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21. Complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathetic dystrophy medical treatment guideline.

arise as a reaction to organic pain and in some cases may cause pain. Electronic instrumentation is used to monitor the targeted physiology and then displayed or fed back to the patient visually, auditorily, or tactilely, with coaching by a biofeedback specialist. Refer to the Division's for indications, evidence, and time frames. Complementary Medicine Complementary medicine, termed complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in some systems, is a term used to describe a broad range of treatment (...) neuropathic pain, including evidence and time frames for alpha-acting agents, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, cannabinoid products, hypnotics and sedatives, NSAIDs, post-operative pain management, skeletal muscle relaxants, smoking cessation medications and treatment, topical drug delivery, and other agents. Opiods Evidence Statements Regarding Effectiveness and Side Effects of Opioids Strong Evidence In the setting of chronic nonspecific low back pain, the short and intermediate term reduction in pain

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

22. i STAT CG4+ and CHEM8+ cartridges for point-of-care testing in the emergency department

decision improve. Age is a protected characteristic under the 2010 Equality Act. i STAT CG4+ and CHEM8+ cartridges for point-of-care testing in the emergency department (MIB38) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 12 of 41Evidence re Evidence review view Clinical and technical evidence Regulatory bodies Regulatory bodies A search of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency website revealed (...) : 1120–4 The College of Emergency Medicine (2014) Crowding in emergency departments. Date for review: 24 June 2015 The College of Emergency Medicine (2011) Emergency department clinical quality indicators – A CEM guide to implementation. [online; accessed 5 June 2015] Thomas FO, Hoffman TL, Handrahan DL et al. (2009) The measure of treatment agreement between portable and laboratory blood gas measurements in guiding protocol-driven ventilator management. Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 67

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

23. The “go to the ER” mentality of American medicine

doctors or secretaries. People who need to be admitted are sent in “just to get checked before they go upstairs.” Or sometimes, so the physician on duty can do the negotiation with the hospitalist, rather than having the primary care physician do so. Why is the ED the default? In 1986 Reagan championed and Congress passed EMTALA, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, which says you can’t turn anyone away for reasons of non-payment. Another well-intentioned bit of government meddling (...) with more and more complex and multi-varied duties in the emergency departments of the 21st century. I’m not a medical economist. I do have some thoughts on the well-intentioned but deeply flawed Affordable Care Act. However, I won’t go there right now. What I do want to address is the “go directly to the ER” mentality of modern American medicine. Call your physician. If it’s after hours, the recording for any physician or practice of any sort in America will have a message: “If this is an emergency

2016 KevinMD blog

24. Does Mednav, a Medical Navigation System, Aid Non-technical and Technical Skills in the Simulated Obstetric Emergency?

been developed called 'Mednav'. Mednav is a navigation device for the management of medical emergencies; developed at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital since 2010. This is a device which acts similar to a satellite navigation devices in the automobile industry navigating you from A to B, MedNav navigates the clinician from the unwell patient to the well patient. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Postpartum Hemorrhage, Device: MedNav Not Applicable Detailed Description: Potential (...) Posted : May 26, 2016 Last Update Posted : May 26, 2016 Sponsor: Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust Information provided by (Responsible Party): Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: It is well known that medical errors account for a large amount of patient harm within the hospital setting. This is a significant problem within the emergency context. A system that acts as a prompt, guide and scribe for the obstetric emergency has

2016 Clinical Trials

25. Management of the Third Stage of Labor (Diagnosis)

uterotonic agents. [ ] Carbetocin is not available in the United States. has shown early promise in the treatment of PPH. Additionally, its low cost, pill form, and heat stability make it a potentially excellent agent for prophylaxis in the third stage of labor. Unfortunately, randomized trials have shown it to be inferior to injectable uterotonics and to not be significantly more effective than placebo. [ ] Adverse effects, such as shivering and fever, are common; in regimens using higher doses, nausea (...) of Obstetrical Emergencies . 3rd ed. Bristol, UK: Clinical Press; 1999. 196-201. Sleep J. Physiology and management of the third stage of labour. Bennett VR, Brown LK, eds. Myles' Textbook for Midwives . 12th ed. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone; 1993. 216-29. Dupont C, Ducloy-Bouthors AS, Huissoud C. [Clinical and pharmacological procedures for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in the third stage of labor.]. J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris) . 2014 Nov 6. 43(10):966-997. . Prendiville WJ

2014 eMedicine.com

26. Preterm Labor (Overview)

with prematurity. [ ] Goals of management The focus of this article is the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of preterm labor with intact membranes. The management of preterm labor associated with ruptured membranes is reviewed in ; however, the overall goals of both management schemes are similar. Goals of obstetric patient management of preterm labor should include (1) early identification of risk factors associated with preterm birth, (2) timely diagnosis of preterm labor, (3) identifying the etiology (...) wet smear, positive whiff test, and a vaginal pH >4.50) Patients should be treated per the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, with test-of-cure sampling and subsequent treatment if necessary. Preterm labor/birth history A history of prior preterm deliveries places the patient in the high-risk category. Of the predictors of preterm birth, past obstetric history may be one of the strongest predictors of recurrent preterm birth. Given a baseline risk of 10-12%, the risk

2014 eMedicine.com

27. Management of the Third Stage of Labor (Overview)

uterotonic agents. [ ] Carbetocin is not available in the United States. has shown early promise in the treatment of PPH. Additionally, its low cost, pill form, and heat stability make it a potentially excellent agent for prophylaxis in the third stage of labor. Unfortunately, randomized trials have shown it to be inferior to injectable uterotonics and to not be significantly more effective than placebo. [ ] Adverse effects, such as shivering and fever, are common; in regimens using higher doses, nausea (...) of Obstetrical Emergencies . 3rd ed. Bristol, UK: Clinical Press; 1999. 196-201. Sleep J. Physiology and management of the third stage of labour. Bennett VR, Brown LK, eds. Myles' Textbook for Midwives . 12th ed. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone; 1993. 216-29. Dupont C, Ducloy-Bouthors AS, Huissoud C. [Clinical and pharmacological procedures for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in the third stage of labor.]. J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris) . 2014 Nov 6. 43(10):966-997. . Prendiville WJ

2014 eMedicine.com

28. Management of the Third Stage of Labor (Follow-up)

uterotonic agents. [ ] Carbetocin is not available in the United States. has shown early promise in the treatment of PPH. Additionally, its low cost, pill form, and heat stability make it a potentially excellent agent for prophylaxis in the third stage of labor. Unfortunately, randomized trials have shown it to be inferior to injectable uterotonics and to not be significantly more effective than placebo. [ ] Adverse effects, such as shivering and fever, are common; in regimens using higher doses, nausea (...) of Obstetrical Emergencies . 3rd ed. Bristol, UK: Clinical Press; 1999. 196-201. Sleep J. Physiology and management of the third stage of labour. Bennett VR, Brown LK, eds. Myles' Textbook for Midwives . 12th ed. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone; 1993. 216-29. Dupont C, Ducloy-Bouthors AS, Huissoud C. [Clinical and pharmacological procedures for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in the third stage of labor.]. J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris) . 2014 Nov 6. 43(10):966-997. . Prendiville WJ

2014 eMedicine.com

29. Preterm Labor (Follow-up)

with prematurity. [ ] Goals of management The focus of this article is the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of preterm labor with intact membranes. The management of preterm labor associated with ruptured membranes is reviewed in ; however, the overall goals of both management schemes are similar. Goals of obstetric patient management of preterm labor should include (1) early identification of risk factors associated with preterm birth, (2) timely diagnosis of preterm labor, (3) identifying the etiology (...) wet smear, positive whiff test, and a vaginal pH >4.50) Patients should be treated per the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, with test-of-cure sampling and subsequent treatment if necessary. Preterm labor/birth history A history of prior preterm deliveries places the patient in the high-risk category. Of the predictors of preterm birth, past obstetric history may be one of the strongest predictors of recurrent preterm birth. Given a baseline risk of 10-12%, the risk

2014 eMedicine.com

30. Labor and Delivery, Normal Delivery of the Newborn

prolapse is detected on pelvic examination, the clinician should leave the hand in place, applying pressure against the presenting fetal part to keep it as far out of the pelvis as possible to prevent cord compression. The incidence of cord prolapse is directly proportional to cord length. The treatment is immediate conversion to cesarean delivery. If not treated emergently, cord prolapse is associated with high perinatal mortality. Brow presentation This may convert to face or vertex presentation (...) . If this presentation is detected prior to active labor, external rotation through ECV may be attempted. When this presentation is detected during labor, maternal risk for infection, uterine rupture, or both is high. Emergent abdominal delivery is indicated. Twin pregnancy If a nonvertex second twin presentation occurs, it is managed according to , maternal preference, and practitioner comfort. The exceptions to vaginal delivery include the following: Presenting twin in breech position Conjoined twin anatomy Most

2014 eMedicine.com

31. Preterm Labor (Diagnosis)

with prematurity. [ ] Goals of management The focus of this article is the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of preterm labor with intact membranes. The management of preterm labor associated with ruptured membranes is reviewed in ; however, the overall goals of both management schemes are similar. Goals of obstetric patient management of preterm labor should include (1) early identification of risk factors associated with preterm birth, (2) timely diagnosis of preterm labor, (3) identifying the etiology (...) wet smear, positive whiff test, and a vaginal pH >4.50) Patients should be treated per the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, with test-of-cure sampling and subsequent treatment if necessary. Preterm labor/birth history A history of prior preterm deliveries places the patient in the high-risk category. Of the predictors of preterm birth, past obstetric history may be one of the strongest predictors of recurrent preterm birth. Given a baseline risk of 10-12%, the risk

2014 eMedicine.com

32. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®) - PDQ Cancer Information Summaries - NCBI Bookshelf Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US); 2002-. PDQ Cancer Information (...) Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): ; 2002-. Search term Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®) Health Professional Version PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Published online: September 28, 2018. Created: April 23, 2004 . This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the late effects of treatment for childhood cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care

2018 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

33. Andrew Weil, the Coors Foundation, and Americans for Prosperity, or: “Integrative medicine” isn’t just for hippy dippy lefties anymore

Foundation is well known for promoting integrative medicine. Mr. Jackson said as much himself in his email, and the touts its projects with the (run, of course, by Andrew Weil), the , and the . For instance, the : The health insurance industry, and its practice of not reimbursing doctors who prescribe CAM-type treatments, creates a massive bottleneck that prevents promising integrative treatments from entering the medical mainstream. The Adolph Coors Foundation has awarded a gift to the Center (...) . The Samueli Center project involves using electroacupuncture (which, of course, isn't really acupuncture) to treat hypertension, while the Brind Center project is looking at high dose N-Acetyl-Cysteine as a treatment for breast and prostate cancer. So, yes, the Coors Foundation is deep into funding quackademic medicine and thus has a definite interest in promoting the acceptance of "integrative medicine." Although I highly doubt Mr. Jackson had any ulterior motives in trying to organize this debate, he

2015 Respectful Insolence

34. Clinical Practice guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia

Clinical Practice guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia NephrolDialTransplant (2014)29(Suppl.2):ii1–ii39 doi:10.1093/ndt/gfu040 AdvanceAccesspublication25February2014 ClinicalPracticeGuideline Clinicalpracticeguidelineondiagnosisandtreatment ofhyponatraemia GoceSpasovski 1 ,RaymondVanholder 2 ,BrunoAllolio 3 ,DjillaliAnnane 4 ,SteveBall 5 ,DanielBichet 6 , GuyDecaux 7 ,WiebkeFenske 3 ,EwoutJ.Hoorn 8 ,CaroleIchai 9 ,MichaelJoannidis 10 ,AlainSoupart 7 , RobertZietse 8 (...) tables1Aand1B). ? How did we translate the evidence into a differential diag- nosticstrategy? Wetranslatedthediagnosticevidenceintoadiagnostic decision tree, leading to a point wherespeci?cunderlying causes can be derived from the clinical setting or history (Fig. 6). However, for obvious reasons, this diagnostic tree is a simpli?cation and does not guarantee complete- ness in each individual. Of note, severely symptomatic hyponatraemia always requires immediate treatment, which should be prioritised over

2014 European Renal Best Practice

35. Treatment and recommendations for homeless people with Opioid Use Disorders

other health care providers and whether there is a regular source of primary care. Ask about all current and past medications and dietary supplements taken, including contraceptives, over-the- counter medicines, herbal remedies, dietary supplements, and any “borrowed” medicine prescribed for others. Ask about any problems adhering to prescribed treatment and any adverse or strange side effects noticed. Assess ability to take pills daily and return for follow-up care; ask about regular routines (...) Treatment and recommendations for homeless people with Opioid Use Disorders ADAPTING YOUR PRACTICE Recommendations for the Care of Homeless Patients with Opioid Use Disorders Opioid Use DisordersMarch 2014 ADAPTING YOUR PRACTICE Recommendations for the Care of Homeless Patients with Opioid Use Disorders Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network March 2014 Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network ADAPTING YOUR PRACTICE Recommendations for the Care of Homeless Patients with Opioid

2014 National Health Care for the Homeless Council

36. Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Health Professional Version Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®) - PDQ Cancer Information Summaries - NCBI Bookshelf Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US); 2002-. PDQ Cancer Information (...) Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): ; 2002-. Search term Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®) Health Professional Version PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Published online: September 28, 2018. Created: April 23, 2004 . This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the late effects of treatment for childhood cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care

2016 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

37. Mad Libs for medicine. Do you think you can use these?

patients. You have been accused of (mortal sin), (weight-lifting move), and (home improvement activity). Several reported that you acted like (famous jazz musician), and should be subjected to (unusual torture). On at least one occasion, you apparently told a patient “go (construction equipment) yourself and the (non-motorized vehicle) you rode in on.” This is clearly unacceptable. We expect more from our (menial laborers), and hope that you will try your best to meet the expectations of our (farm (...) Mad Libs for medicine. Do you think you can use these? Mad Libs for medicine. Do you think you can use these? Mad Libs for medicine. Do you think you can use these? | | July 5, 2015 71 Shares Do you remember Mad Libs from when you were a child? A story is filled with blanks, and as you fill them in with inappropriate and ridiculous words, you laugh until you can’t see straight. You laugh until you can’t breathe, and your parents beg you to stop! Let’s be children again. Share

2015 KevinMD blog

38. Shivering Treatment After Cesarean Delivery: Meperidine vs. Dexmedetomidine

, 2018 See Sponsor: Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM) Information provided by (Responsible Party): Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM) Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Comparing two treatments for shivering after cesarean delivery for labor dystocia under epidural anesthesia. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Cesarean Section Complications Drug: Dexmedetomidine Injection Drug: Meperidine Injection Phase 3 Detailed Description (...) Clinique randomisé Comparant la dexmédétomidine et la mépéridine Actual Study Start Date : May 7, 2017 Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 30, 2019 Estimated Study Completion Date : June 30, 2019 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: dexmedetomidine Unique dose of dexmedetomidine injection: intravenous injection 0.35 mcg/kg in two minutes if shivering 5 minutes after delivery

2017 Clinical Trials

39. Treatment and Recommendations for Homeless Patients with Chlamydial or Gonococcal Infections

of life for the patients they serve. Sharon Morrison, RN, MAT HCH Clinicians’ Network 1 Health Care for the Homeless projects are funded by the Bureau of Primary Health Care in the Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under Section 330(h) of the Public Health Services Act. Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network ADAPTING YOUR PRACTICE Treatment & Recommendations for Homeless Patients with Chlamydial/Gonococcal Infections Health Care (...) Treatment and Recommendations for Homeless Patients with Chlamydial or Gonococcal Infections 1 A DAPTING YOUR PR A CTICE Treatment and Recommendations for Homeless Patients with Chlamydial or Gonococcal Infections Chlamydial or Gonococcal Infections 2013 Edition 2 ADAPTING YOUR PRACTICE Treatment and Recommendations for Homeless Patients with Chlamydial or Gonococcal Infections Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network 2013 Edition 3 All material in this document is in the public domain

2013 National Health Care for the Homeless Council

40. Treatment and recommendations for homeless people with Chronic Non-Malignant Pain

for Homeless Adults with Chronic Non-Malignant Pain Barbara Wismer, MD, MPH (Chair) Physician, Internal & Preventive Medicine Tom Waddell Health Center/Homeless Programs San Francisco Department of Public Health San Francisco, California Ted Amann, MPH, RN Director of Healthcare, FQHC Project Director Central City Concern Portland, Oregon Rachel Diaz, MSW, LAc, LICSW, CDPT Social Worker, Acupuncturist, Chemical Dependency Specialist Former Acupuncture Program Manager Evergreen Treatment Services Seattle (...) Other References 49 Suggested Resources 55 Websites 57 About the HCH Clinicians‘ Network 57 Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network ADAPTING YOUR PRACTICE: Recommendations for the Care of Homeless Adults with Chronic Non-Malignant Pain vii APPENDICES A. Managing Pain in Patients with Co-occurring Substance Use Disorders: A Harm Reduction Addiction Medicine Perspective – Barry Zevin, MD, San Francisco Dept. of Public Health (SFDPH) B. Chronic Pain Assessment and Treatment Plan, SFDPH C

2011 National Health Care for the Homeless Council

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