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Elbow Anatomy

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121. Repaired distal biceps magnetic resonance imaging anatomy compared with outcome. (Abstract)

Repaired distal biceps magnetic resonance imaging anatomy compared with outcome. This study examined the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of an anterior incision distal biceps tendon repair and evaluated the association between appearance and outcome.Nineteen patients were randomly recruited to undergo an elbow MRI from a single-surgeon series of distal biceps repairs using an anterior approach. Tendon healing was evaluated by the integrity of the repair, the amount of heterogeneity (...) bone but demonstrates a wide variability in overall morphology that does not influence DASH or VAPS scores. A significant decrease in strength at 60° of supination appears to be an effect of an anterior tendon reattachment location.Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

122. Clavicle anatomy and the applicability of intramedullary midshaft fracture fixation. (Abstract)

Clavicle anatomy and the applicability of intramedullary midshaft fracture fixation. This study investigated the morphologic safety and applicability of intramedullary fixation of midshaft clavicle fractures by analyzing the pertinent clavicle anatomy using 3-dimensional computer simulation.Computed tomography was used to scan 22 skeletonized clavicles. Computer software was used to simulate middle-segment fracture fixation by fitting a cylindrical corridor within the clavicle in the area (...) to the acromioclavicular end.In most clavicles, straight intramedullary fixation appears to be a morphologically safe and effective method of fixation.Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

123. The anatomy of the proximal radius: implications on fracture implant design. (Abstract)

The anatomy of the proximal radius: implications on fracture implant design. The proximal radius features a complex anatomy. Several studies have been published on the anatomy using different technical approaches; however, most of these studies were conducted with a special focus on parameters relevant to radial prosthetic design. The purpose of our study was to explore the complex geometry of the proximal radius with regard to fracture implant design.Our computed tomography-based measurements (...) of 78 multiplanar reformatted radii allow for exact assessment of its geometry and offer a scientific rationale towards the design of fracture implants. We conducted measurements on the radial head, the radial neck, the radial tuberosity, the radial head-to-neck angle, and the safe zone.A wide range of normal anatomy has been demonstrated for all parameters. Sex differences are statistically significant in all registered parameters, except the radial head-to-neck angle. Although measurements

2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

124. Teres minor muscle and related anatomy. (Abstract)

Teres minor muscle and related anatomy. The purpose of this study was to describe the complex anatomy surrounding the teres minor muscle.Thirty-one cadaveric human shoulders were dissected. Qualitative fascial and neurovascular anatomy were described. Location of motor nerves to teres minor were measured in reference to local anatomy.Fascial anatomy of the posterior shoulder had 2 distinct and equally common variants, 1 of which demonstrated a stout, inflexible fascial compartment enveloping (...) of the accessory motor nerves coursed deep to the fascial sling nor to the distinct teres minor fascial compartment.A stout fascial sling may be the potential site of greatest compression and tethering of the primary motor nerve to teres minor. Additional lateral accessory motor nerves to teres minor remained extra-fascial and took a less angulated path. Half of the shoulders demonstrated a separate teres minor fascial compartment. An improved understanding of the fascial anatomy and innervation pattern

2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

125. Topsy-turvy locomotion: biomechanical specializations of the elbow in suspended quadrupeds reflect inverted gravitational constraints Full Text available with Trip Pro

Topsy-turvy locomotion: biomechanical specializations of the elbow in suspended quadrupeds reflect inverted gravitational constraints Some tetrapods hang upside down from tree branches when moving horizontally. The ability to walk in quadrupedal suspension has been acquired independently in at least 14 mammalian lineages. During the stance (supportive) phase of quadrupedal suspension, the elbow joint flexor muscles (not the extensors as in upright vertebrates moving overground) are expected (...) to contract to maintain the flexed limb posture. Therefore muscular control in inverted, suspended quadrupeds may require changes of muscle control, and even morphologies, to conditions opposite to those in upright animals. However, the relationships between musculoskeletal morphologies and elbow joint postures during the stance phase in suspended quadrupeds have not been investigated. Our analysis comparing postures and skeletal morphologies in Choloepus (Pilosa), Pteropus (Chiroptera), Nycticebus

2011 Journal of anatomy

126. Solitary paralysis of the flexor pollicis longus muscle after minimally invasive elbow procedures: anatomical and clinical study of the anterior interosseous nerve. (Abstract)

nerve supplying the flexor pollicis longus, the flexor digitorum profundus, and the pronator quadratus. Unusual etiologic conditions can occasionally cause isolated neuropathy of the flexor pollicis longus branch from the anterior interosseous nerve.Six patients presented with isolated paralysis of the flexor pollicis longus, four following venipuncture in the cubital fossa and two following arthroscopy of the elbow joint. Cadaveric dissections were performed to examine any anatomy clinically (...) Solitary paralysis of the flexor pollicis longus muscle after minimally invasive elbow procedures: anatomical and clinical study of the anterior interosseous nerve. The origin of the flexor pollicis longus muscle can vary, causing compression of the anterior interosseous nerve in the forearm. The topographic relationship of the flexor pollicis longus to the median and anterior interosseous nerves must be considered when these nerves are decompressed. The anterior interosseous nerve is a motor

2011 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

127. Vascular Anatomy of the Proximal Ulna. (Abstract)

Vascular Anatomy of the Proximal Ulna. To describe the intraosseous arterial anatomy of the proximal ulna.We used 9 fresh-frozen, above-elbow amputations to map the intraosseous arterial supply using the Spalteholtz technique. We treated 3 additional above-elbow amputations similarly, and then dissected them to map the extraosseous arterial supply. We recorded the extraosseous arterial patterns and compared them with the intraosseous arterial findings.The intraosseous arterial supply

2011 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

128. COVID-19 and Pregnant Patients

to that provided to any critically ill pregnant person ultrasound elective ultrasound exams should not be performed if risk of exposure and infection within the community is greater than benefit of testing, consider postponing or canceling some testing or exams detailed mid-trimester anatomy ultrasound examination may be considered following first trimester maternal COVID-19 infection ultrasound assessment of fetal growth is indicated in pregnant women with COVID-19 infection due to risk of fetal growth (...) if risk of exposure and infection within the community is greater than benefit of testing, consider postponing or canceling some testing or exams detailed midtrimester anatomy ultrasound examination may be considered following first trimester maternal COVID-19 infection ultrasound assessment of fetal growth is indicated in pregnant women with COVID-19 infection due to risk of fetal growth restriction for pregnancies with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 between 24 0/7 weeks and 33 6/7 weeks gestation

2020 DynaMed Plus

129. COVID-19 and Special Populations

conditions [ ]) European Academy of Neurology (EAN) recommendations on ALS and COVID-19 (2020 April 15) to reduce risk of COVID-19 infection stay at home and avoid visitors (including family), even if they do not have symptoms, to reduce risk of COVD-19 infection increase frequency of hand washing with soap, avoid hand-to-face contact, and clean surfaces with detergent caregivers should sneeze/cough into bent elbow or tissue (which should be discarded immediately) and then wash hands with soap follow (...) or exams detailed mid-trimester anatomy ultrasound examination may be considered following first trimester maternal COVID-19 infection ultrasound assessment of fetal growth is indicated in pregnant women with COVID-19 infection due to risk of fetal growth restriction all pregnant women with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection should receive prophylactic low molecular weight heparin upon admission to reduce risk of venous thromboembolism unless birth is expected within 12 hours antenatal

2020 DynaMed Plus

130. Clinical Practice Guideline on the Management of Rotator Cuff Injuries

. Matuszak, MD American Academy of Family Physicians Amee L. Seitz, PhD, PT American Physical Therapy Association Lori A. Michener, PhD, PT, ATC American Physical Therapy Association 1. Mark R. Hutchinson, MD American College of Sports Medicine Michael A. Shaffer, PT, ATC, OCS American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists Xinning Li, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Michael M. Albrecht, MD American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Christopher C. Schmidt, MD American Shoulder and Elbow (...) Surgeons John Kuhn, MD, MS American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Leesa Galatz, MD American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons View background material via the RC CPG eAppendix 1 View data summaries via the RC CPG eAppendix 2 17 NON-VOTING MEMBERS Oversight Chair Gregory A. Brown, MD, PhD AAOS Staff William O. Shaffer, MD Medical Director Jayson Murray, MA Director, Clinical Quality & Value Ryan Pezold, MA Manager, Clinical Quality & Value Development Kyle Mullen, MPH Manager, Clinical Quality & Value

2020 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

131. Nexplanon (etonogestrel) contraceptive implants: new insertion site to reduce rare risk of neurovascular injury and implant migration

: an implant should be inserted subdermally by a healthcare professional who has been – correct insertion of the implant just under the skin is essential to reduce the risk of neurovascular injury and the implant migrating through the vasculature review the for how to correctly insert the implant, including an amended diagram that illustrates: the new insertion site the correct position of the arm for insertion (flexed at the elbow with the woman’s hand underneath her head) how to view the needle (...) factors have been identified, potential risk factors include: deep insertion insertion in an inappropriate site insertion in thin arms Updated advice for insertion of the implant Following continued receipt of reports, the manufacturer of Nexplanon has further explored the anatomy of the arm to identify an insertion site with the lowest number of vascular/neurological structures. The recommended site for insertion is just under the skin at the inner side of the non-dominant upper arm about 8–10 cm

2020 MHRA Drug Safety Update

132. Guidelines For Professional Ultrasound Practice

Practice. Revision 3, December 2018 Minor amendments, March 2019. 3 2.12.1 Shoulder 97 2.12.2 Elbow 101 2.12.3 Wrist and hand 104 2.12.4 Hip 106 2.12.5 Knee 107 2.12.6 Foot and Ankle 109 2.12.7 Rheumatology Ultrasound Examinations 112 2. 13 ELASTOGRAPHY 122 2.14 CONTRAST ENHANCED ULTRASOUND (CEUS) 124 2.15 INTERVENTIONAL AND ‘EXTENDED SCOPE’ EXAMINATIONS (SONOGRAPHERS) 127 2.16 PATIENT GROUP DIRECTIONS 127 2.17 ACQUISITION, ARCHIVING AND USE OF ULTRASOUND DATA 130 2.18 AUDIT AND LEARNING FROM

2019 British Medical Ultrasound Society

133. AIUM Practice Parameter for the Performance of a Peripheral Venous Ultrasound Examination

of the appropriate ultrasound examination and should be consistent with relevant legal and local health care facility requirements. Speci?cationoftheExamination The requesting health care provider should be encouraged to provide the pretest probability of acute DVT and/or the results of a D-dimer assay, if known. 3,14,15 Note: The words proximal and distal refer to the relative distance from the attached end of the limb per Gray’s Anatomy. For example, the proximal femoral vein is closer to the hip (...) , and brachiocephalic (innominate) veins as well as compression grayscale ultrasound of the brachial, basilic, cephalic, internal jugular, and axillary veins in the upper arm to the elbow. All accessi- ble veins should be scanned by optimal grayscale and Doppler techniques as well as appropriate positioning. Venous compression is applied to accessible veins in the transverse plane with ade- quate pressure on the skin to completely obliter- ate the normal vein lumen. The supine position, if possible, is preferred

2020 American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

134. Respiratory distress and CPAP

B: Emergency management of pneumothorax 16 Appendix C: Chest x rays neonatal respiratory distress 20 Acknowledgements 21 List of Tables Table 1. Consultation, retrieval or transfer 7 Table 2. Respiratory distress 7 Table 3. Care principles 8 Table 4. CPAP administration 9 Table 5. Clinical course 10 Table 6. Complications 11 Table 7. Neonatal care 12 Table 8. Other therapies 13 List of Figures Figure 1. Needle aspiration 16 Figure 2. ICC insertion with trocar 17 Figure 3. Anatomy (...) of a pneumothorax. Cross sectional view looking up towards the head 18 Figure 4: Anatomy of a pneumothorax. Lateral view 18 Figure 5. ICC insertion 19 Figure 6. ICC insertion and taping 19 Figure 7: Pneumothorax 20 Figure 8: Pneumothorax with ICC 20 Queensland Clinical Guideline: Neonatal respiratory distress including CPAP Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 6 of 21 1 Introduction Respiratory distress in a neonate presents as tachypnoea after birth. Symptoms can last from hours

2020 Queensland Health

135. Overview of sport-related injuries

and pain exacerbated by increased activity and use of the involved joint, Crawford DC, Safran MR. Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2006;14:90-100. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16467184?tool=bestpractice.com Yamaguchi K, Sweet FA, Bindra R, et al. The extraosseous and intraosseous arterial anatomy of the adult elbow. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1997;79:1653-1662. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9384425?tool=bestpractice.com and pain at the posteromedial aspect (...) pain, which is typically aggravated by overhead activities. Other symptoms include shoulder weakness, loss of range of movement, and night pain. Complete separation of 2 articulating bony surfaces, often the result of high-speed energy. Common dislocations include the shoulder, elbow, finger, patella, hip, and knee. Delayed treatment can result in irreparable damage to the joint surface with lifelong consequences and post-traumatic arthritis. A chronic fibrosing condition characterised by insidious

2018 BMJ Best Practice

136. Overview of occupational overuse syndromes

and cumulative stresses to the spinal anatomy. Shelerud RA. Epidemiology of occupational low back pain. Clin Occup Environ Med. 2006;5:501-528. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16963373?tool=bestpractice.com The aetiology of cervical spondylosis is underlying spontaneous joint degeneration. It is related to age, and to wear and tear. Binder AI. Cervical spondylosis and neck pain. BMJ. 2007;334:527-531. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17347239?tool=bestpractice.com Rao RD, Currier BL, Albert TJ, et al (...) of the forearm muscles that originate at the elbow. Both medial and lateral epicondylitis have been associated with repetitive elbow and forearm activities, such as hammering, typing, meat-cutting, plumbing, and painting, as well as leisure activities including tennis and golf. A group of entities with a common pathology involving the extrinsic tendons of the hand and wrist and their corresponding retinacular sheaths. Repetitive shear stress through the retinacular sheath causes irritation to the tendon

2018 BMJ Best Practice

137. Guidelines For Professional Ultrasound Practice

and neonatal liver and biliary system (including pancreas and spleen) 70 2.11.2 Paediatric urinary system 74 2.11.3 Paediatric gastro-intestinal tract 75 2.11.4 Neonatal hip 76 2.11.5 Neonatal intracranial ultrasound 77 2.12 Musculoskeletal ultrasound examinations 78 Examination specific guidelines and common scenarios 2.12.1 Shoulder 78 2.12.2 Elbow 84 2.12.3 Wrist and hand 88 2.12.4 Hip 91 2.12.5 Knee 94 2.12.6 Foot and ankle 97 2.12.7 Rheumatology ultrasound examinations 101 2.13 Elastography 111 2.14

2018 British Medical Ultrasound Society

140. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

of US, sonographic diagnosis of compressive effects upon the brachial plexus is a challenge [34], and symptoms of TOS may unmask a deeper regional pathology such as Pancoast tumor or cervical spondylopathy, requiring further imaging. Computed Tomography Angiography Contrast-enhanced CT evaluation of TOS is typically performed as a 2-step procedure in which initial “neutral” images are obtained from elbow to aortic arch with the arms adducted to the side, followed by abduction and repeat imaging (...) (MRI) is now a widely available and utilized modality for reliable, reproducible, noninvasive, and nonionizing evaluation of the vasculature, nervous system, and soft tissues [43]. MRI has inherent advantages over US in its ability to delineate extravascular anatomy, particularly in anatomic sites with poor sonographic windows, and it has advantages over CT in its characterization and differentiation of soft tissues. MRI does, however, have contraindications and is not recommended in certain

2019 American College of Radiology

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