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Ear Canal Foreign Body

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1. Ear Canal Foreign Body

Ear Canal Foreign Body Ear Canal Foreign Body Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ear Canal Foreign Body Ear Canal Foreign (...) Body Aka: Ear Canal Foreign Body , Ear Foreign Body , Auditory Canal Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. Causes s Plastic toys or beads Cotton, paper Organic material such as popcorn kernals or vegetable material Higher risk of infection Small batteries (may be caustic!, especially button batteries) Require removal without delay III. Symptoms IV. Precautions Removal risks injury First attempts at removal are most likely to succeed Best succes is for graspable objects (e.g. paper) Risk of ear

2018 FP Notebook

2. Pediatric ear foreign body retrieval: A comparison across specialties. (PubMed)

Pediatric ear foreign body retrieval: A comparison across specialties. To analyze what characteristics of patients and/or ear foreign bodies should prompt referral to otolaryngology with the goal to maximize successful removal and minimize complications.This was a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who presented for ear foreign body removal from January to December 2016 at a tertiary hospital center. Data collection included successful removal, major or minor complications, use (...) of general or conscious sedation, use of otic or oral antibiotics, age of patient, comorbid behavioral disorders, and foreign body characteristics. Major complications included tympanic membrane perforation or ossicular damage. Minor complications included injury of the canal wall. Patients with retained or extruded tympanostomy tubes were excluded.Of 275 patients aged 1-18 years, 16% presented initially to otolaryngology (ENT), 48.4% presented to the emergency department (ED), 21.8% presented

2019 American Journal of Otolaryngology

3. Removing foreign bodies in the external auditory canal

Removing foreign bodies in the external auditory canal Removing foreign bodies in the external auditory canal – PEMBlog Search for: Search for: Removing foreign bodies in the external auditory canal External auditory canal foreign bodies are most commonly seen in children under 7. Children with conditions that cause irritation of the ear such as otitis media or cerumen impaction are at higher risk. Additional risk factors include pica and ADHD. Most often, the foreign body is on the right side (...) due to the handedness of the child. The most common foreign bodies found in the external auditory canal include beads, pebbles, pieces of paper, toys, popcorn kernels and insects. Frequently, foreign bodies of the external auditory canal are asymptomatic and found during routine otoscopy. However, they may cause impaired hearing, pain, purulent or bloody drainage from the ear or chronic cough/hiccups (which is rare). Timing of removal is dependent upon the type of foreign body Button batteries

2017 PEM Blog

4. Masticator Space Foreign Body in a Child Presenting With Otorrhea and Granulation Tissue of the External Auditory Canal. (PubMed)

Masticator Space Foreign Body in a Child Presenting With Otorrhea and Granulation Tissue of the External Auditory Canal. We report an unusual case of masticator space foreign body in a patient presenting with otorrhea and granulation tissue within the external auditory canal (EAC).Case report.A 16-month-old male presented with fever, unilateral otorrhea, facial swelling, leukocytosis, and granulation tissue within the EAC that failed to respond to conventional medical treatment. Computed (...) tomography scan showed EAC and middle ear opacification and soft tissue swelling involving the masticator space. Given concerns for malignancy, biopsies of tissue within the EAC and of a newly detected right buccal mass were performed, revealing granulation tissue. Concern persisted for neoplasm, however, and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained, showing a masticator space foreign body and possible osteomyelitis of the mandible and pterygoid plates. The patient underwent urgent operative removal

2016 Rhinology and Laryngology

5. Hearing aid silicone impression material as a foreign body in the middle ear. (PubMed)

Hearing aid silicone impression material as a foreign body in the middle ear. We report an extremely rare case of hearing aid silicone impression material as a foreign body in the middle ear. Symptoms of the patient were otorrhea and vertigo after taking of a mold impression on his only hearing ear, and the symptoms mimicked chronic otitis media. A temporal bone CT scan revealed foreign body material in the middle ear and Eustachian tube. An intact canal wall mastoidectomy with a facial recess (...) approach and type IV tympanoplasty was performed to remove the silicone impression material. In addition to the case report, we review the literature regarding impression material foreign bodies.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2016 American Journal of Otolaryngology

6. Management of aural foreign body: an evaluative study in 738 consecutive cases. (PubMed)

Management of aural foreign body: an evaluative study in 738 consecutive cases. Foreign body in aural canal is a common ENT (ears, nose, and throat) emergency, although not always managed by an otolaryngologist. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment of this emergent problem by medical personnel other than otolaryngologist.A retrospective study in 738 consecutive cases with an internal control group was carried out at the Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi (...) by otolaryngologist.The collected data, when put to statistical examination, clearly indicate that patients manipulated by medical personnel other than ENT surgeon have a much higher chance of complication and GA induction for removal of foreign body. This underlines the importance of strict otolaryngologist management in all cases.

2017 American Journal of Otolaryngology

7. Ear Canal Foreign Body

Ear Canal Foreign Body Ear Canal Foreign Body Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ear Canal Foreign Body Ear Canal Foreign (...) Body Aka: Ear Canal Foreign Body , Ear Foreign Body , Auditory Canal Foreign Body From Related Chapters II. Causes s Plastic toys or beads Cotton, paper Organic material such as popcorn kernals or vegetable material Higher risk of infection Small batteries (may be caustic!, especially button batteries) Require removal without delay III. Symptoms IV. Precautions Removal risks injury First attempts at removal are most likely to succeed Best succes is for graspable objects (e.g. paper) Risk of ear

2015 FP Notebook

8. Difficult button battery ear foreign body removal: the magnetic solution. (PubMed)

Difficult button battery ear foreign body removal: the magnetic solution. Removing a button battery from the ear can be a tricky and challenging procedure.We describe the innovative use of a magnetic telescopic rod to successfully remove a button battery from the ear canal of a nine-year-old boy.We propose that this equipment should be available in ENT clinics and operating theatres to be used for removing foreign bodies made from ferrous materials.

2014 Journal of Laryngology & Otology

9. Foreign Body Removal, Ear

of foreign bodies from the ear is indicated whenever a well-visualized foreign body is identified in the external auditory canal and an uncomplicated first attempt is anticipated. Previous Next: Contraindications See the list below: The presence of a , contact of a foreign body with the tympanic membrane, or incomplete visualization of the auditory canal are indications for urgent-emergent ENT consultation for removal by operative microscope and speculum. If button batteries or hearing aid batteries (...) are involved, emergent ENT consultation is always warranted because time-sensitive liquefaction necrosis may lead to subsequent tympanic membrane perforation and further complications. In fact, irrigation should never be attempted in such cases, as it accelerates the necrotic process. [ ] , [ ] Previous Next: Anesthesia See the list below: Local anesthesia is invasive and is not generally used for uncomplicated ear foreign body removal because of the complex innervations of the external ear canal

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Foreign Bodies, Ear (Follow-up)

accounted for 85.9% of the 17,325 foreign bodies removed from the auditory canal. [ ] Various objects may be found in the ear, including toys, beads, stones, folded paper, and biologic materials such as insects or seeds. A study by Svider et al using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System estimated that from 2008 to 2012, there were 280,939 emergency department visits in the United States for aural foreign bodies, with children aged 2-8 years being the most frequent patients. Jewelry (...) to tell the examiner that there is something in their ear, but this is not always true. For example, an older adult with a hearing aid may lose a button battery or hearing aid in their canal and not realize it. Children, depending on age, may be able to indicate that they have a foreign body, or they may present with complaints of ear pain or discharge. Patients may be in significant discomfort and complain of nausea or vomiting if a live insect is in the ear canal. Patients may present with hearing

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

11. Foreign Bodies, Ear (Treatment)

accounted for 85.9% of the 17,325 foreign bodies removed from the auditory canal. [ ] Various objects may be found in the ear, including toys, beads, stones, folded paper, and biologic materials such as insects or seeds. A study by Svider et al using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System estimated that from 2008 to 2012, there were 280,939 emergency department visits in the United States for aural foreign bodies, with children aged 2-8 years being the most frequent patients. Jewelry (...) to tell the examiner that there is something in their ear, but this is not always true. For example, an older adult with a hearing aid may lose a button battery or hearing aid in their canal and not realize it. Children, depending on age, may be able to indicate that they have a foreign body, or they may present with complaints of ear pain or discharge. Patients may be in significant discomfort and complain of nausea or vomiting if a live insect is in the ear canal. Patients may present with hearing

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

12. Foreign Bodies, Ear (Diagnosis)

accounted for 85.9% of the 17,325 foreign bodies removed from the auditory canal. [ ] Various objects may be found in the ear, including toys, beads, stones, folded paper, and biologic materials such as insects or seeds. A study by Svider et al using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System estimated that from 2008 to 2012, there were 280,939 emergency department visits in the United States for aural foreign bodies, with children aged 2-8 years being the most frequent patients. Jewelry (...) to tell the examiner that there is something in their ear, but this is not always true. For example, an older adult with a hearing aid may lose a button battery or hearing aid in their canal and not realize it. Children, depending on age, may be able to indicate that they have a foreign body, or they may present with complaints of ear pain or discharge. Patients may be in significant discomfort and complain of nausea or vomiting if a live insect is in the ear canal. Patients may present with hearing

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

13. Foreign Bodies, Ear (Overview)

accounted for 85.9% of the 17,325 foreign bodies removed from the auditory canal. [ ] Various objects may be found in the ear, including toys, beads, stones, folded paper, and biologic materials such as insects or seeds. A study by Svider et al using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System estimated that from 2008 to 2012, there were 280,939 emergency department visits in the United States for aural foreign bodies, with children aged 2-8 years being the most frequent patients. Jewelry (...) to tell the examiner that there is something in their ear, but this is not always true. For example, an older adult with a hearing aid may lose a button battery or hearing aid in their canal and not realize it. Children, depending on age, may be able to indicate that they have a foreign body, or they may present with complaints of ear pain or discharge. Patients may be in significant discomfort and complain of nausea or vomiting if a live insect is in the ear canal. Patients may present with hearing

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

14. Images in clinical medicine: An unusual auricular foreign body. (PubMed)

Images in clinical medicine: An unusual auricular foreign body. A 48-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with severe otalgia of 1 day's duration. Bloody otorrhea in the left ear was noted after her hearing aid was removed. A video shows findings in the auditory canal.

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2014 NEJM

15. Ear Examination

by doing so should be recorded. The examiner shall then carefully guide the tip of the speculum (attached to the otoscope) into the ear canal while observing the ear (not necessarily through the viewfinder of the otoscope). The examination of the ear canal and tympanic membrane shall be conducted carefully and safely, taking into account the size, shape, orientation and condition of the ear canal and the presence of wax or foreign bodies. The examiner shall also take into account that the bony portion (...) should seek to detect, if present, earwax, foreign bodies, abnormalities of the ear canal (such as discharge/debris, inflammation, swelling, bleeding) and abnormalities of the tympanic membrane or middle ear (including swelling, inflammation, perforation, retraction, discolouration, the absence of visible malleus or other middle-ear landmarks and the presence of fluid). 4 The entire ear canal and tympanic membrane might not be visible at once. It is therefore often necessary to observe different

2016 British Society of Audiology

16. Otitis Media with Effusion in Children and Its Correlation with Foreign Body in the External Auditory Canal (PubMed)

Otitis Media with Effusion in Children and Its Correlation with Foreign Body in the External Auditory Canal Otitis Media with Effusion (OME) is difined as the chronic accumulation of mucus within the middle ear and sometimes the mastoid air cell system. Significant hearing loss may go unnoticed and may result in improper development of speech and language. Foreign bodies in the external auditory canal of paediatric patients are commonly encountered in day-to-day practice. The purpose was to see (...) if there is any relation between foreign bodies in ears and otitis media with effusion. A prospective study of consecutive cases was conducted between August 2005 and August 2007 at a teaching hospital. All children presenting with the history of a foreign body in the external auditory canal were included in this study. 50/74 that is 67.8% of the children in the study group had abnormal findings in the tympanogram whereas only 28/74 that is 37.8% children from the control group had abnormal findings

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2011 Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery

17. Hazardous complications of animate foreign bodies in otology practice. (PubMed)

Hazardous complications of animate foreign bodies in otology practice. Animate foreign bodies in the ear are frequent occurrences in otology practice. Such foreign bodies may lead to hazardous complications.This paper describes a retrospective study of six patients with a recent history of an insect in the ear who presented with various complications following intervention received elsewhere.An insect was retrieved from the external auditory canal in four cases and from the antrum in two cases (...) . The patients presented with progressive otological complications: two patients who presented with orbital apex syndrome and cavernous sinus thrombosis succumbed to the disease; three patients suffered sensorineural hearing loss; and two patients had persistent facial palsy. One patient with sigmoid sinus thrombosis, who presented early, experienced complete recovery.Insects in the ear can lead to hazardous complications. Animate foreign bodies should preferably be managed by a trained otologist, even

2015 Journal of Laryngology & Otology

18. Foreign body resulting in chronic otomastoiditis and facial palsy. (PubMed)

Foreign body resulting in chronic otomastoiditis and facial palsy. We present a case of a foreign body in the ear of 5-year-old girl child. She presented with features of chronic suppurative otitis media with facial nerve palsy. On exploration exuberant granulation was found in attic and middle ear. A foreign body (seed) was found buried within the granulation tissue which was removed. Bony facial canal was dehiscent in the tympanic segment. She had recovery of facial nerve function. The case (...) is being reported to increase awareness among otolaryngologist and to consider foreign body as a differential diagnosis in cases of complicated CSOM; especially in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

2014 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

19. Pediatric Cotton-Tip Applicator-Related Ear Injury Treated in United States Emergency Departments, 1990-2010. (PubMed)

documented reasons for visiting the ED. The presence of a foreign body (29.7%) and tympanic membrane perforation (25.3%) were common diagnoses.Most CTA-related injuries occurred with children themselves handling CTAs while cleaning their ears. Foreign body and tympanic membrane perforation were the most common associated diagnoses. Despite warnings against the use of CTAs in the ear canal and use of CTAs by children, these injuries continued to occur. Additional injury prevention strategies through (...) injuries in US hospital EDs. There was a nonsignificant increase in the annual number of injuries from 1990 through 2001 (78.2%) and a significant decrease from 2001 through 2010 (26.0%). Younger children sustained the highest rate of injury (32.2 per 100 000 for age 0-3 years). Ear cleaning was the most frequently documented circumstance at the time of injury (73.2%), and patients themselves were most commonly handling the CTA (76.9%). Foreign body sensation (39.2%) and bleeding (34.8%) were commonly

2017 Journal of Pediatrics

20. Increase in Pediatric Magnet-Related Foreign Bodies Requiring Emergency Care. (PubMed)

Increase in Pediatric Magnet-Related Foreign Bodies Requiring Emergency Care. We describe magnetic foreign body injuries among children and obtain national estimates of magnetic foreign body injury incidence over time.We searched the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for cases of magnetic foreign bodies in children younger than 21 years in the United States, from 2002 to 2011. Cases were analyzed by location: alimentary or respiratory tract, nasal cavity, ear canal, or genital (...) area.We identified 893 cases of magnetic foreign bodies, corresponding to 22,581 magnetic foreign body cases during a 10-year period (95% confidence interval [CI] 17,694 to 27,469). Most magnetic foreign bodies were ingested (74%) or intranasal (21%). Mean age was 5.2 years for ingested magnetic foreign bodies and 10.1 years for nasal magnetic foreign bodies (difference 4.9; 95% CI 4.1 to 5.6), suggesting different circumstances of injury. The incidence of pediatric magnet ingestions increased from

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine

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