How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

189 results for

Eosinophilic Cellulitis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

181. Anti-Interleukin-5 (IL-5) Study for Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

, cardiac, and hepatic function Not pregnant or breastfeeding A diagnosis of hypereosinophilic syndrome such as: Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome; Eosinophilia myalgia syndrome; Eosinophilic gastroenteritis; Churg-Strauss syndrome; Eosinophilic cellulitis; Benign hypereosinophilia; or Eosinophilic esophagitis. Maintained on, or in need of, the following: glucocorticoids, interferon, methotrexate, hydroxyurea, cytoxan, 6-mercaptopurine, or vincristine Blood eosinophil counts greater than 750 cells (...) Medical Center, Cincinnati Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Toxicity of anti-IL-5 Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Hypereosinophilic Syndromes Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Churg-Strauss Syndrome Eosinophilic Esophagitis Drug: Mepolizumab Phase 1 Phase 2 Detailed Description: The purpose of the study is to assess the toxicity of anti-IL-5, and to see whether it lowers peripheral blood eosinophils and/or tissue and whether it has a steroid and/or interferon sparing

2005 Clinical Trials

182. Unexplained hypereosinophilia and the need for cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses. (PubMed)

patient also had recurrent lesions of eosinophilic cellulitis. All 3 patients were initially diagnosed as having idiopathic HES, but after evaluation and demonstration of molecular abnormalities, they were classified as having eosinophilic leukemia.Patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic HES should be evaluated for cytogenetic or molecular genetic abnormalities. These abnormalities can establish a diagnosis of chronic eosinophilic leukemia and may provide clues for emerging therapies. (...) Unexplained hypereosinophilia and the need for cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses. Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a diagnosis made after the exclusion of other causes of eosinophilia. However, differentiation of idiopathic HES from eosinophilic leukemia is sometimes difficult. In some cases, these diagnoses can be differentiated by cytogenetic or molecular findings, as illustrated in the patients described herein.We describe 3 patients with HES and associated pruritus; 1

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2004 Archives of Dermatology

183. Wells' syndrome: a clinical and histopathologic review of seven cases. (PubMed)

Wells' syndrome: a clinical and histopathologic review of seven cases. Wells' syndrome, or eosinophilic cellulitis, is characterized clinically by an acute dermatitis resembling cellulitis, which evolves into violaceous plaques that resolve spontaneously without scarring. The histopathologic features are dynamic, starting with dermal edema and infiltration of eosinophils, the development of "flame figures," and finishing with the appearance of phagocytic histiocytes. We present the clinical (...) and histopathologic features of seven cases of eosinophilic cellulitis.

2003 International Journal of Dermatology

184. Exaggerated insect bite reaction exacerbated by a pyogenic infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. (PubMed)

rapidly with ibuprofen, leaving cellulitis around a small ulcer infected with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The cellulitis responded to oral flucloxacillin. Subsequent multiple small exaggerated insect bite reaction lesions settled with oral prednisolone. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) was considered unlikely based on the lack of a morphoea-like resolution phase, histological lack of flame figures and presence of vasculitis; however, the distinction is probably (...) Exaggerated insect bite reaction exacerbated by a pyogenic infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. A 69-year-old woman with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presented with an 18-month history of pruritic, tender, erythematous plaques. The recurrent lesions simulated insect bites and cellulitis, but failed to respond to appropriate treatments. A recent severe flare was associated with markedly elevated inflammatory markers and swelling of the left leg. The swelling settled

2007 Australasian Journal of Dermatology

185. Narrative review: diseases that masquerade as infectious cellulitis. (PubMed)

Narrative review: diseases that masquerade as infectious cellulitis. For cellulitis that does not respond to conventional antimicrobial treatment, clinicians should consider, among other explanations, several noninfectious disorders that might masquerade as infectious cellulitis. Diseases that commonly masquerade as this condition include thrombophlebitis, contact dermatitis, insect stings, drug reactions, eosinophilic cellulitis (the Wells syndrome), gouty arthritis, carcinoma erysipelatoides (...) , familial Mediterranean fever, and foreign-body reactions. Diseases that uncommonly masquerade as infectious cellulitis include urticaria, lymphedema, lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, lymphoma, leukemia, Paget disease, and panniculitis. Clinicians should do an initial diagnostic work-up directed by the findings from a detailed history and complete physical examination. In many cases, skin biopsy is the only tool that helps identify the correct diagnosis. Special tests may also be needed.

2005 Annals of Internal Medicine

186. Eosinophilic cellulitislike reaction to subcutaneous etanercept injection. (PubMed)

etanercept. The patient had a similar reaction to adalimumab injection 2 weeks prior to presentation. While benzyl alcohol is present in the etanercept preparation, and mannitol in both drugs, dermal injection revealed no reaction to these additives. Biopsy specimens from the etanercept injection site demonstrated papillary dermal edema accompanied by a brisk polymorphous infiltrate with a predominance of eosinophils and scattered flame figures.Histologic features of eosinophilic cellulitis as a response (...) Eosinophilic cellulitislike reaction to subcutaneous etanercept injection. Injection site reactions are well recognized in patients treated with etanercept. Previous reports describe histologic findings of a cell-mediated T(H)1 reaction, with CD8+ T cells composing the majority of the dermal infiltrate.A pruritic, erythematous, edematous patch occurred on the right thigh of a 57-year-old white woman treated for rheumatoid arthritis within 12 to 24 hours after her second dose of subcutaneous

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2006 Archives of Dermatology

187. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). (PubMed)

Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) is a recurrent inflammatory dermatosis characterized by massive infiltration of eosinophils into the skin. Drugs and pathogens have been recognized causes of eosinophilic cellulitis. We report the repeated association of eosinophilic cellulitis with herpes simplex virus type 2 infections. Antiviral therapy led to a complete remission of eosinophilic cellulitis, indicating (...) that causative treatment of underlying diseases can be effective in controlling eosinophilic cellulitis.

2003 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

188. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) as a cutaneous reaction to the administration of adalimumab (PubMed)

Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) as a cutaneous reaction to the administration of adalimumab 16699060 2006 06 12 2018 11 13 0003-4967 65 6 2006 Jun Annals of the rheumatic diseases Ann. Rheum. Dis. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) as a cutaneous reaction to the administration of adalimumab. 839-40 Boura P P Sarantopoulos A A Lefaki I I Skendros P P Papadopoulos P P eng Case Reports Letter Review England Ann Rheum Dis 0372355 0003-4967 0 Antibodies, Monoclonal 0 Antibodies (...) , Monoclonal, Humanized 0 Antirheumatic Agents 0 Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha FYS6T7F842 Adalimumab IM Adalimumab Aged Antibodies, Monoclonal adverse effects Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized Antirheumatic Agents adverse effects Arthritis, Rheumatoid complications drug therapy Cellulitis chemically induced Eosinophilia chemically induced Female Humans Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha antagonists & inhibitors 5 2006 5 16 9 0 2006 6 13 9 0 2006 5 16 9 0 ppublish 16699060 65/6/839 10.1136/ard.2005.044685 PMC1798161

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2006 Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

189. Eosinophilic cellulitis as a manifestation of onchocerciasis. (PubMed)

Eosinophilic cellulitis as a manifestation of onchocerciasis. 4093946 1986 04 09 2018 11 13 0141-0768 78 Suppl 11 1985 Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine J R Soc Med Eosinophilic cellulitis as a manifestation of onchocerciasis. 21-2 Prendiville J S JS Jones R R RR Bryceson A A eng Case Reports Journal Article England J R Soc Med 7802879 0141-0768 V867Q8X3ZD Diethylcarbamazine IM Cellulitis etiology pathology Diethylcarbamazine Eosinophilia etiology Humans Male Middle Aged Onchocerciasis

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1985 Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>