How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

10,381 results for

E/M Medical Decision Making

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

101. Beyond consent--the ethics of decision-making in emergency medicine. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Beyond consent--the ethics of decision-making in emergency medicine. 847978 1977 05 12 2018 11 13 0093-0415 126 2 1977 Feb The Western journal of medicine West. J. Med. Beyond consent--the ethics of decision-making in emergency medicine. 156-9 Tait K K Winslow G G eng Journal Article United States West J Med 0410504 0093-0415 E IM Decision Making Emergency Medicine Ethics, Medical Humans Informed Consent Paternalism Personal Autonomy Wounds and Injuries therapy 06292 KIE BoB Subject Heading (...) : PROLONGATION OF LIFE/EMERGENCY CARE Full author name: Tait, Karen M Full author name: Winslow, Gerald 1977 2 1 1977 2 1 0 1 1977 2 1 0 0 ppublish 847978 PMC1237490 JAMA. 1974 Jul 8;229(2):172-6 4406917 N Engl J Med. 1974 Apr 18;290(16):907-8 4816967 J Leg Med (N Y). 1975 Oct;3(9):15-9 1081111 Hastings Cent Rep. 1975 Jun;5(3):9-10, 47 1150424 J Pediatr. 1975 Aug;87(2):327-8 1151575 J Trauma. 1975 Feb;15(2):94-8 1113362 Neb Law Rev. 1975;54(1):66-92 11664487 New Engl Law Rev. 1974 Winter;9(2):293-310

1977 Western Journal of Medicine

102. Involving consumers and survivors in mental health policy making

and experiences in decision making and caring processes? Conflicts of interest None declared. Links Primary paper Lancaster, K., Seear, K., Treloar, C., & Ritter, A. (2017). The productive techniques and constitutive effects of ‘evidence-based policy’ and ‘consumer participation’ discourses in health policy processes. Social Science & Medicine , 176 , 60-68. [ ] Other references Slade, M., & Longden, E. (2015). . BMC psychiatry , 15 (1), 285. Photo credits Photo by on Photo by on Photo by on Photo by on Share (...) Involving consumers and survivors in mental health policy making Involving consumers and survivors in mental health policy making Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Involving consumers and survivors in mental health policy making Mar 25 2019 Posted by Involving psychiatric survivors and others with lived experience of mental distress in the development of mental health care policy is clearly a positive step; representing, perhaps, a democratisation of decision

2019 The Mental Elf

103. Joanna M Zakrzewska and Mark E Linskey: Trigeminal neuralgia—gaps in the evidence

Joanna M Zakrzewska and Mark E Linskey: Trigeminal neuralgia—gaps in the evidence Joanna M Zakrzewska and Mark E Linskey: Trigeminal neuralgia—gaps in the evidence - The BMJ ---> This blog is part of a series of blogs linked with , a database of systematic overviews of the best available evidence on the effectiveness of commonly used interventions. Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare condition that causes excruciating intermittent short-lasting, usually unilateral facial pain especially provoked (...) , there are no biomarkers but magnetic resonance imaging with and without contrast of the brain is providing more data to help with decision making. Management is further complicated in that both drug and surgical options are available. The disease can suddenly become extremely acute with longer lasting bouts of pain, and there are no studies on how these should be managed. In emergency circumstances, patients are often given opioids which provide little, if any, pain relief. The most effective drugs for this condition

2015 The BMJ Blog

104. Withdrawal of, and alternatives to, valproate-containing medicines in girls and women of childbearing potential who have a psychiatric illness

of valproate-containing medicines, other than risks associated with pregnancy, including hepatotoxicity (family history of liver disease represents a contra- indication), hair loss and thrombocytopenia, and these and other potential problems also need to be considered and discussed with patients when making treatment decisions. 3. Switching patients from valproate-containing preparations to alternative medicines Psychiatrists should consider the possibility of a potential pregnancy when assessing (...) of sodium valproate for bipolar disorder in women of childbearing age. BMJ Open, 8 (4), e020450. Royal College of Psychiatrists – Psychopharmacology Committee (2017). College Report 210, Use of licensed medicines for unlicensed applications in psychiatric practice,. London. Siskind, D.J., Lee, M., Ravindran, A., Zhang, Q., Ma, E., Motamarri, B. and Kisely, S. (2018). Augmentation strategies for clozapine refractory schiz- ophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Australian and New Zealand

2019 British Association for Psychopharmacology

105. Prescribing patterns of dependence forming medicines

Prescribing patterns of dependence forming medicines Prescribing Patterns in Dependence Forming Medicines Javiera Cartagena Farias, Lauren Porter, Sally McManus, John Strang, Matthew Hickman, Kylie Reed, Neil Smith Cartagena Farias J, Porter L, McManus S, Strang J, Hickman M, Reed K, Smith N. (2017) Prescribing patterns in dependence forming medicines. London: NatCen. This is independent research commissioned and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Policy Research (...) included in the analysis see Appendix 30. GABAergic medicines are approved for the treatment of a range of conditions including epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, generalised anxiety disorder and restless drug syndrome. Off-label uses include migraine, social phobia, panic disorder, mania, bipolar disorder and alcohol withdrawal. GMS General Medical Services GP General Practitioner GPRD General Practice Research Database HES Hospital Period Statistics HSCIC Health and Social Care Information

2017 Public Health Research Consortium

106. Choices about first trimester ultrasound scans: A decision aid for pregnant women

Choices about first trimester ultrasound scans: A decision aid for pregnant women Choices about first trimester ultrasound scans: A decision aid for pregnant womenThis decision aid has been written to support pregnant women to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about first trimester ultrasound scans. An ultrasound scan is when a small handheld device is used to create a picture of a woman’s uterus (womb) and baby during pregnancy. A first trimester ultrasound scan (...) ultrasound scan. » What happens if I choose to have a first trimester ultrasound scan. » Will I always be able to choose? » How might I choose between not having and having a first trimester ultrasound scan? » What are the differences between not having and having a first trimester ultrasound scan? » How can I make the decision that’s best for me? » How can I ask questions to get more information? Women may also be offered an ultrasound scan at other times in pregnancy. This decision aid provides

2015 EUnetHTA

107. Choosing your model of care: A decision aid for pregnant women choosing their maternity care provider

to complete this work for the Queensland Centre for Mothers & Babies. The Centre is an independent research centre based at The University of Queensland and funded by the Queensland Government. The Centre does not stand to gain or lose anything by the choices you make after reading this decision aid. This decision aid has been developed to be consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards criteria for quality decision aids wherever possible. This decision aid is not meant to give you medical (...) Choosing your model of care: A decision aid for pregnant women choosing their maternity care provider Choosing your model of care A decision aid for pregnant women choosing their maternity care providerThis decision aid has been written to support women to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about their care during pregnancy, labour, birth and after birth. This decision aid provides information about four options: 1. Shared care 2. Public midwifery models of care 3

2015 EUnetHTA

108. Choices about clamping your baby?s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

aid is not meant to give you medical advice or recommend a course of treatment and you should not rely on it to provide you with a recommended course of treatment. It is not intended and should not be used to replace the advice or care provided by your midwife, your doctor and/or your obstetrician. You should consult and discuss your treatment options with your midwife, your doctor and/ or your obstetrician before making any treatment decisions. The University of Queensland, its employees (...) Choices about clamping your baby?s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choices about clamping your baby’s umbilical cord: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women having an actively managed third stage of labour to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about clamping their baby’s umbilical cord. An actively managed third stage of labour is when a woman is given Syntocinon® to help her birth

2015 EUnetHTA

109. Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

for Mothers & Babies. The Centre is an independent research centre based at The University of Queensland and funded by Queensland Health. The Centre does not stand to gain or lose anything by the choices you make after reading this decision aid. This decision aid has been developed to be consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards criteria for quality decision aids whereever possible. This decision aid is not meant to give you medical advice or recommend a course of treatment and you (...) Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are wanting to have a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about using a bath or pool during labour. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Not using a bath or pool during labour 2 Using

2015 EUnetHTA

110. Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

by Queensland Health. The Centre does not stand to gain or lose anything by the choices you make after reading this decision aid. This decision aid has been developed to be consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards criteria for quality decision aids whereever possible. This decision aid is not meant to give you medical advice or recommend a course of treatment and you should not rely on it to provide you with a recommended course of treatment. It is not intended and should not be used (...) Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Birthing your placenta Choosing how to birth your placenta: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth. This decision aid has been written to support women who have a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about the third stage of labour. The third stage of labour (or just the third stage) is the time from when a woman births her baby to when she births her placenta

2015 EUnetHTA

111. Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

Centre for Mothers & Babies. The Centre is an independent research centre based at The University of Queensland and funded by Queensland Health. The Centre does not stand to gain or lose anything by the choices you make after reading this decision aid. This decision aid has been developed to be consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards criteria for quality decision aids whereever possible. This decision aid is not meant to give you medical advice or recommend a course of treatment (...) Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about positions in labour and birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Being upright 2 Lying down This decision aid will also answer

2015 EUnetHTA

112. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

- published online before print July 20, 2015 PMID: Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Systemic Therapy for Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline x Catherine Van Poznak , x Mark R. Somerfield , x Robert C. Bast , x Massimo Cristofanilli , x Matthew P. Goetz , x Ana M. Gonzalez-Angulo , x David G. Hicks , x Elizabeth G. Hill , x Minetta C. Liu , x Wanda Lucas , x Ingrid A. Mayer , x Robert G. Mennel , x William F. Symmans , x Daniel F (...) : informal consensus. Evidence quality: insufficient. Strength of recommendation: moderate.) ASCO believes that cancer clinical trials are vital to inform medical decisions and improve cancer care and that all patients should have the opportunity to participate. Many reviews and commentaries have discussed the nature of evidence required to support conclusions that using biomarker assay results to guide or influence treatment decisions improves health outcomes for patients with a malignancy. – Although

2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

113. Reduction of polypharmacy by electronic decision support—less is more

in evidence-based medicine, clinical decision support, general practice and pharmacotherapy—set out to develop the “PRIMA-eDS tool” (Polypharmacy: Reduction of Inappropriate Medication and Adverse drug events in an older population by electronic Decision Support), a comprehensive electronic decision support tool to support GPs in treating their older patients with polypharmacy. The PRIMA-eDS tool consists of two parts: a data entry form to fill in up-to-date patient data and a comprehensive medication (...) review to support physicians and patients in reducing potentially inappropriate and non-evidence-based polypharmacy in a shared decision-making process. This kind of medication review is a novel approach to assessing a patient’s medication: it is not limited to any specific drug or drug classes, but rather uses an all-inclusive approach based on best available evidence derived from systematic reviews that our group undertook and national guidelines. [1-7] It also included information on a number

2020 The BMJ Blog

114. Randomized controlled trial on the effect of an online decision aid for young female cancer patients regarding fertility preservation. (Abstract)

Randomized controlled trial on the effect of an online decision aid for young female cancer patients regarding fertility preservation. Does the use of an online decision aid (DA) about fertility preservation (FP), in addition to standard counselling by a specialist in reproductive medicine, reduce decisional conflict compared to standard counselling alone?Female cancer patients who could make use of the online DA had a significantly lower short-term decisional conflict score.Nowadays, female (...) ; M = 9.35, SD = 4.48; 95% CI, 0.31-18.38). At T3, the mean total score of the DCS was still lower in the intervention group compared to the control group; however, this group difference was no longer significant (P = 0.199, M = 6.86, SD = 5.24; 95% CI, -3.78 to 17.51). The majority of participants had already made a decision regarding FP (yes or no) at T1 (72.5%): 91.7% in the intervention group compared to 55.6% in the control group (P = 0.014). Those who had decided already at T1 showed

2019 Human Reproduction Controlled trial quality: predicted high

115. Medical Tourism

facilities and medical evacuation to their home country may need to be considered, including adequate insurance to cover such possibilities. ADVICE FOR MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS Medical practitioners should inform prospective patients seeking medical interventions outside Australia and New Zealand of the potential difficulties they may encounter in order to ensure that patients are able to make informed decisions as to the advisability of such a course of action. Approved by: Professional Development (...) . Australian Government - Department of Human Services (DHS) 2016 ‘Reciprocal Health Care Agreements’ . Gaines, J & Nguyen, DB 2016, ‘Medical Tourism’, Yellow Book, CDC health information for international travel 2016 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, USA), . Holliday, R, Bell, D, Jones, M, Probyn, E, & Sanchez Taylor, J 2014, ‘Sun, Sea, Sand and Silicone: Mapping Cosmetic Surgery Tourism’, Economic & Social Research Council-University of Leeds, . Leggat, P 2015, ‘Medical Tourism

2017 Publication 80

116. Management of Suspected Opioid Overdose with Naloxone by Emergency Medical Services Personnel

Management of Suspected Opioid Overdose with Naloxone by Emergency Medical Services Personnel Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 193 Management of Suspected Opioid Overdose with Naloxone by Emergency Medical Services Personnel e Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 193 Management of Suspected Opioid Overdose With Naloxone by Emergency Medical Services Personnel Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane (...) affiliations or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report. The information in this report is intended to help health care decisionmakers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well-informed decisions and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of clinical judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should

2017 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

117. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Full Text available with Trip Pro

to the ICU and back. | Future Direction. Future studies must clarify the evidence to inform stepwise decision making in the EN algorithms. These steps include selection of gastric versus postpyloric tube feeding, clear and practical definitions of feeding intolerance (e.g., reflux, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, and malabsorption), and the role of adjuncts such as prokinetic, antiemetic, antidiarrheal, acid suppressive, and laxative medications. In particular, the practice of measuring GRV as a marker (...) Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Sup... : Pediatric Critical Care Medicine 1 mo and < 18 yr) critically ill patient expected to require a length of stay greater than 2 or 3 days in a PICU admitting medical, surgical, and cardiac patients. In total, 2,032 citations were

2017 Society of Critical Care Medicine

118. Safe Medication Use in the ICU Full Text available with Trip Pro

Practice Guideline: Safe Medication Use in the ICU Email to a Colleague Colleague's E-mail is Invalid Your Name: (optional) Your Email: Colleague's Email: Separate multiple e-mails with a (;). Message: Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Critical Care Medicine. Send a copy to your email Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Article Tools Share this article on: Email to a Colleague (...) Safe Medication Use in the ICU Clinical Practice Guideline: Safe Medication Use in the ICU : Critical Care Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account Registered users can save articles, searches, and manage email alerts. All

2017 Society of Critical Care Medicine

119. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Pharmacologic Treatment of Chronic Insomnia in Adults: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline

, PhD 1 ; Denis Martinez, MD, PhD 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Martina M. Pedroso, MSc 1 ; Camila G. Righi, PhD 1 ; Emerson F. Martins, PhD 1 ; Leticia M.T. Silva, MD 4 ; Maria do Carmo S. Lenz, MD, PhD 3 ; Cintia Z. Fiori, PhD 1 .205-213 Jack D. Edinger, PhD 1 , 2 ; Rachel Manber, PhD 3 ; Daniel J. Buysse, MD 4 ; Andrew D. Krystal, MD 2 ; Michael E. Thase, MD 5 ; Phillip Gehrman, PhD 5 ; Christopher P. Fairholme, PhD 6 ; James Luther, MA 7 ; Stephen Wisniewski, PhD 7 .215-221 Fabiana Yagihara, MSc 1 ; Geraldo (...) receive CBT-I as the initial treatment intervention. This is a strong recommendation based on moderate quality evidence. The second is that a shared decision-making approach be employed by clinicians in determining whether pharmacotherapy should be employed for those patients who did not achieve adequate response with CBT-I (weak recommendation based on low quality evidence). The guideline notes that there was insufficient evidence to draw conclusions regarding the overall efficacy of pharmacotherapy

2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

120. American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty

on low- or moderate-quality evidence. Conclusion. This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheu- matic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations re?ect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data. INTRODUCTION Although the wide utilization of disease-modifying antirheu- matic drugs (DMARDs) and biologic agents has improved the quality of life for patients with rheumatoid (...) , WebMD, and UBM LLC (less than $10,000 each), research grants from Takeda andSavientandwasprincipalinvestigatorforaninvestigator- initiated study funded by Horizon through a grant to Dinora (morethan$10,000). Address correspondence to Susan M. Goodman, MD, Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021. E-mail: goodmans@hss.edu. Submitted for publication September 26, 2016; accepted in revised form April 28, 2017. 1112 Goodman et al?are when the medications

2017 American College of Rheumatology

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>