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Eosinophilic Cellulitis

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181. Cholesterol Emboli

causes of acute abdomen. or . De novo . Multisystem organ failure due to other causes, eg sepsis, cardiogenic shock. De novo myocardial infarction (MI). Other causes of renal impairment, eg , glomerulonephritis, renal vascular disease. Severe atheroma of aorto-iliac vessels. Cardiogenic shock. Secondary hypertension. Other causes of . Vasculitides, eg . Cellulitis. Deep vein thrombosis. Causes of acute neurological dysfunction or delirium. Diabetic vascular disease and leg ulcers. . Investigations (...) FBC reveals leukocytosis in some cases but is nonspecific. Eosinophilia (found in early days in 80% patients). [ ] U&Es nearly always show varying degrees of elevated urea and creatinine. Creatine kinase, cardiac enzymes, LFTs and amylase may be elevated. Urine microscopy shows hyaline casts and eosinophils (strongly suggestive of the diagnosis). Urinalysis may show microscopic haematuria and proteinuria. Elevated CRP before arterial instrumentation is a useful predictive factor with an odds ratio

2008 Mentor

182. Aspergillosis

Segmental or lobar collapse Progressive respiratory failure Differential diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis The differentials of the various clinical syndromes are wide, depending on the presenting symptoms, radiological findings and clinical course. Conditions to consider include: . . . Eosinophilic pneumonia. . . Other opportunistic infections in the immunocompromised. . . Cutaneous aspergillosis This occurs most commonly as a result of disseminated (or invasive) infection with Aspergillus spp (...) . [ ] Primary cutaneous aspergillosis : this is less common. Infection tends to occur on the background of previous trauma, including wound infections at cannula and catheter sites and after venepuncture. A. flavus or Aspergillus terreus are the most frequent causes of primary infection. Localised cellulitis is usually followed by development of a necrotic ulcer. Onychomycosis due to infection with Aspergillus spp. can also occur. [ ] Primary skin infection can lead to invasive aspergillosis, particularly

2008 Mentor

183. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

, UK and European Guidelines. You may find one of our more useful. In this article In This Article Chronic Granulomatous Disease In this article Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi [ ] . Epidemiology CGD is rare (prevalence approximately 1 in 250,000) [ ] . CGD is caused by pathogenic variants in one of five genes that encode the subunits (...) . Infections typically include pneumonia, lymphadenitis, liver abscess, osteomyelitis and skin abscesses or cellulitis. Granulomas typically involve the bladder and gastrointestinal tract (often initially the pylorus and later the oesophagus, jejunum, ileum, caecum, rectum and perirectal area). Initial features often involve the skin - eg, recurrent pyodermas causing perianal, axillary or scalp abscesses. Other features include fever, diarrhoea, osteomyelitis, pulmonary abscesses and granulomas, spleen

2008 Mentor

184. Wells' syndrome: a clinical and histopathologic review of seven cases. (Abstract)

Wells' syndrome: a clinical and histopathologic review of seven cases. Wells' syndrome, or eosinophilic cellulitis, is characterized clinically by an acute dermatitis resembling cellulitis, which evolves into violaceous plaques that resolve spontaneously without scarring. The histopathologic features are dynamic, starting with dermal edema and infiltration of eosinophils, the development of "flame figures," and finishing with the appearance of phagocytic histiocytes. We present the clinical (...) and histopathologic features of seven cases of eosinophilic cellulitis.

2003 International Journal of Dermatology

185. Narrative review: diseases that masquerade as infectious cellulitis. (Abstract)

Narrative review: diseases that masquerade as infectious cellulitis. For cellulitis that does not respond to conventional antimicrobial treatment, clinicians should consider, among other explanations, several noninfectious disorders that might masquerade as infectious cellulitis. Diseases that commonly masquerade as this condition include thrombophlebitis, contact dermatitis, insect stings, drug reactions, eosinophilic cellulitis (the Wells syndrome), gouty arthritis, carcinoma erysipelatoides (...) , familial Mediterranean fever, and foreign-body reactions. Diseases that uncommonly masquerade as infectious cellulitis include urticaria, lymphedema, lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, lymphoma, leukemia, Paget disease, and panniculitis. Clinicians should do an initial diagnostic work-up directed by the findings from a detailed history and complete physical examination. In many cases, skin biopsy is the only tool that helps identify the correct diagnosis. Special tests may also be needed.

2005 Annals of Internal Medicine

186. Eosinophilic cellulitislike reaction to subcutaneous etanercept injection. Full Text available with Trip Pro

etanercept. The patient had a similar reaction to adalimumab injection 2 weeks prior to presentation. While benzyl alcohol is present in the etanercept preparation, and mannitol in both drugs, dermal injection revealed no reaction to these additives. Biopsy specimens from the etanercept injection site demonstrated papillary dermal edema accompanied by a brisk polymorphous infiltrate with a predominance of eosinophils and scattered flame figures.Histologic features of eosinophilic cellulitis as a response (...) Eosinophilic cellulitislike reaction to subcutaneous etanercept injection. Injection site reactions are well recognized in patients treated with etanercept. Previous reports describe histologic findings of a cell-mediated T(H)1 reaction, with CD8+ T cells composing the majority of the dermal infiltrate.A pruritic, erythematous, edematous patch occurred on the right thigh of a 57-year-old white woman treated for rheumatoid arthritis within 12 to 24 hours after her second dose of subcutaneous

2006 Archives of Dermatology

187. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) as a cutaneous reaction to the administration of adalimumab Full Text available with Trip Pro

Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) as a cutaneous reaction to the administration of adalimumab 16699060 2006 06 12 2018 11 13 0003-4967 65 6 2006 Jun Annals of the rheumatic diseases Ann. Rheum. Dis. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) as a cutaneous reaction to the administration of adalimumab. 839-40 Boura P P Sarantopoulos A A Lefaki I I Skendros P P Papadopoulos P P eng Case Reports Letter Review England Ann Rheum Dis 0372355 0003-4967 0 Antibodies, Monoclonal 0 Antibodies (...) , Monoclonal, Humanized 0 Antirheumatic Agents 0 Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha FYS6T7F842 Adalimumab IM Adalimumab Aged Antibodies, Monoclonal adverse effects Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized Antirheumatic Agents adverse effects Arthritis, Rheumatoid complications drug therapy Cellulitis chemically induced Eosinophilia chemically induced Female Humans Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha antagonists & inhibitors 5 2006 5 16 9 0 2006 6 13 9 0 2006 5 16 9 0 ppublish 16699060 65/6/839 10.1136/ard.2005.044685 PMC1798161

2006 Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

188. Eosinophilic cellulitis (wells' syndrome) in association with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Eosinophilic cellulitis (wells' syndrome) in association with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) is an uncommon inflammatory disease with clinical polymorphism. It is often associated with infectious, allergic or myeloproliferative diseases; however, the exact aetiology is unknown. This report describes a rare case of eosinophilic cellulitis in association with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. The typical skin findings of Wells' syndrome disappeared

2007 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

189. Eosinophilic cellulitis as a manifestation of onchocerciasis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Eosinophilic cellulitis as a manifestation of onchocerciasis. 4093946 1986 04 09 2018 11 13 0141-0768 78 Suppl 11 1985 Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine J R Soc Med Eosinophilic cellulitis as a manifestation of onchocerciasis. 21-2 Prendiville J S JS Jones R R RR Bryceson A A eng Case Reports Journal Article England J R Soc Med 7802879 0141-0768 V867Q8X3ZD Diethylcarbamazine IM Cellulitis etiology pathology Diethylcarbamazine Eosinophilia etiology Humans Male Middle Aged Onchocerciasis

1985 Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

190. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). (Abstract)

Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) is a recurrent inflammatory dermatosis characterized by massive infiltration of eosinophils into the skin. Drugs and pathogens have been recognized causes of eosinophilic cellulitis. We report the repeated association of eosinophilic cellulitis with herpes simplex virus type 2 infections. Antiviral therapy led to a complete remission of eosinophilic cellulitis, indicating (...) that causative treatment of underlying diseases can be effective in controlling eosinophilic cellulitis.

2003 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

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