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243 results for

Excess Anion Gap

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241. Alteration of anion gap and strong ion difference caused by hydroxyethyl starch 6% (130/0.42) and gelatin 4% in children. (Abstract)

chloride concentration (P < 0.01) and an accompanying decrease in SID (P < 0.01). In the HES group, the anion gap decreased significantly (P < 0.01) whereas the anion gap remained stable in the GEL group. In both groups, initial actual base excess and pH did not change significantly after colloid administration.Moderate intraoperative plasma replacement with unbalanced synthetic colloids HES and GEL leads to a decrease in SID and, in the case of HES, to a significant decrease in the anion gap (...) Alteration of anion gap and strong ion difference caused by hydroxyethyl starch 6% (130/0.42) and gelatin 4% in children. Synthetic colloid administration is a common practice for preventing perioperative hypovolemia and consecutive circulatory failure in children. This prospective, randomized study was conducted to investigate the effects of two different unbalanced synthetic colloid solutions on acid-base equilibrium in children.Fifty pediatric patients (aged 0-12 years) scheduled for major

2008 Paediatric anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

242. Recurrent high anion gap metabolic acidosis secondary to 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid). (Abstract)

acidosis in adults in association with acetaminophen use. Acetaminophen may, in susceptible individuals, disrupt regulation of the gamma-glutamyl cycle and result in excessive 5-oxoproline production. Suspicion for 5-oxoproline-associated high anion gap metabolic acidosis should be entertained when the cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis remains poorly defined, the anion gap cannot be explained reasonably by measured organic acids, and there is concomitant acetaminophen use. (...) Recurrent high anion gap metabolic acidosis secondary to 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid). High anion gap metabolic acidosis in adults is a severe metabolic disorder for which the primary organic acid usually is apparent by clinical history and standard laboratory testing. We report a case of recurrent high anion gap metabolic acidosis in a 48-year-old man who initially presented with anorexia and malaise. Physical examination was unrevealing. Arterial pH was 6.98, P co 2 was 5 mm Hg

2005 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

243. Initial pH, base deficit, lactate, anion gap, strong ion difference, and strong ion gap predict outcome from major vascular injury. (Abstract)

standard base excess (-17.9 +/- 5.1 vs. -2.9 +/- 4.4 mEq/L, p < .001), lactate (11.1 +/- 3.6 vs. 3.6 +/- 1.5 mmol/L, p < .001), anion gap (28.2 +/- 4.1 vs. 15.6 +/- 3.1, p < .001), and strong ion gap (10.8 +/- 3.2 vs. 2.4 +/- 1.8, p < .001) were higher. All but one nonsurvivor had initial emergency department pH < or = 7.26, standard base excess < or = -7.3 mEq/L, lactate > or = 5 mmol/L, and strong ion gap > or = 5 mEq/L. All of the acid-base descriptors were strongly associated with outcome (...) Initial pH, base deficit, lactate, anion gap, strong ion difference, and strong ion gap predict outcome from major vascular injury. This study determines whether acid-base data obtained in the emergency department correlate with outcome from major vascular injury.Observational, retrospective record review of trauma patients requiring vascular repair (torso or extremity, January 1988 to December 1997). Data included age, Injury Severity Score, injury mechanism, survival, laboratory profiling

2004 Critical Care Medicine

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