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Ear Canal Acidification

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1. Ear Canal Acidification

Ear Canal Acidification Ear Canal Acidification Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ear Canal Acidification Ear Canal (...) Acidification Aka: Ear Canal Acidification , Otic Acetic Acid , Otic Domeboro , VoSol From Related Chapters II. Indications III. Mechanism Acidifies the ear canal IV. Efficacy As effective as Cortisporin V. Preparations Acetic acid 2% (white vinegar) drops for 7 days Aqueous acetic acid solution (Otic Domeboro) Also available with Propylene glycol solution of acetic acid (VoSol) Acetic acid 5% and rubbing 1:1 mix Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from

2018 FP Notebook

2. Ear Canal Acidification

Ear Canal Acidification Ear Canal Acidification Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ear Canal Acidification Ear Canal (...) Acidification Aka: Ear Canal Acidification , Otic Acetic Acid , Otic Domeboro , VoSol From Related Chapters II. Indications III. Mechanism Acidifies the ear canal IV. Efficacy As effective as Cortisporin V. Preparations Acetic acid 2% (white vinegar) drops for 7 days Aqueous acetic acid solution (Otic Domeboro) Also available with Propylene glycol solution of acetic acid (VoSol) Acetic acid 5% and rubbing 1:1 mix Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from

2015 FP Notebook

3. Role of pH of External Auditory Canal in Acute Otitis Externa (PubMed)

Role of pH of External Auditory Canal in Acute Otitis Externa Prospective and interventional. We studied the pH of external auditory canal (EAC) in normal individuals and patients with acute otitis externa (AOE), its variation with change of temperature and humidity, different symptoms and number of symptoms at presentation (Day 0) and various stages of treatment in 100 normal ears and forearms and 50 ears having AOE. The mean pH of normal EAC was 3.950 ± 1.199 while that of forearm was 4.775 (...)  ± 0.910. There was increase in the number of patients with increase in relative humidity, however, the change in the pH of EAC was statistically not significant (p > 0.05). Significant fall in pH was observed at 1 and 2 weeks of treatment. The normal EAC pH is relatively more acidic as compared to that of forearm skin and it became more alkaline in cases of AOE with reversion back to acidic pH after treatment. Acidification of the EAC is the only treatment required in most cases. No significant change

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2013 Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery

4. Fungal Otitis Externa

Externa Aka: Fungal Otitis Externa , Otomycosis , Jungle Ear From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Accounts for 10% of cases More common cause of cases III. Etiology niger (80 to 90% of cases) Black exudate Candida albicans (second most common cause) Cheesy white exudate Actinomyces Trichophyton IV. Risk Factors Extremely moist, hot environments Chronic V. Symptoms Significant more than pain Sensation of ear fullness Protracted course of VI. Signs Whitish-grey, yellow or black canal exudate Looks (...) like a Fungal Cave VII. Differential Diagnosis VIII. Labs (10% KOH) Fungal hyphae on slide IX. Management See for ral measures (Ear toilet) Cleaning and debriding ear is paramount Topical Medications 2% qid for 5 to 7 days and White Vinegar 1:1 mix as drops in ear s Indicated if acidification not effective Preparations: Intact (1%) drops M-cresyl acetate (Cresylate) Preparation: Tolnaftate 1% Solution (Tinactin) Systemic Indicated for refractory infection Preparation: ( ) s for 48 hours X

2018 FP Notebook

5. Change of external auditory canal pH in acute otitis externa. (PubMed)

Change of external auditory canal pH in acute otitis externa. We investigated (1) the correlation between the degree of acute otitis externa (AOE) and a change of pH and (2) the recovery of pH after acidification compared to an antibiotic otic solution in AOE. A change of pH in the external auditory canal (EAC) is very important for the pathogenesis of otitis externa. Therefore, not only an antibiotic otic solution, but also acidification, is known to be a good treatment for AOE. However, pH (...) has only been investigated in chronic otitis externa, and not in AOE.This was a prospective randomized control study. Forty adult patients (56 ears) with AOE and 40 normal control subjects (80 ears) participated in this study. The severity of disease was graded as mild, moderate, or severe. The pH of each EAC was then measured. The patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups: one for vinegar irrigation and the other for topical antibiotics. The pH of the diseased ears was measured at 1 and 2

2009 The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology

6. Fungal Otitis Externa

Externa Aka: Fungal Otitis Externa , Otomycosis , Jungle Ear From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Accounts for 10% of cases More common cause of cases III. Etiology niger (80 to 90% of cases) Black exudate Candida albicans (second most common cause) Cheesy white exudate Actinomyces Trichophyton IV. Risk Factors Extremely moist, hot environments Chronic V. Symptoms Significant more than pain Sensation of ear fullness Protracted course of VI. Signs Whitish-grey, yellow or black canal exudate Looks (...) like a Fungal Cave VII. Differential Diagnosis VIII. Labs (10% KOH) Fungal hyphae on slide IX. Management See for ral measures (Ear toilet) Cleaning and debriding ear is paramount Topical Medications 2% qid for 5 to 7 days and White Vinegar 1:1 mix as drops in ear s Indicated if acidification not effective Preparations: Intact (1%) drops M-cresyl acetate (Cresylate) Preparation: Tolnaftate 1% Solution (Tinactin) Systemic Indicated for refractory infection Preparation: ( ) s for 48 hours X

2015 FP Notebook

7. Earwax

Earwax Earwax - Wikipedia Earwax From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Earwax Other names Cerumen Wet-type human earwax Pronunciation Cerumen Earwax , also known by the medical term cerumen , is a gray, orange, red or yellowish substance secreted in the of humans and other mammals. It protects the skin of the human ear canal, assists in cleaning and lubrication, and also provides protection against , , , and water. Earwax consists of , hair, and the secretions of the and of the . Major (...) components of earwax are , both and , alcohols, , and . Excess or compacted cerumen can press against the or block the outside ear canal or hearing aids, potentially causing . Contents Physiology [ ] Earwax Wet-type human earwax on a Dry-type earwax Cerumen is produced in the outer third of the portion of the ear canal. It is a mixture of from and less-viscous ones from modified . The primary components of earwax are shed layers of skin, with, on average, 60% of the earwax consisting of , 12–20

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2012 Wikipedia

8. Lack of pendrin HCO3- transport elevates vestibular endolymphatic [Ca2+] by inhibition of acid-sensitive TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels. (PubMed)

Lack of pendrin HCO3- transport elevates vestibular endolymphatic [Ca2+] by inhibition of acid-sensitive TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels. The low Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) of mammalian endolymph in the inner ear is required for normal hearing and balance. We reported (Yamauchi et al., Biochem Biophys Res Commun 331: 1353-1357, 2005) that the epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 (transient receptor potential types 5 and 6) are expressed in the vestibular system and that TRPV5 expression (...) is stimulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), as also reported in kidney. TRPV5/6 channels are known to be inhibited by extracellular acidic pH. Endolymphatic pH, [Ca(2+)], and transepithelial potential of the utricle were measured in Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger pendrin (SLC26A4) knockout mice in vivo. Slc26a4(-/-) mice exhibit reduced pH and utricular endolymphatic potential and increased [Ca(2+)]. Monolayers of primary cultures of rat semicircular canal duct cells were grown on permeable supports

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2007 American Journal of Physiology. Renal physiology

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