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Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis

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1. Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis

Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Extensor Carpi (...) Ulnaris Tendinitis Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis Aka: Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis , ECU Tendinitis From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Very common sports overuse syndrome III. Mechanism Related to racquet sports with repetitive wrist motion Squash Badminton Racquetball Rowing Tennis Tennis player with two handed backhand Excessive ulnar deviation in nondominant wrist IV. Symptoms Ulnar in racquet sport athlete V. Signs Extensor Carpi Ulnaris (ECU) location Supination: Dorsal to ulnar

2018 FP Notebook

2. Tennis Players and Water Polo Athletes Now Have Something in Common to Talk About: MRI Findings of Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Chronic Subsheath Injury (PubMed)

Tennis Players and Water Polo Athletes Now Have Something in Common to Talk About: MRI Findings of Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Chronic Subsheath Injury Pathologies of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon are often due to de Quervain's tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment among the wrist tendon pathologies. A common cause for tendinitis and tenosynovitis of the ECU tendon is its dislocation. ECU dislocation is unique among all wrist tendon injuries due to its typical location within

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2018 Cureus

3. Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis

Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Extensor Carpi (...) Ulnaris Tendinitis Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis Aka: Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Tendinitis , ECU Tendinitis From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Very common sports overuse syndrome III. Mechanism Related to racquet sports with repetitive wrist motion Squash Badminton Racquetball Rowing Tennis Tennis player with two handed backhand Excessive ulnar deviation in nondominant wrist IV. Symptoms Ulnar in racquet sport athlete V. Signs Extensor Carpi Ulnaris (ECU) location Supination: Dorsal to ulnar

2015 FP Notebook

4. Hand, Tendon Lacerations: Extensors

) and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), the extensor digitorum communis (EDC), the extensor digiti minimi (EDM [otherwise known as extensor digiti quinti (EDC)]), and the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU). The deep group comprises the abductor pollicis longus (APL), the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB), and the extensor indicis proprius (EIP). Also coursing along with the tendons in the deep compartment is the deep branch of the radial nerve, which is otherwise referred (...) IV EDM (EDC) Extensor digitorum minimi (quinti) Proximal phalanx, digit V Extends digit V Lateral epicondyle V ECU Extensor carpi ulnaris Base of metacarpal V Extends and abducts hand Lateral epicondyle and proximal ulna VI As the extensor tendons cross the wrist, they course under the extensor retinaculum. The extensor retinaculum prevents the tendons from dorsal displacement caused by natural tendency to develop a straight line from tendon origin to insertion, known as bowstringing

2014 eMedicine Surgery

5. Tendinitis and Tenosynovitis

. Tendinopathy usually results from repeated small tears or degenerative changes (sometimes with calcium deposits) that occur over years in the tendon. Tendinitis and tenosynovitis most commonly affect tendons associated with the shoulder (rotator cuff), the tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle (bicipital tendon), flexor carpi radialis or ulnaris, flexor digitorum, popliteus tendon, Achilles tendon (see ), and the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis, which share a common fibrous (...) Tendinitis and Tenosynovitis Tendinitis and Tenosynovitis - Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

6. AIUM Practice Parameter for the Performance of a Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Examination

and moving distally will allow visualization of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in its long axis. Dynamic imaging with radial deviation may be helpful in assessing the integrity of the TFCC. ? ?The transducer is then moved 90° to view the short axis of the TFCC. The ulnomeniscal homologue may be seen just deep to the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon should be viewed in supination and pronation to assess for subluxation. In the setting of inflammatory arthritis (...) , the extensor carpi ulnaris should be evaluated for tenosynovitis and rupture. 3. Dorsal—The dorsal structures are very superficial, and a high-frequency transducer and large amounts of gel are necessary to optimize the examination and prevent compression of small vessels when using color or power Doppler imaging. The extensor retinaculum divides the dorsal aspect of the wrist into 6 compartments, which accommodate 9 tendons. These tendons are examined in their short axes initially and then in their long

2017 American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

7. Imaging of Sports-related Hand and Wrist Injuries: Sports Imaging Series. (PubMed)

lesions are more challenging for radiologists and may lead to carpal instability if undiagnosed. Overuse wrist injuries are mainly represented by tendinous disorders, with De Quervain syndrome and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon disorders being the most common among them; however, there are other possible disorders such as impaction syndromes, stress fractures, and neurovascular lesions. Finally, finger lesions, including closed-tendon injuries (mallet and boutonniere injuries, jersey finger

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2016 Radiology

8. Radial Nerve Entrapment: Diagnosis and Treatment

brevis ? supinator In the forearm, via the posterior interosseous nerve: ? extensor digitorum communis ? extensor digiti minimi ? extensor carpi ulnaris ? abductor pollicis longus ? extensor pollicis brevis ? extensor pollicis longus ? extensor indicis proprius Every effort should be made to objectively confirm the diagnosis of RNE before considering surgery. A differential diagnosis for RNE includes extensor tendinitis and lateral epicondylitis (which can coexist with RNE), neuralgic amyotrophy (...) . These sites, from proximal to distal, include the fibrous bands of the radiocapitellar joint, radial recurrent vessels (the leash of Henry), the tendinous edge of the extensor carpi radialis brevis, the arcade of Frohse, and the distal edge of the supinator. Most cases of RNE have been described at the arcade of Frohse. In general, work-relatedness and appropriate symptoms and objective signs must be present for Labor and Industries to accept RNE on a claim. Electrodiagnostic studies (EDS), including

2010 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

9. Radial Nerve Entrapment (Overview)

capsule. In four cases, Clavert et al noted dense fibrous tissue surrounding the radial nerve supply to the extensor carpi radialis brevis. [ ] Neither fibrous structures nor adhesions of the deep branch of the radial nerve were observed along its course through the supinator. The fibrous arch of the supinator arose in a semicircular manner and was tendinous in 87% of extremities and membranous in 13%. The average length of the Frohse arcade was 25.9 mm, and the angle formed by the radial shaft (...) include the fibrous bands attached to the radiocapitellar joint, radial recurrent vessels, the tendinous origin of the extensor carpi radialis brevis, the tendinous origin of the supinator (ie, arcade of Frohse), and fibrous thickenings within and at the distal margin of the supinator. [ , , ] Posterior interosseous nerve syndrome The etiology of posterior interosseous nerve syndrome is similar to that of radial tunnel syndrome. Compression is thought to occur after takeoff of the branches

2014 eMedicine Surgery

10. Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain (Overview)

dorsal compartment containing the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) is a subsheath that is separate from the extensor retinaculum. From the dorsal base of the ulnar styloid, fibers from the subsheath blend and strengthen the dorsal aspect of the triangular cartilage and ligaments. These fibers extend to the fifth metacarpal distally. The actual extensor retinaculum courses over the subsheath; continues volarly without attachment to the ulna; and inserts onto the pisiform, triquetrum, fifth metacarpal (...) ulnar zones. Dorsal ulnar zone The dorsal ulnar zone consists of the following: Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ)/triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) Extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) Lunate Triquetrum Lunotriquetral joint Hamate Fourth and fifth carpometacarpal (CMC) joints Physical examination of the DRUJ should begin with examination of the contralateral wrist to note any ulnar variance or inherent joint instability of the individual. Evaluation of the DRUJ begins with palpation over the distal

2014 eMedicine Surgery

11. Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain (Diagnosis)

dorsal compartment containing the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) is a subsheath that is separate from the extensor retinaculum. From the dorsal base of the ulnar styloid, fibers from the subsheath blend and strengthen the dorsal aspect of the triangular cartilage and ligaments. These fibers extend to the fifth metacarpal distally. The actual extensor retinaculum courses over the subsheath; continues volarly without attachment to the ulna; and inserts onto the pisiform, triquetrum, fifth metacarpal (...) ulnar zones. Dorsal ulnar zone The dorsal ulnar zone consists of the following: Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ)/triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) Extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) Lunate Triquetrum Lunotriquetral joint Hamate Fourth and fifth carpometacarpal (CMC) joints Physical examination of the DRUJ should begin with examination of the contralateral wrist to note any ulnar variance or inherent joint instability of the individual. Evaluation of the DRUJ begins with palpation over the distal

2014 eMedicine Surgery

12. Radial Nerve Entrapment (Diagnosis)

capsule. In four cases, Clavert et al noted dense fibrous tissue surrounding the radial nerve supply to the extensor carpi radialis brevis. [ ] Neither fibrous structures nor adhesions of the deep branch of the radial nerve were observed along its course through the supinator. The fibrous arch of the supinator arose in a semicircular manner and was tendinous in 87% of extremities and membranous in 13%. The average length of the Frohse arcade was 25.9 mm, and the angle formed by the radial shaft (...) include the fibrous bands attached to the radiocapitellar joint, radial recurrent vessels, the tendinous origin of the extensor carpi radialis brevis, the tendinous origin of the supinator (ie, arcade of Frohse), and fibrous thickenings within and at the distal margin of the supinator. [ , , ] Posterior interosseous nerve syndrome The etiology of posterior interosseous nerve syndrome is similar to that of radial tunnel syndrome. Compression is thought to occur after takeoff of the branches

2014 eMedicine Surgery

13. Lateral Epicondylitis (Overview)

research should evaluate the risk associated with the duration and repetition of occupational exposure on the incidence of lateral epicondylitis. [ ] Previous Next: Functional Anatomy The area of maximal tenderness is usually an area just distal to the origin of the extensor muscles of the forearm at the lateral epicondyle. Most typically, the ECRB is involved, but others may include the extensor digitorum and extensor carpi ulnaris. The radial nerve splits into the superficial radial and posterior (...) of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendon 1-2 cm distal to its attachment on the lateral epicondyle. [ , ] For patient education resources, see the , as well as . Next: Epidemiology Frequency United States The annual incidence is 1-3% of the U.S. population. Men and women are equally affected. Typically, lateral epicondylitis affects individuals greater than age 40 years. There is usually a history of repetitive activity aggravating the extensor tendons of the forearm. Repetitive, eccentric motion

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Lateral Epicondylitis (Overview)

of inflammation, or enthesitis, at the muscular origin of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB). This inflammation leads to microtears of the tendon, with subsequent fibrosis and, ultimately, tissue failure. Less commonly, the attachments of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), extensor digitorum communis (EDC), or extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) are involved. [ , , ] Previous Next: Epidemiology Frequency Lateral epicondylitis is seen in up to 50% of tennis players. [ ] Sex The condition affects men (...) every year in the United States. [ ] Lateral epicondylitis is usually precipitated by repetitive contraction of the wrist extensors and is characterized by aching that is worsened with activity. It is most commonly attributed to pathology of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon. [ ] Early conservative management is the key to symptom resolution, which eventually allows return to vocational and avocational activities without restriction. Patients with symptoms that persist beyond 6 months may

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Hand, Nerve Compression Syndromes: Upper Extremity

of the interosseous membrane to ultimately provide sensation to the posterior aspect of the wrist. This nerve innervates the extensor indicis proprius, extensor digiti quinti, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis, and extensor digitorum communis muscles. Previous Next: Pathophysiology The phrase compressive neuropathy implies that the peripheral nerves are being impinged upon by adjacent anatomic structures. The resultant injury is assumed to be related to reduced epineural (...) between the brachialis and the triceps muscles. The fascial bands over the median nerve constitute the Struthers arcade. The nerve passes within the cubital tunnel posterior to the medial epicondyle. It is directly underneath a tight fascial roof known as the Osborne band, which is contiguous with the leading fascial heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle. Just above the elbow branches, the nerve branches to the superficial head of the FCU. The nerve lies directly over the top of the FDS

2014 eMedicine Surgery

16. Lateral Epicondylitis (Diagnosis)

of inflammation, or enthesitis, at the muscular origin of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB). This inflammation leads to microtears of the tendon, with subsequent fibrosis and, ultimately, tissue failure. Less commonly, the attachments of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), extensor digitorum communis (EDC), or extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) are involved. [ , , ] Previous Next: Epidemiology Frequency Lateral epicondylitis is seen in up to 50% of tennis players. [ ] Sex The condition affects men (...) every year in the United States. [ ] Lateral epicondylitis is usually precipitated by repetitive contraction of the wrist extensors and is characterized by aching that is worsened with activity. It is most commonly attributed to pathology of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon. [ ] Early conservative management is the key to symptom resolution, which eventually allows return to vocational and avocational activities without restriction. Patients with symptoms that persist beyond 6 months may

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Lateral Epicondylitis (Diagnosis)

research should evaluate the risk associated with the duration and repetition of occupational exposure on the incidence of lateral epicondylitis. [ ] Previous Next: Functional Anatomy The area of maximal tenderness is usually an area just distal to the origin of the extensor muscles of the forearm at the lateral epicondyle. Most typically, the ECRB is involved, but others may include the extensor digitorum and extensor carpi ulnaris. The radial nerve splits into the superficial radial and posterior (...) of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendon 1-2 cm distal to its attachment on the lateral epicondyle. [ , ] For patient education resources, see the , as well as . Next: Epidemiology Frequency United States The annual incidence is 1-3% of the U.S. population. Men and women are equally affected. Typically, lateral epicondylitis affects individuals greater than age 40 years. There is usually a history of repetitive activity aggravating the extensor tendons of the forearm. Repetitive, eccentric motion

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Hand, Tendon Transfers

Pronator teres Brachioradialis Flexor digitorum superficialis Thumb extension Brachioradialis Extensor indicis proprius Palmaris longus Finger flexion Brachioradialis Extensor carpi radialis longus Adjacent profundus Finger extension Brachioradialis Flexor carpi ulnaris Flexor carpi radialis Adjacent finger extensor Extensor indicis proprius Wrist extension Brachioradialis Pronator teres Wrist flexion - Rarely reconstructed Elbow extension Posterior deltoid Biceps Elbow flexion Pectoralis major Triceps (...) Latissimus Forearm flexor mass (Steindler) The following are donor muscles and common recipients: Brachioradialis Extensor carpi radialis brevis Flexor digitorum profundus Flexor pollicis longus [ ] Extensor digitorum communis Extensor pollicis longus Extensor carpi radialis longus - Flexor digitorum profundus Pronator teres Extensor carpi radialis brevis Extensor pollicis longus Flexor carpi ulnaris - Extensor digitorum communis Flexor carpi radialis Extensor digitorum communis Extensor pollicis longus

2014 eMedicine Surgery

19. Hand, Fracture and Dislocations: Metacarpal

at the base of the metacarpals very typically associate adjacent injury. Fracture-dislocation of the base of the fifth metacarpal is a common intra-articular injury; dorsal and proximal fragment displacement is due to extrinsic extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tone and is the corollary to the Bennett fracture of the thumb. [ ] Thus, this injury has been termed the reverse Bennett fracture. The fourth and fifth metacarpals are the most mobile about the CMC interface, their bases (...) to the metacarpal base include fractures, dislocations, or a combination of these (fracture-dislocations). The CMC joints, with the exception of the thumb, are generally stable joints, with the metacarpal bases held in position by dorsal and volar CMC ligaments. The individual metacarpal bases are also strongly bound together by interosseous ligaments. The most common injuries seen in this region of the metacarpal are impaction fractures caused by excessive axial loading, avulsion fractures from tendinous

2014 eMedicine Surgery

20. Hand, Fractures and Dislocations: Wrist

coronal fractures Hook fractures have several causes. Fractures can result from a direct blow or from repetitive contusions with a handle (golf, baseball) or racket (tennis, squash). Indirect avulsions through forceful pull of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and avulsion through the pisiform hamate ligament can cause hook fractures, as can a crush injury. Because of the tenuous vascular supply, nonunions of the hook of the hamate are common. Body fractures can result from severe wrist fracture (...) to median nerve compression. Pisiform dislocation occurs with injury directly to the ulnar carpus or hyperextension traction of the flexor carpi ulnaris that tears the pisohamate or pisometacarpal ligaments. Trapezoidal dislocations may occur from a dorsal blow to the second metacarpal during wrist flexion. Because of the pyramidal shape of the trapezoid and the weak dorsal ligaments, the trapezoid is usually dislocated in a dorsal direction. Trapezium dislocations occur in dorsal and palmar directions

2014 eMedicine Surgery

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