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Electronic Prescription

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4342. The commodification of health care is destroying the doctor-patient relationship

and could prescribe whatever drug or test they felt necessary based on years of experience. While there was a strong doctor-patient relationship in those bygone days, it was not necessarily an equal partnership. Patriarchal doctors expected their advice to be followed and patients generally complied because they trusted their doctors. Patients today have lower expectations of their doctors, having never experienced a strong bond forged through generations of caregiving. Unless they need a prescription (...) . Limits must be set on astronomical copays and deductibles that drive patients away from their doctors. Eliminating the time-consuming and expensive middlemen of bureaucracy would not only help reduce costs but also would give back precious doctor-patient time — time that could be used for health caring. In theory, technology should free up time and allow doctors to spend more with their patients. Electronic medical records have fallen far short of this ideal, though, increasing provider frustration

2019 KevinMD blog

4343. Patient Dignity (Formerly:Patient Modesty): Volume 97

I have received for years during routine office visits, then again I'm at the disposable age [and male]. Everything else in my recent routine health care involves lab panels that AI is superior at analyzing and prescribing. The patient's medical history [EHR/EMR] is automatically retained and available to everyone not limited by HIPAA [joke]. Most prescriptions will be available when the patient leaves the booth from a system similar to technology used in warehouses for over 20 years, again (...) is going to stop all the meds and take his chances. He never wanted this procedure and does not want the prescription drug consequences their decision causes. The actions of the medical community and their godlike decrees have major and life altering consequences to its victims but they do not care and will continue to give themselves more power and control over their patient victims. This is the greatest power of modern medicine. The manner in which treatment is delivered has only worsened during

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4345. Patient Dignity (Formerly:Patient Modesty):Volume 101

married gay people as people worthy of being on this planet although priests molesting children seems to okay as the Catholic church gives them shelter & protection forever. Why I mention this is bc the 1st ER hospital my husband went to put in MRs that were transferred electronically to the Catholic hospital where he was sent that he was a gay man w/ a husband, me his actual female wife. So for hours this Catholic hospital thought he was gay. He didn't know what they thought as he was too drugged

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4346. Should we change how we treat mild asthma?

Should we change how we treat mild asthma? The AFP Community Blog: Should we change how we treat mild asthma? | Monday, September 23, 2019 - Jennifer Middleton, MD, MPH Inhaled corticosteroids are a mainstay for treating asthma; typically, they are prescribed on a scheduled basis, though . Two new studies may offer an alternative to scheduled inhaled corticosteroid dosing for patients with mild asthma. As described in the " ," these two randomized controlled trials compared the twice daily (...) years and older into three groups: twice daily placebo with an as needed terbutaline (a SABA) inhaler, twice daily placebo with as needed budesonide-formoterol, and twice daily budesonide with as needed terbutaline. Participants recorded daily peak expiratory flows, asthma symptoms, and nighttime awakenings using an electronic diary, and an electronic inhaler monitor recorded use of their as-needed inhaler. The researchers' primary outcome was "electronically recorded weeks of well-controlled asthma

2019 The AFP Community Blog

4347. Patient Dignity (Formerly:Patient Modesty):Volume 99

he did not get consent or the nurse is not going to say that she chose this patient to sexually abuse. The electronic systems make their coverup too easy. They literally just have to pick & click. This just reconfirms in our minds that it is not safe to seek hospital care where there is a chance they can use drugs to control & manipulate. Bc once they use drugs all the things you have done to maintain dignity & respect no longer matter to them. No, I do not think that any commencement speeches

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4348. Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty): Volume 94

-physician relationship (as opposed to the archaic, paternalistic term of the doctor-patient relationship). I am not sure exactly which volume I have brought this up in, but I argue that this is a more correct term as the patient is the primary member of importance in the relationship and thus put first. The term physician is also a more accurate term describing a person that is licensed to diagnose, treat, and prescribe. Three articles focus on the importance of shared decision making in individual (...) electronic devices should be carried by personnel carrying out patient care. 8. There are more but these come to mind first. Please feel free to add. JR At , said... PT Because people want those that care for their health and even their lives to consider them as human beings. They can't accept that patients are just objects to be processed at the convenience of the bureaucracy. Consider how people treat their family and friends when they are sick. These people can't imagine that anyone, with rare

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4350. Patient Dignity (Formerly:Patient Modesty):Volume 102

Banterings, “I have made healthcare as irrelevant as possible in my life.” No physicals, no old sucker poisons, no cancer screenings. Fluoroquinolones thoughtlessly prescribed to me have caused rapid cataract genesis, something they are “famous” for. I am using a natural substance to try and dissolve the cataracts, and seem to be making progress after 6 months. Having fired the ba%^stard that was my optometrist, I now have to find a new one and will report if eyesight is better, which will indicate some

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4351. Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 103

, and force procedures and vaccines upon one, including use of electronic monitoring afterwards. I can only hope climate change burns this fascist, violent, authoritarian nightmare to the ground! I see no other way, as most citizens of New China are fearful of real information and yeah, it's scary what is really going down! It's just so much easier to remain in ignorance, at least until they knock on one's door in the middle of the night! Yes, I have gotten much valid and useful health info from the web

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4353. Why doesn’t the allied health field play a larger role in the care of patients?

as part of a physician’s practice, and there’s a possibility they share the same electronic medical record (EMR). But that’s the exception, not the rule. Wouldn’t it make complete sense for everyone to be on the same page and work together and be paid a reasonable amount? Part of the problem with the allied health field is there is a gaping hole inconsistency regarding accreditation and regulation. Some fields call for full licensure, some only a certification. In terms of certification, some require (...) are connected to any state licensure. One does not even need to obtain a certification to market themselves as a “health coach.” While there’s a lot of variance in the accreditation process of those in the allied health field, there’s no question the importance these professions play in the role of the health of an individual and the overall care plan prescribed by the primary care physician. Rob Arnold is an exercise physiologist. Image credit: … … 89 Shares Tagged as: Subscribe to KevinMD and never miss

2019 KevinMD blog

4354. The old days of medicine are gone

and golf memberships at a mere fire sale. Gone are the days when physicians would be called “doctors” instead of “providers” and with it the respect that was once ascribed to the title. Gone are the days when a patient would ask: “But what does the doctor say?” instead of asking: “Will the insurance pay?” Gone are the days when a physician can direct the care of the patient or prescribe a medication or service(s), they deemed necessary. Even their prescription pads have lost most of their value as once (...) any prescription reaches the pharmacy it will mostly join the lot of those that will not be covered by insurers. Gone are the days where health insurance had a certain value. Instead, the ever limiting and continuously more expensive and less valuable commodity has become the new descriptive of having but a false security crutch called health care coverage. Gone are the days when physicians could perform thorough examinations on their patients. Instead, they have become thorough typists, chaotic

2019 KevinMD blog

4355. Inaction is driving our collective burnout

border, in community health centers, in prisons, on Native American reservations, in the hallways and exam rooms of some of the most esteemed academic medical centers in our country. I listened to these stories as part of my work with Primary Care Progress, a national nonprofit working to strengthen primary care teams and clinicians. As I spoke with several health care providers about the realities of their work, I expected to hear the usual concerns: the rise of the electronic medical record (...) prescription costs. Our health care providers don’t get to turn a blind eye to symptoms of America’s divisions and inactions. They also don’t get to decide who deserves treatment. The victim or the shooter. The immigrant or native born. The nationalist or the progressive. For clinicians, they’re all patients. But health care professionals do suffer the consequences of inaction. William Osler famously remarked, “Listen to your patients; they’re telling you their diagnosis.” We also need to listen to our

2019 KevinMD blog

4356. Patients and physicians need to talk more and tweet less

Patients and physicians need to talk more and tweet less Patients and physicians need to talk more and tweet less Patients and physicians need to talk more and tweet less | | January 8, 2019 50 Shares Long ago, and far away, I encountered a patient that changed the way I practice. I was with a medical student while examining a middle-aged woman who presented with a dramatic eruption that was probably DRESS syndrome (DRESS syndrome was not yet described). I prescribed prednisone and asked her (...) that even if the doctors were outstanding, an argument with a receptionist, a canceled appointment, or insurance glitch were responsible for a miserable experience. The reviewer warns patients to go elsewhere. Wouldn’t it be more effective to let the practice know to directly to address the issues? Destructive. Over nearly four decades of practice have I ever misdiagnosed a skin cancer? Prescribed a drug that did not work or yielded an adverse reaction? Have I ever not acquiesced to every patient

2019 KevinMD blog

4357. Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty): Volume 94

-physician relationship (as opposed to the archaic, paternalistic term of the doctor-patient relationship). I am not sure exactly which volume I have brought this up in, but I argue that this is a more correct term as the patient is the primary member of importance in the relationship and thus put first. The term physician is also a more accurate term describing a person that is licensed to diagnose, treat, and prescribe. Three articles focus on the importance of shared decision making in individual (...) electronic devices should be carried by personnel carrying out patient care. 8. There are more but these come to mind first. Please feel free to add. JR At , said... PT Because people want those that care for their health and even their lives to consider them as human beings. They can't accept that patients are just objects to be processed at the convenience of the bureaucracy. Consider how people treat their family and friends when they are sick. These people can't imagine that anyone, with rare

2019 Bioethics Discussion Blog

4358. The problem with abbreviations in the medical record

The problem with abbreviations in the medical record The problem with abbreviations in the medical record The problem with abbreviations in the medical record | | January 28, 2019 23 Shares Several patients seen in our practice recently were significantly and dramatically transformed by the electronic health record (EHR). And not in a good way. Take, for instance, the patient whose outside chart was reviewed when she showed up in our office for a follow-up appointment after an emergency (...) .” The medical documentation community has battled against abbreviations for many years, primarily because of the risk of an abbreviation being used by one person to mean one thing, and interpreted by someone else to mean something different altogether. Many years ago, when we used the electronic health record more as a word processing document, I remember seeing numerous occasions where a patient with MR (mitral regurgitation) was suddenly “transformed” into a patient with mental retardation. And vice versa

2019 KevinMD blog

4360. 5 steps clinicians can take to get back to their patients

at the base of this problem and follows with a prescription to get any medical office back on track. The heart of the matter of patient care Why are medical providers feeling they struggle more than ever with administrative duties? Park points to two main issues. “The first is mandates set by the Affordable Care Act to move to electronic health records,” she says. “In itself, this was always going to be a challenge. But many offices continue to struggle because they never had the proper contractor support

2019 KevinMD blog

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