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Extraglottic Device

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1. Extraglottic airway devices: technology update [Corrigendum] (PubMed)

Extraglottic airway devices: technology update [Corrigendum] [This corrects the article on p. 189 in vol. 10, PMID: 28860875.].

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2018 Medical devices (Auckland, N.Z.)

2. Modifiable and Nonmodifiable Factors Associated With Perioperative Failure of Extraglottic Airway Devices. (PubMed)

Modifiable and Nonmodifiable Factors Associated With Perioperative Failure of Extraglottic Airway Devices. Extraglottic airway device (EGA) failure can be associated with severe complications and adverse patient outcomes. Prior research has identified patient- and procedure-related predictors of EGA failure. In this retrospective study, we assessed the incidence of perioperative EGA failure at our institution and identified modifiable factors associated with this complication that may (...) was the most common type of failure. We also found that use of desflurane and use of smaller EGA sizes in adult patients were factors under the direct control of anesthesia clinicians associated with EGA failure. An increasing number of attempts at EGA placement was associated with later device failures. Our findings also confirm the association of EGA failure with previously identified patient- and procedure-related factors such as increased body mass index, male sex, and position other than supine.

2017 Anesthesia and Analgesia

3. Extraglottic airway devices: technology update (PubMed)

Extraglottic airway devices: technology update Extraglottic airway devices (EADs) have revolutionized the field of airway management. The invention of the laryngeal mask airway was a game changer, and since then, there have been several innovations to improve the EADs in design, functionality, safety and construction material. These have ranged from changes in the shape of the mask, number of cuffs and material used, like rubber, polyvinylchloride and latex. Phthalates, which were added (...) Society (DAS) formed the Airway Device Evaluation Project Team (ADEPT) to strengthen the evidence base for airway equipment and vet the new extraglottic devices. A preuse careful analysis of the design and structure may help in better understanding of the functionality of a particular device. In the meantime, the search for the ideal EAD continues.

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2017 Medical devices (Auckland, N.Z.)

4. Hemodynamic Study With PRAM of the Cardiovascular Response to the Positioning of the Extraglottic Device

Hemodynamic Study With PRAM of the Cardiovascular Response to the Positioning of the Extraglottic Device Hemodynamic Study With PRAM of the Cardiovascular Response to the Positioning of the Extraglottic Device - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100 (...) ). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Hemodynamic Study With PRAM of the Cardiovascular Response to the Positioning of the Extraglottic Device The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02918526 Recruitment Status : Unknown Verified September 2016 by Alessandro Di Filippo, Azienda

2016 Clinical Trials

5. Do mask aperture bars of extraglottic airway devices prevent prolapse of epiglottis causing airway obstruction? A randomized crossover trial in anesthetized adult patients. (PubMed)

Do mask aperture bars of extraglottic airway devices prevent prolapse of epiglottis causing airway obstruction? A randomized crossover trial in anesthetized adult patients. The study objective is to determine whether extraglottic airway devices (EADs) with or without mask aperture bars (MABs) result in similar anatomical positions in patients undergoing surgery.Prospective, randomized, crossover comparison of four extraglottic airway devices.Operating theatre at a large teaching hospital.Eighty

2016 Journal of clinical anesthesia

6. Extraglottic Device

Extraglottic Device Extraglottic Device Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Extraglottic Device Extraglottic Device Aka (...) : Extraglottic Device , Supraglottic Device , Laryngeal Mask , Laryngeal Mask Airway , LMA , Esophageal Tracheal Combitube , King Supraglottic Airway , I-Gel II. Preparations: Extraglottic Device - Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA, I-Gel) Preferred Extraglottic Device Used as bridge to definitive airway (especially as back-up for failed intubation, if no airway obstruction) LMA may be used as conduit to carry fiberoptic scope Some LMAs (intubating LMA, I-Gel) may be used as conduit to intubate Avoid removing

2018 FP Notebook

7. Retrograde Intubation with an Extraglottic Device in Place. (PubMed)

Retrograde Intubation with an Extraglottic Device in Place. The intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) is an extraglottic device with a high rate of successful ventilation and oxygenation. Most modern airway algorithms suggest using an extraglottic device as the first-line rescue technique for a failed airway in emergency airway management. Eventually, a more secure airway is needed if the extraglottic temporizing device is working well. Retrograde intubation is a surgical airway management

2015 Journal of Emergency Medicine

8. Radiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Compression in Patients With Extraglottic Airway Devices in Place. (PubMed)

Radiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Compression in Patients With Extraglottic Airway Devices in Place. Extraglottic airway devices (EADs) are now commonly placed for airway management of critically ill or injured patients, particularly by emergency medical services providers in the out-of-hospital setting. Recent literature has suggested that EADs may cause decreased cerebral blood flow due to compression of the arteries of the neck by the devices' inflated cuffs.The authors identified (...) , there is insufficicent evidence to recommend against the use of extraglottic airways in the emergency setting on the basis of carotid artery compression.© 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

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2015 Academic Emergency Medicine

9. Prehospital endotracheal intubation vs extraglottic airway device in blunt trauma. (PubMed)

Prehospital endotracheal intubation vs extraglottic airway device in blunt trauma. The objective of the study is to compare outcomes in blunt trauma patients managed with prehospital insertion of an extraglottic airway device (EGD) vs endotracheal intubation (ETI). The null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in mortality for the 2 groups.This is a retrospective study of blunt trauma patients with Glasgow Coma Scale score less than or equal to 8 transported by ground emergency

2015 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

10. Inconsistent size nomenclature in extraglottic airway devices. (PubMed)

Inconsistent size nomenclature in extraglottic airway devices. Extraglottic airway devices (EADs) are frequently used airway devices, yet often they seal poorly, resulting in a functionally unacceptable leak. Optimal size selection of the EAD is therefore critical to the safe and effective use of an EAD. This review is designed to delineate the sizing recommendations of EADs and indicate the differences in order to make the optimal choice for device effectiveness and patient safety.We searched

2014 Minerva anestesiologica

11. Magnetic resonance imaging study of the in vivo position of the extraglottic airway devices i-gelâ„¢ and LMA-Supremeâ„¢ in anaesthetized human volunteers. (PubMed)

Magnetic resonance imaging study of the in vivo position of the extraglottic airway devices i-gelâ„¢ and LMA-Supremeâ„¢ in anaesthetized human volunteers. Exact information on the anatomical in situ position of extraglottic airway (EGA) devices is lacking. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the positions of the i-gel™ and the LMA-Supreme™ (LMA-S) relative to skeletal and soft-tissue structures.Twelve volunteers participated in this randomized, prospective, cross-over study (...) . Native MRI scans were performed before induction of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced, and the two EGAs were inserted in a randomized sequence. Their positions were assessed functionally, optically by fibrescope, and with MRI scans of the head and neck.The LMA-S protruded deeper into the upper oesophageal sphincter than the i-gel™ (P<0.001). Both devices reduced the area of the glottic aperture (P<0.001), and the LMA-S had the largest effect (P=0.049). The i-gel™ significantly compressed

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2012 British Journal of Anaesthesia

12. Extraglottic Device

Extraglottic Device Extraglottic Device Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Extraglottic Device Extraglottic Device Aka (...) : Extraglottic Device , Supraglottic Device , Laryngeal Mask , Laryngeal Mask Airway , LMA , Esophageal Tracheal Combitube , King Supraglottic Airway , I-Gel II. Preparations: Extraglottic Device - Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA, I-Gel) Preferred Extraglottic Device Used as bridge to definitive airway (especially as back-up for failed intubation, if no airway obstruction) LMA may be used as conduit to carry fiberoptic scope Some LMAs (intubating LMA, I-Gel) may be used as conduit to intubate Avoid removing

2015 FP Notebook

13. Use of extraglottic airways in patients undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery without the need for tracheal intubation. (PubMed)

Use of extraglottic airways in patients undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery without the need for tracheal intubation. Second generation extraglottic airway devices with gastric access and separate breathing channels have ushered in a new era where their use is increasingly prevalent in surgical patients who would have been traditionally intubated for general anesthesia. New innovations like the i-gel, which is constructed of a thermoplastic elastomer, provide an airtight seal around (...) with the i-gel of 0.06 (0.03) versus 0.04 (0.02) with the LMAS, P=0.013. Three patients (8.6%) with LMAS had mild sore throat; one patient (2.9%) had mucosal injury. No complications were documented in the i-gel group.Both these extraglottic airway devices offer similar OLPs, high insertion success rates at the first attempt with similar ease and insertion times (albeit longer gastric tube insertion with i-gel). Both provided effective ventilation despite a higher leak fraction with i-gel

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2013 Saudi journal of anaesthesia

14. Evolution of the Extraglottic Airway: A Review of Its History, Applications, and Practical Tips for Success. (PubMed)

Evolution of the Extraglottic Airway: A Review of Its History, Applications, and Practical Tips for Success. The development of the laryngeal mask airway in 1981 was an important first step toward widespread use and acceptance of the extraglottic airway (EGA). The term extraglottic is used in this review to encompass those airways that do not violate the larynx, in addition to those with a supraglottic position. Although the term extraglottic may be broad and include airways (...) such as tracheostomy tubes, the term supraglottic does not describe a large number of devices with subglottic components and is too narrow for a discussion of modern devices. EGAs have flourished in practice, and now a wide variety of devices are available for an ever-expanding array of applications. In this review we attempt to clarify the current state of EGA devices new and old, and to illustrate their use in numerous settings. Particular attention is paid to the use of EGAs in special situations

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2011 Anesthesia and Analgesia

15. Tracheal Malplacement of the King LT Airway May Be an Important Cause of Prehospital Device Failure. (PubMed)

Tracheal Malplacement of the King LT Airway May Be an Important Cause of Prehospital Device Failure. The King LT airway (King Systems, Noblesville, IN) is a popular extraglottic device that is widely used in the prehospital setting. We report a case of tracheal malplacement of the King airway with a severe kink in the distal tube.A 51-year-old unhelmeted motorcyclist collided with a freeway median and was obtunded when paramedics arrived. After bag mask ventilation, a King airway was placed (...) balloons were deflated, and the King airway was removed; the patient was orotracheally intubated without complication. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: The King airway is a valuable prehospital airway that can be placed quickly and blindly with high success rates by inexperienced providers; the King airway, however, is not without complication. Ventilation was not impaired in this patient, but tracheal malplacement may be an important cause of prehospital device failure. If a first

2016 Journal of Emergency Medicine

16. Laryngeal tube as airway rescue device from prehospital tracheostomy: a case report. (PubMed)

Laryngeal tube as airway rescue device from prehospital tracheostomy: a case report. Airway management is a priority for the critically ill patient. The insertion of a cuffed tracheal tube is the best practice to obtain an airway control; however, it is associated with many practical problems in prehospital trauma care. When this common procedure is not available, it can be substituted by an extraglottic airway. We report the case of a 54-year-old victim of a multi-vehicle collision brought (...) with a transport ventilator. The transfer to the hospital took 20 minutes with SpO(2) level of 99% and end tidal carbon dioxide not above 42 mmHg. The patient was properly ventilated by the LT during the computed tomography scan investigations. Due to the impossibility of endotracheal intubation the patient underwent surgical tracheostomy as suggested by the ear nose throat surgeon consultant. This case suggests that LT could be an important alternative device for airway management in trauma patients after

2012 Minerva anestesiologica

17. CRACKCast E192 – Airway

are the predictors of difficulty in the following situations: intubation, BVM, extraglottic device, surgical airway. Intubation (LEMON) – Box 1.1 Look Externally Evaluate 3-3-2 Mallampati Obstruction/Obesity Neck Mobility Also consider Cormack Lehane grade – Higher Grade = higher difficulty! Grade 1: Full view of the glottis Grade 2a: Partial view of the glottis with view of arytenoids and cords First pass success drops significantly from 2a to 2b. Grade 2b: only the arytenoids are seen Grade 3: only epiglottis (...) seen Grade 4: neither glottis nor epiglottis seen. Bag valve mask ventilation (MOANS) – Box 1.2 Mask seal (beard!) Obesity/OSA/obstructe Age >55y No Teeth Stiffness (resistance to ventilation) Extraglottic device (RODS) – Box 1.3 Restricted mouth opening Obstructed/obesity Distorted anatomy Stiffness (resistance to ventilation) Cricothyroidotomy (SMART) – Box 1.4 Surgery Mass (abscess/hematoma) Access/anatomy problems (obesity, edema) Radiation Tumor [4] What are the physiologic predictors

2018 CandiEM

18. Video laryngoscopes to help intubation in people with difficult airways

scenarios, most clinicians selected a preference of direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh blade (85%), followed by video laryngoscope (38%) and bougie-assisted direct laryngoscopy (20%). Back-up devices used by clinicians if their primary intubation strategy was unsuccessful were: extraglottic device (59%) followed by percutaneous cricothyrotomy (5%). Strengths and limitations Gives an estimate of video laryngoscope use in Canada specific to emergent endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients (...) . The inno innovativ vative aspects e aspects are that the devices use an integrated camera and video display monitor to provide an indirect view of the airway. The intended use intended use would be in people of any age who need tracheal intubation, but there are anticipated difficulties in visualising the glottis. It could be used in emergency or secondary care settings. The main points from the e main points from the evidence vidence summarised in this briefing are from 9 studies (4 systematic reviews

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

19. Ambu® Aura-ITM Versus Ambu Aura GainTM for Fiberoptic Intubation in Children

Ages Eligible for Study: 18 Months to 6 Years (Child) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: ASA I-II age 1.5 - 6 years minor surgery extraglottic airway device Exclusion Criteria: age (<18 months, >6 years) weight (<10 kg, >20 kg) a known difficult airway risk of aspiration Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using (...) Posted : January 26, 2018 See Sponsor: Schulthess Klinik Collaborator: Medical University Innsbruck Information provided by (Responsible Party): Christian Keller, Schulthess Klinik Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The investigators test the hypothesis that fiberoptic intubation (time and success rate) differ between the Ambu® Aura-ITM and Ambu Aura GainTM in paralyzed anaesthetized pediatric patients Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Anesthesia Device: Ambu Aura

2018 Clinical Trials

20. Comparison of iLTS and LMA Fastrach in a Simulated Airway.

participant obtained a standardized instruction of each device. In the proposed clinical trial the primary study objective will be to determine whether there is a difference in time to ventilation via endotracheal tube (seconds) for the novel iLTS-D compared to the LMA Fastrach. Time to Ventilation will be defined from when the tip of the extraglottic airway device passed the incisors to the point until confirmation the first chest rise of the high fidelity simulator (Laerdal SimMan). Additionally, two (...) in seconds Device: Time to ventilation with the Fastrach Time to ventilation (ET) based of insert the Fastrach until the chest rise of the simulator in seconds Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Time to ventilation via endotracheal tube [ Time Frame: 0 to 300 seconds ] time to ventilation will defined from when the Endotracheal tube insert into the extraglottic airway device until the first chest rise Secondary Outcome Measures : Time to ventilation via extraglottic airway device [ Time

2018 Clinical Trials

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