story to go along with it. Admit it! Everyone has a grin on their face when such a pic flashes across the screen. Well

2018 EDE Blog

52. The Newport eye: design and initial evaluation of a novel foreign body training phantom. (PubMed)

The Newport eye: design and initial evaluation of a novel foreign body training phantom. To improve SHO confidence in corneal foreign body removal, a novel training phantom is proposed. This phantom is a polyvinyl and gelatine-based model, easily fabricated in the emergency department (ED). Use of the phantom results in a significant improvement in SHO confidence, and therefore, makes a useful, cost-effective adjunct for ED training.

2013 Emergency Medicine Journal

53. DRY EYE (Tear deficiency (KCS)

conjunctivitis medicamentosa secondary to long-term topical therapy Symptoms ocular irritation foreign body, gritty or burning sensationp presence of a stringy mucous discharge blurring of vision from epithelial disruption or (transiently) from mucus strands symptoms exacerbated by smoke, wind or heat symptoms usually bilateral; may not be described as a feeling of dryness associated symptoms of dry mouth, systemic disease (e.g. arthritis) Signs reduced tear meniscus at inferior lid margin (following (...) DRY EYE (Tear deficiency (KCS) Dry Eye (Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca, KCS) submit The College submit You're here: Dry Eye (Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca, KCS) Dry Eye (Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca, KCS) The CMGs are guidelines on the diagnosis and management of a range of common and rare, but important, eye conditions that present with varying frequency in primary and first contact care. Share options Aetiology The 2017 International Dry Eye Workshop (DEWS II) has provided the following definition

2018 College of Optometrists

54. An unusual foreign body in the eye (Full text)

An unusual foreign body in the eye 23867884 2013 10 17 2018 11 13 1757-790X 2013 2013 Jul 17 BMJ case reports BMJ Case Rep An unusual foreign body in the eye. 10.1136/bcr-2013-200144 bcr2013200144 Yeo Damien Chia Ming DC Department of Ophthalmology, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK. cm.yeo@doctors.org.uk eng Case Reports Journal Article 2013 07 17 England BMJ Case Rep 101526291 1757-790X IM Eye Foreign Bodies etiology Female Hair Humans Middle Aged 2013 7 23 6 0 2013 7 23 6 0 2013 10 18 6 0

2013 BMJ case reports

55. CRACKCast E022 – Red and Painful Eye

to perceive light V: Visual field testing Confrontational field testing (not accurate for small field cuts) But this rarely changes the ED management E: External examination Of both external eyes and surrounding structures (facial bone fracture, etc.) Globe position: exop/enophthalmos (proptosis) Conjugate gaze Periorbital soft tissues, bones, sensation i. Examination of upper a lower eyelids, including eversion*** Ensure no foreign body ii. Assess adjacent structures E: Extraocular muscle movement Assess (...) ) Hyperthyroidism (enlarged ocular muscles) Orbital emphysema or inflammation (retained foreign body) What are the causes of enophthalmos? Contralateral proptosis Penetrating globe injury causing vitreous extrusion 2) How to differentiate between bacterial vs. viral conjunctivitis? Still NO good evidence exists to distinguish between the two Weak positive LR of 3.1 for bacterial IF Sticking eyelids in the AM plus mucoid/purulent discharge 3) What are the causes of Anisocoria? Previous eye trauma Globe injury

2017 CandiEM

56. Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing

). Frequently reported symptoms included photophobia, lacrimation, foreign body sensation and blurred vision but there was little evidence to suggest any difference in these symptoms in people with or without a patch.Activities of daily living (ADL) were assessed in one study involving children. There was little difference in ADL with the exception of walking which was reported to be more difficult with a patch on: VAS 1.7 cm (SD 2.1) versus 0.3 cm (SD 0.7).Complication rates were low across studies (...) Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Discover Portal Discover Portal Wearing a patch after a scratch to the eye probably makes no difference to healing Published on 21 December 2016 doi: After a scratch or minor damage to the outer layer of the eye (corneal abrasion), wearing an eye patch is unlikely to reduce pain at 24 hours and might not lead to quicker healing

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

57. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation (Full text)

to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. (...) Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after

2016 Ocular oncology and pathology

58. Acute conjunctivitis and corneal foreign bodies secondary to tarantula hairs (Full text)

, Ont. kamiar.mireskandari@sickkids.ca. eng Case Reports Journal Article 2015 08 17 Canada CMAJ 9711805 0820-3946 AIM IM Animals Child, Preschool Conjunctivitis diagnosis Cornea Eye Foreign Bodies diagnosis Hair Humans Male Spiders 2015 8 19 6 0 2015 8 19 6 0 2016 6 28 6 0 ppublish 26283718 cmaj.150571 10.1503/cmaj.150571 PMC4754184 CLAO J. 2000 Apr;26(2):111-2 10810943 Cornea. 2000 May;19(3):393-4 10832706 Eye (Lond). 2004 May;18(5):540-3 15131691 Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1973 Jan;22(1):130-3 4684884 Can (...) Acute conjunctivitis and corneal foreign bodies secondary to tarantula hairs 26283718 2016 06 27 2018 11 13 1488-2329 188 3 2016 Feb 16 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne CMAJ Acute conjunctivitis and corneal foreign bodies secondary to tarantula hairs. 212-4 10.1503/cmaj.150571 Yang Yelin Y Faculty of Medicine (Yang), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont.; Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (Christakis, Mireskandari), University

2016 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal

59. A Rare Presentation of Two Cases of Metallic Intrascleral Foreign Body Entry through Upper Eyelid (Full text)

A Rare Presentation of Two Cases of Metallic Intrascleral Foreign Body Entry through Upper Eyelid Ocular injury secondary to foreign body remains an important cause of ocular morbidity with or without blindness in working population. Intraocular foreign body may have varied clinical presentation. Initially it may look an apparently normal eye followed by obvious ocular symptoms depending upon its location and degree of inflammation. It can result in partial or full thickness penetration (...) of sclera with or without involvement of posterior segment. We hereby present two cases of metallic intrascleral foreign body entry through upper lid in young carpenters following hammer and chisel injury. In case 1, Intrascleral location of foreign body was confirmed with X ray orbit and B scan ultrasonography while in case 2 the diagnosis of intrascleral foreign body was missed at the first visit to ophthalmology clinic Both the patients underwent exploratory surgeries where intrascleral metallic

2016 Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR

60. Violence-related periorbital trauma with a retained foreign body: a case report (Full text)

periorbital trauma, wherein a foreign body (a plastic pen cap) traversed the median wall of the maxillary sinus and penetrated the lower turbinate.A 19-year-old Caucasian man was referred to our department with localized pain and swelling in the left suborbital region following a physical fight in May 2014. A clinical examination revealed no abnormalities in his eyeballs or eye movement, palpation of the orbital contour revealed no fractures, and ophthalmological evaluation showed no evidence of diplopia (...) Violence-related periorbital trauma with a retained foreign body: a case report Orbital fracture usually occurs as a result of blunt orbital and facial trauma and may involve ocular injuries. International studies on orbital floor fracture show several differences in epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, surgical treatment modalities, and complication rates; therefore, any comparison should be made with caution. Here we describe an unusual case involving a 19-year-old man with violence-related

2016 Journal of medical case reports

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