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Emergency Contraception

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1. Addendum to the Canadian Consensus on Contraception - Emergency Contraception: 1) Excluding pre-existing pregnancy when inserting copper IUD and 2) Initiation of hormonal contraception after emergency contraception

Addendum to the Canadian Consensus on Contraception - Emergency Contraception: 1) Excluding pre-existing pregnancy when inserting copper IUD and 2) Initiation of hormonal contraception after emergency contraception Addendum to the Canadian Consensus on ContraceptionEmergency Contraception: 1) Excluding pre-existing pregnancy when inserting copper IUD and 2) Initiation of hormonal contraception after emergency contraception - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username (...) : Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 38, Issue 12, Pages 1150–1151 To read this article in full, please review your options for gaining access at the bottom of the page. Addendum to the Canadian Consensus on ContraceptionEmergency Contraception: 1) Excluding pre-existing pregnancy when inserting copper IUD and 2) Initiation of hormonal contraception after emergency contraception x Edith Guilbert , MD Quebec, Quebec x Sheila Dunn , MD Toronto, Ontario x Amanda Black , MD

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

2. Interventions for emergency contraception. (PubMed)

Interventions for emergency contraception. Emergency contraception (EC) is using a drug or copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) to prevent pregnancy shortly after unprotected intercourse. Several interventions are available for EC. Information on the comparative effectiveness, safety and convenience of these methods is crucial for reproductive healthcare providers and the women they serve. This is an update of a review previously published in 2009 and 2012.To determine which EC method following (...) unprotected intercourse is the most effective, safe and convenient to prevent pregnancy.In February 2017 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Popline and PubMed, The Chinese biomedical databases and UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme on Human Reproduction (HRP) emergency contraception database. We also searched ICTRP and ClinicalTrials.gov as well as contacting content experts and pharmaceutical companies, and searching reference lists of appropriate papers.Randomised

2019 Cochrane

4. What Interventions Are Most Effective for Emergency Contraception?

What Interventions Are Most Effective for Emergency Contraception? TAKE-HOME MESSAGE For emergency contraception, mifepristone (RU-486) is more effective than levonorgestrel (Plan B), which is more ef?cacious than an estradiol-levonorgestrel combination (Yuzpe) in preventing pregnancy. What Interventions Are Most Effective for Emergency Contraception? EBEM Commentators Brit Long, MD Michael D. April, MD, DPhil Department of Emergency Medicine San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education (...) inception to February 2017. Investigators also searched the Emergency Contraception Website, pharmaceutical company information, and reference lists of published articles. STUDY SELECTION Authors included randomized controlled trials comparing different emergency contraception methods or placebo, with intervention applied to women desiring emergency contraception after unprotected intercourse. Authors evaluated titles and abstracts of identi?ed studies and retrieved potentially relevant articles

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

5. RCN position statement: The role of school nurses in providing emergency contraception services in education settings

RCN position statement: The role of school nurses in providing emergency contraception services in education settings POLICY AND POSITION STATEMENTS RCN position statement The role of school nurses in providing emergency contraception services in education settingsTHE ROLE OF SCHOOL NURSES IN PROVIDING EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION SERVICES IN EDUCATION SETTINGS 2 Publication This is an RCN statement. A Policy/Position statement describes an explanation, a justification or a recommendation (...) for a course of action that reflects the RCN’s stance regarding a particular topic. Description This RCN position statement aims to clarify the responsibilities of school nurses when they are providing emergency hormonal contraception (EC) to students in education settings (schools, colleges, pupil referral units or any educational institution where there are young people). Publication date: March 2018 Review date: August 2020 The Nine Quality Standards This publication has met the nine quality standards

2018 Royal College of Nursing

6. Interventions for emergency contraception. (PubMed)

Interventions for emergency contraception. Emergency contraception (EC) is using a drug or copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) to prevent pregnancy shortly after unprotected intercourse. Several interventions are available for EC. Information on the comparative effectiveness, safety and convenience of these methods is crucial for reproductive healthcare providers and the women they serve. This is an update of a review previously published in 2009 and 2012.To determine which EC method following (...) unprotected intercourse is the most effective, safe and convenient to prevent pregnancy.In February 2017 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Popline and PubMed, The Chinese biomedical databases and UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme on Human Reproduction (HRP) emergency contraception database. We also searched ICTRP and ClinicalTrials.gov as well as contacting content experts and pharmaceutical companies, and searching reference lists of appropriate papers.Randomised

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2017 Cochrane

7. Levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: after an enzyme inducer, double the dose

Levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: after an enzyme inducer, double the dose Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''In the September issue of Prescrire International. Levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: after an enzyme inducer, double the dose'', 1 September 2017 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > In the September issue of Prescrire International. Levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: after an enzyme inducer, double the dose Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 (...) most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight In the September issue of Prescrire International. Levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: after an enzyme inducer, double the dose FREE DOWNLOAD This month's free sample from the New Products section explores important information to take into account when levonorgestrel is used for emergency contraception. Full text available for free download. Summary When

2017 Prescrire

8. EMA guidance on use of Esmya for fibroids does not change FSRH recommendations regarding use of ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception

EMA guidance on use of Esmya for fibroids does not change FSRH recommendations regarding use of ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception FSRH CEU response to European Medicines Agency recommendations regarding use of ulipristal acetate for management of uterine fibroids - Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare FSRH CEU response to European Medicines Agency recommendations regarding use of ulipristal acetate for management of uterine fibroids FSRH CEU response to European Medicines

2018 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

9. Canadian Contraception Consensus Chapter 3 Emergency Contraception

Canadian Contraception Consensus Chapter 3 Emergency Contraception Canadian Contraception Consensus Chapter 3 Emergency Contraception - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 37, Issue 10, Supplement, Pages S20–S28 Canadian Contraception Consensus Chapter 3 Emergency Contraception DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. The French version

2015 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

10. Emergency Contraception

Emergency Contraception FSRH CEU Clinical Guidance: Emergency Contraception - December 2017 - Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare FSRH CEU Clinical Guidance: Emergency Contraception - December 2017 FSRH CEU Clinical Guidance: Emergency Contraception - December 2017 Share this article Published on: 14 March 2017 File size: 976kb PDF File type: Current Clinical Guidance Author: FSRH Clinical Effectiveness Unit This document updates previous Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare (...) (FSRH) guidance and aims to summarise the available evidence on emergency contraception (EC). The guidance is intended for use by health professionals providing EC. This document was updated in December 2017. Your download should start automatically. If not . Document types Thinking about taking a qualification? Registration is now quick and easy online. About FSRH FSRH is a faculty of the Royal College of the Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. It was established on the 26th March 1993 as the Faculty

2017 Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare

11. Emergency contraception.

Emergency contraception. Emergency contraception. | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUN 09 2017 2018 2019 14 Apr 2018 - 13 Jul 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective dedicated to saving copies of rapidly dying or deleted websites for the sake of history and digital heritage. The group is 100% composed of volunteers and interested parties, and has expanded (...) ? The AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, guideline.gov) Web site will not be available after July 16, 2018 because federal funding through AHRQ will no longer be available to support the NGC as of that date. For additional information, read our . Guideline Summary NGC:011273 2017 Dec NEATS Assessment Emergency contraception. Clinical Effectiveness Unit. Emergency contraception. London (UK): Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH); 2017 Dec. 52 p. [116 references] This is the current

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

12. Access to Emergency Contraception

Access to Emergency Contraception Access to Emergency Contraception - ACOG Menu ▼ Access to Emergency Contraception Page Navigation ▼ Number 707, July 2017 (Replaces Committee Opinion Number 542, November 2012) Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women in collaboration with committee member Sarah Prager, MD, MAS. This information should (...) , or person. Neither ACOG nor its officers, directors, members, employees, or agents will be liable for any loss, damage, or claim with respect to any liabilities, including direct, special, indirect, or consequential damages, incurred in connection with this publication or reliance on the information presented Access to Emergency Contraception ABSTRACT: Emergency contraception refers to contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault

2017 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

13. Canadian Contraception Consensus Part 4 of 4 Chapter 9: Combined Hormonal Contraception

immediately (Quick Start) may improve short-term compliance and is not associated with an increase in unscheduled bleeding or other side effects (I). 11. The highest risk of ovulation occurs when the hormone-free interval is prolonged for more than 7 days, either by delaying the start of combined hormonal contraception (CHC) or by missing active hormone doses during the first or third weeks of CHC (I). Ovulation rarely occurs after 7 consecutive days of CHC use (II-2). 12. Emergency contraception (EC (...) Canadian Contraception Consensus Part 4 of 4 Chapter 9: Combined Hormonal Contraception No. 329-Canadian Contraception Consensus Part 4 of 4 Chapter 9: Combined Hormonal Contraception - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 4, Pages 229–268.e5 No. 329-Canadian Contraception Consensus Part 4 of 4 Chapter 9: Combined Hormonal Contraception x Amanda Black , (co-chair), MD (Principal Author) Ottawa, ON x

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

14. Ulipristal for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines

Ulipristal for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines Ulipristal for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Ulipristal for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines Ulipristal for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness, and Guidelines Published on: December 2, 2015 Project Number: RA0820-000 (...) Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness and safety of ulipristal compared to other interventions for emergency contraception? What is the cost-effectiveness of ulipristal compared to other interventions for emergency contraception? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding emergency contraception? Key Message Three systematic reviews, three randomized controlled trials, two non-randomized studies, and four

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

15. Role of the community pharmacist in emergency contraception counseling and delivery in the United States: current trends and future prospects (PubMed)

Role of the community pharmacist in emergency contraception counseling and delivery in the United States: current trends and future prospects Women and couples continue to experience unintended pregnancies at high rates. In the US, 45% of all pregnancies are either mistimed or unwanted. Mishaps with contraceptives, such as condom breakage, missed pills, incorrect timing of patch or vaginal ring application, contraceptive nonuse, forced intercourse, and other circumstances, place women at risk (...) of unintended pregnancy. There is a critical role for emergency contraception (EC) in preventing those pregnancies. There are currently three methods of EC available in the US. Levonorgestrel EC pills have been available with a prescription for over 15 years and over-the-counter since 2013. In 2010, ulipristal acetate EC pills became available with a prescription. Finally, the copper intrauterine device remains the most effective form of EC. Use of EC is increasing over time, due to wider availability

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2017 Integrated pharmacy research & practice

16. Effect of prenatal exposure of emergency contraceptives on health of exposed children: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effect of prenatal exposure of emergency contraceptives on health of exposed children: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

17. Emergency contraception: an intrauterine device is preferable in cases of overweight and obesity

Emergency contraception: an intrauterine device is preferable in cases of overweight and obesity Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Emergency contraception: an intrauterine device is preferable in cases of overweight and obesity'', 1 December 2014 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Emergency contraception: an intrauterine device is preferable in cases of overweight and obesity Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |  (...)  |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Emergency contraception: an intrauterine device is preferable in cases of overweight and obesity For overweight or obese women requiring emergency contraception, the fitting of an intrauterine device (IUD) is the first choice. Fitting a copper IUD within 5 days of unprotected sexual intercourse is a very effective means of postcoital or emergency contraception. A single dose of the progestin contraceptive levonorgestrel

2014 Prescrire

18. Quick starting hormonal contraception after using oral emergency contraception: a systematic review. (PubMed)

Quick starting hormonal contraception after using oral emergency contraception: a systematic review. Unprotected intercourse after oral emergency contraception (EC) significantly increases pregnancy risk. This underlies the importance of promptly starting effective, ongoing contraception - known as 'quick starting'. However, theoretical concern exists that quick starting might interact with EC or hormonal contraception (HC) potentially causing adverse side effects.A systematic review (...) taking combined oral contraception (COC). Another assessed cervical mucus impenetrability (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.27-2.13) while taking progestogen-only pills (POP). Quick starting POP reduced the ability of UPA to delay ovulation (OR 0.04; 95% CI 0.01-0.37). Side effects (OR 1.22; 95% CI 0.48-3.12) and unscheduled bleeding (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.16-1.81) were unaffected by quick starting COC after UPA. Another study reported higher self-reported contraceptive use at 8 weeks among women quick starting POP

2017 The Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care

19. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception (PubMed)

Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940 (...) ), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive

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2016 Geburtshilfe Und Frauenheilkunde

20. Use of non-emergency contraceptive pills and concoctions as emergency contraception among Nigerian University students: results of a qualitative study. (PubMed)

Use of non-emergency contraceptive pills and concoctions as emergency contraception among Nigerian University students: results of a qualitative study. Emergency contraception (EC) can significantly reduce the rate of unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the increasing awareness of EC among educated young women in Nigeria, the rate of utilisation remains low. This study therefore explores the main barriers to the use of EC among female university (...) students by analysing their knowledge of emergency contraception, methods ever used, perceived efficacy, and its acceptability.This paper brings together the findings from several focus groups (N = 5) and in-depth interviews (N = 20) conducted amongst unmarried female undergraduate students in two Nigerian universities.Participants considered the use of condom and abstinence as the most effective methods of preventing unplanned pregnancy. However, many participants were misinformed about emergency

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2016 BMC Public Health

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