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E/M Examination Criteria

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121. Choosing Wisely Canada recommendation - Don’t routinely do screening mammography for average risk women aged 40 – 49. Individual assessment of each woman’s preferences and risk should guide the discussion and decision regarding mammography screening in th

the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Don’t do annual physical exams on asymptomatic adults with no significant risk factors. A periodic physical examination has tremendous benefits; it allows physicians to check on their healthy patients while they remain healthy. However, the benefits of this check-up being done on an annual basis are questionable since many chronic illnesses that benefit from early detection take longer than a year to develop. Preventive health checks should instead be done (...) at time intervals recommended by guidelines, such as those noted by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Don’t order DEXA (Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry) screening for osteoporosis on low risk patients. While all patients aged 50 years and older should be evaluated for risk factors for osteoporosis using tools such as the osteoporosis self-assessment screening tool (OST), bone mineral density screening via DEXA is not warranted on women under 65 or men under 70 at low risk

2019 CPG Infobase

122. Managing opioid use disorder in primary care: PEER simplified guideline

CFPlus.* Correspondence Dr Christina Korownyk; e-mail cpoag@ualberta.ca References 1. Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses. National report: apparent opioid-related deaths in Canada (January 2016 to March 2018). Ottawa, ON: Public Health Agency of Canada; 2018. 2. Gomes T, Khuu W, Martins D, Tadrous M, Mamdani MM, Paterson JM, et al. Contributions of pre- scribed and non-prescribed opioids to opioid related deaths: population based cohort study in Ontario, Canada. BMJ (...) edition, criteria; however, the definition has changed over time. Given this inconsistent definition and differing study designs, a reasonable estimate of OUD risk after initial opioid prescription might be 4.7%, recognizing that stud- ies range broadly from 0% to 34%. 7-14 In response to the number of Canadians with OUD and the number of opioid- related deaths, the federal government launched a Canadian drugs and substances strategy. 15,16 In line with this strategy, national methadone prescribing

2019 CPG Infobase

123. Canadian guideline for Parkinson disease

. Copyright © 2019 Joule Inc. or its licensors 16 DIAGNOSIS AND PROGRESSION (M. Schlossmacher & E. Fon) Parkinson disease is characterized by a constellation of clinical manifestations, which include slowness of movement (brady- kinesia), rest tremor, rigidity and postural instability. Parkinson disease is a complex disorder that can be dicult to diagnose clinically, especially in the early stages when only some of its cardinal signs may be present. A diagnosis based on its etiology is impractical because (...) FOR PARKINSON DISEASE, 2ND ED PARKINSON DISEASE Parkinson-visual-9.pdf 1 2019-08-27 9:06 AM Parkinson-final-E.indd 4 2019-09-05 2:39 PMAppendix to: Grimes D, Fitzpatrick M, Gordon J, et al. Canadian guideline for Parkinson disease. CMAJ 2019. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.181504. Copyright © 2019 Joule Inc. or its licensors 5 COMMUNICATION n People with Parkinson disease should be encouraged to participate in choices about their own care. n Communication should be in verbal and written form. n Discussions should aim

2019 CPG Infobase

124. Guidelines for diagnosing and managing pediatric concussion

who play high-risk sports in case they sustain a concussion. • To assist with return-to-play decisions. Level of evidence: B. 2.1: Assess and treat any physical, cognitive and neurological deficits. When: On presentation. Who: Health care professionals. • Example: Emergency Department physicians, family physicians, pediatricians, sport medicine physician, nurse-practitioners. How: • Take a history; do an examination and a cognitive screen, assess for persistent symptoms; review mental health. Use (...) -system injuries (use clinical judgment); o comorbid symptoms (use clinical judgment). • Recommendation 3.1: Provide verbal information and written handouts to the child/adolescent and the parents and/or caregivers. Chapter: Recommendations Guidelines for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion 9 Tipsheet / List of Tools Why: Patients who meet these criteria can be discharged safely. Level of evidence: B. 3.1: Provide verbal information and written handouts to the child/adolescent and the parents

2019 CPG Infobase

125. Negative pressure wound therapy for wounds healing by secondary intention

intention Commissioning agency: Federal Joint Committee Commission awarded on: 27 April 2017 Internal Commission No.: N17-01A Address of publisher: Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen Im Mediapark 8 50670 Köln Germany Phone: +49 221 35685-0 Fax: +49 221 35685-1 E-mail: berichte@iqwig.de Internet: www.iqwig.de Extract of final report N17-01A Version 1.1 Negative pressure wound therapy – wounds healing by secondary intention 25 June 2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency (...) The information retrieval identified 62 randomized controlled trials (119 documents) as relevant for the research question of this benefit assessment on NPWT in patients with wounds healing by secondary intention. Nine studies were only formally included because they fulfilled all inclusion criteria but failed to supply usable data on any outcome. Five additional studies reported usable data only on outcomes presented for supplementary information. For transparency purposes, these 14 studies were included

2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

126. Negative pressure wound therapy for wounds healing by primary intention

Commissioning agency: Federal Joint Committee Commission awarded on: 27 April 2017 Internal Commission No.: N17-01B Address of publisher: Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen Im Mediapark 8 50670 Köln Germany Phone: +49 221 35685-0 Fax: +49 221 35685-1 E-mail: berichte@iqwig.de Internet: www.iqwig.de Extract of final report N17-01B Version 1.0 Negative pressure wound therapy – wounds healing by primary intention 12 June 2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (...) for bibliographic databases and trial registries are found in the appendix. The most recent search was conducted on 8 February 2019. Studies to be considered for N17-01B The information retrieval identified 54 randomized controlled trials (135 documents) as being relevant for the research question of this benefit assessment on NPWT in patients with wounds healing by primary intention. Six studies were included only formally because they fulfilled all inclusion criteria, but failed to supply usable data on any

2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

127. Benefit assessment of biotechnologically produced drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

of publisher: Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen Im Mediapark 8 50670 Köln Germany Phone: +49 221 35685-0 Fax: +49 221 35685-1 E-mail: berichte@iqwig.de Internet: www.iqwig.de Extract of final report A16-70 Version 1.0 Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis 23 July 2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - ii - This report was prepared in collaboration with external experts. The responsibility for the contents of the report lies solely with IQWiG (...) components: number of painful joints, number of swollen joints, global assessment of disease activity by the patient, and global assessment of disease activity by the physician [16] ? Definition where all criteria must be met (designated as Boolean definition): = 1 painful joint, = 1 swollen joint, CRP = 1 mg/dl, and global assessment of disease activity by the patient = 1 on a scale of 0 to 10 Extract of final report A16-70 Version 1.0 Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis 23 July 2019 Institute

2019 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

128. Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health

the local effect on air pollutant emissions to demonstrate the benefits of training on fuel use and air quality. Procuring public sector v Procuring public sector vehicles ehicles 1.4.6 Consider making low vehicle emissions (nitrogen oxides and particles) one of the criteria when making routine procurement decisions. This could include selecting low-emission vehicles, including electric vehicles. See how the committee made recommendations 1.4.1 to 1.4.6. Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health (...) is usually expressed in micrograms per m 3 of air. [2] The UK is divided into 43 zones for assessing air quality and reporting compliance with EU targets. These zones generally include more than 1 local authority (Air quality plan for the achievement of EU air quality limit values for nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in the UK, 2015 Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.) Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health (NG70) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

129. Cystic fibrosis: diagnosis and management

, for guidance on joint responsibility and working together with other organisations. 1.4 Complications of cystic fibrosis 1.4.1 Be aware that people with cystic fibrosis are at risk of the following common complications: being underweight meconium ileus (affects 1 in 7 newborn babies) fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies (including vitamins A, D, E and K) distal intestinal obstruction syndrome muscle pains and arthralgia Cystic fibrosis: diagnosis and management (NG78) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject (...) of clinical history and medicines adherence, and a physical examination with measurement of weight and length or height Cystic fibrosis: diagnosis and management (NG78) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 15 of 43measurement of oxygen saturation taking respiratory secretion samples for microbiological investigations, using sputum samples if possible, or a cough swab or nasal pharyngeal aspirate (NPA) lung

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

130. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia

, or royalties) that conflict with material presented in the report. Evidence Brief: TBI and Dementia Evidence Synthesis Program i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 Key Findings 1 Evidence Brief 4 Introduction 4 Purpose 4 Background 4 Scope 6 Key questions 6 Eligibility criteria 6 Methods 8 Results 9 Literature Flow 9 Literature Overview 9 Key Question 1: What is the comparative prevalence of dementia between Veterans and the civilian population? 10 KQ1a: Does the prevalence of dementia in Veterans vary (...) studies. Regarding unmeasured confounding of the association between dementia and TBI, many demographic, medical, psychiatric, genetic, and lifestyle risk factors have been reported, including, age, sex, Apolipoprotein E polymorphisms, alcohol use, smoking, prescription opioid misuse, diabetes, hypertension, and others. 9-11 These factors may have an impact on the development of dementia and may vary between TBI and non-TBI groups within studies. Additionally, TBI, dementia, and other mental health

2019 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

131. Best practice for managing outpatient bookings

weeks or months in advance, rather each day starts with a sizable share of the day’s appointments left open, and the remainder booked for those who elected not to come to the office on the day they called. 5 Length of in person visits Using fewer and longer in-person visits and designated patient outreach, Group Health teams were able to integrate e-mail messages, telephone visits, and proactive care activities into their everyday work flow with a significant decrease in provider burnout. 5 Schedule (...) it is in the best clinical interests of the patient or part of the clinical pathway for which the patient is being treated. The Alfred, Australia 4 The Alfred have developed a GP electronic referral system and education program. The e-referral system covers 3 types of referral (generic referral, speciality unit referral and condition specific referral) was trialled in 5 GP practices. The referral processing time went from 7 days to 1 day with no rejected referrals (18% prior). Referral time to triage down

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

132. IV night teams: Impact on Infection rates, insertion success and deskilling

Epidemiol. 2013 Sep;34(9):908-18. 25. Golombek SG, Rohan AJ, Parvez B, et al. Proactive" management of percutaneously inserted central catheters results in decreased incidence of infection in the ELBW population. J Perinatol. 2002 Apr- May;22(3):209-13. 26. Brown, P. (1984). An IV specialty team can mean savings for hospital and patient. NITA, 7, 387-388. 27. McDiarmid S, Scrivens N, Carrier M, Sabri E, Toye B, Huebsch L, Fergusson D. Outcomes in a nurse- led peripherally inserted central catheter (...) Rickard and Dr Peter Carr were consulted about your questions and they indicated that they were not aware of any research on the effectiveness of IV night teams. Scientific and grey literature databases were searched to find both synthesised and primary evidence on IV night teams, infection rates and deskilling. Articles were screened and selected according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria in Table A1 (appendix). Only articles published in English were considered. A summary of findings are included

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

133. Informing best practice in writing discharge summaries

associated with a discharge summary. There is currently no standardised template for a discharge summary used within Monash Health. Well-defined criteria for the quality of a discharge summary is lacking [1] . However, reviews of literature agree that good quality discharge summaries should avoid error, efficiently communicate information necessary for the ongoing care of a patient, and increase the quality of care of a patient [1-2] . Time pressure in hospitals, outpatient clinics and GP practices does (...) components of a discharge summary as described by literature; these include recommendations on the content, format, style and processing of a discharge summary. Components that are not frequently used in discharge summaries should also be considered where relevant to a patient’s ongoing care. More importantly, clinicians should always ensure that components in the discharge summary are filled up adequately and correctly. References 1. Unnewehr M., Schaaf, B., Marev, R., Fitch J. & Friederichs H. (2015

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

134. Clinical Aggression Training: A Rapid Review

identified were screened using inclusion and exclusion criteria established a priori. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied in two stages: 1) Only articles that are systematic reviews, involving human studies, and published in the last 5 years were included; 2) Only reviews that specifically meet the population, intervention, outcome and context (Table 2 in Appendix). Screening and inclusion was conducted by one author (CJ), in consultation with colleagues as necessary, using inclusion (...) and exclusion criteria established a priori (Table 2). Results A total of 142 studies were found following initial searching of databases. Two reviewers (CJ & HM) applied the inclusion/exclusion criteria. As a result, 8 studies 1-8 and 5 sources of grey literature 9-13 were included in this review. The settings covered in the included studies were: nursing, 1,3 mental health, 4,5 emergency department, 6,7 healthcare workers. 2,8-13 Of the included resources, three were from Australian healthcare services

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

135. Biodegradable Rectal Spacers for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

as examination of factors that may help to select those individuals that are at higher risk of toxicity. Until such data are available, in our expert opinion, it may be prudent to use this technology in selected patients that might include the following: those in whom standard rectal dose-volume criteria are not met; those treated with ultrahypofractionated RT; and those at higher baseline risk of rectal toxicity. Our findings are consistent with that of the NICE document, which states that ?current evidence (...) injection reduces rectal toxicity after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Strahlenther Onkol. 2017;193(1):22-8. 4. Prada PJ, Gonzalez H, Menéndez C, Llaneza A, Fernández J, Santamarta E, et al. Transperineal injection of hyaluronic acid in the anterior perirectal fat to decrease rectal toxicity from radiation delivered with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer patients. Brachytherapy. 2009;8(2):210-7. 5. Te Velde BL, Westhuyzen J, Awad N, Wood M, Shakespeare TP. Can a peri-rectal

2019 Cancer Care Ontario

136. Community-based mental health and wellbeing support for refugees

) • Systematic reviews (n=5) • Peer-reviewed articles (n=29) • Grey literature (n=7) Identified grey literature (n=66) Grey literature included (n=7) COMMUNITY-BASED MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING SUPPORT FOR REFUGEES | SAX INSTITUTE 15 Systematic reviews We retrieved 49 systematic reviews undertaken between 2010 and 2018, some reporting on studies as far back as 1980. Forty-four of the systematic reviews examined studies that fell outside of our criteria and were therefore excluded. The remaining five (...) 91889500 Suggested Citation: Slewa-Younan S, Blignault I, Renzaho A, Doherty M. Community-based mental health and wellbeing support for refugees: an Evidence Check rapid review brokered by the Sax Institute (www.saxinstitute.org.au) for the NSW Ministry of Health, 2018. Disclaimer: This Evidence Check Review was produced using the Evidence Check methodology in response to specific questions from the commissioning agency. It is not necessarily a comprehensive review of all literature relating

2019 Sax Institute Evidence Check

137. Public health guidance on prevention and control of blood-borne viruses in prison settings

of bias, following Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria (‘grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation’). Since significant heterogeneity existed between the included studies, the strength of evidence was not assessed beyond individual studies. Grey literature documents were included only if they used transparent methods for collecting and compiling data and/or provided data sources/references. Relevant conference abstracts/unpublished (...) research reports were checked for duplicity with peer-reviewed literature. Relevant guidelines were critically appraised with a selection of criteria derived from the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument (‘appraisal of guidelines for research and evaluation’) and were categorised as either evidence-based guidelines or practice- based guidelines (with the former considered as higher quality; see Glossary). To structure the evidence, the evidence base from the systematic

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

138. Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA

advisory group that was established to support the development of this guidance. The advisory group included the ad hoc scientific panel as well as experts and observers as follows: Karin Taus (Austria) Cliona M Cheallaigh (Ireland), Núria Serre Delcor (Spain), Sally Hargreaves (United Kingdom), Hilary Kirkbride (United Kingdom), Alison Crawshaw (United Kingdom), Isabel De La Mata (European Commission), Ludovica Banfi (European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights), Olga Gorbacheva and Jenna Iodice (...) Figure 8. Distribution of measles cases by country, EU/EEA, 1 January–31 December 2017 46 Figure 9. Measles vaccination coverage by country, EU/EEA countries, 2017 47 Tables Table 1. Eligibility criteria used for all diseases 10 Table 2. Interpretation of GRADE certainty of evidence 11 Table 3. Interpretation of GRADE strength of recommendation 12 Table 4. Constructs of the FACE survey 12 Table 5. Evidence synthesis and guidance for active TB screening in migrants 17 Table 6. Active TB screening

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

139. Programmatic management of latent tuberculosis infection in the European Union

. The results of the systematic reviews were extracted and used in the review of reviews report [5]. Contact Someone who has been exposed to M. tuberculosis infection by sharing air space with a person with infectious tuberculosis, the so-called source case, with the probability of being infected increasing with the duration and closeness of contact, as well as the infectiousness of the source case and susceptibility of the contact [6]. Household contacts Those who live in the same household (...) as the tuberculosis case. Household contacts are considered, by definition, to share breathing space on a daily basis with the source case [7]. Close contacts This group includes: • those persons with short exposure times to direct face-to-face streams of air with a particularly high density of infectious droplet nuclei, such as may occur during bronchoscopy or otorhinolaryngeal examination of patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis; • those with an arbitrarily defined cumulative exposure time of eight

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

140. Public health guidance on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA

population in relation to effect of intervention. Accessibility. Degree to which given intervention is accessible to target population (availability of good health services within reasonable reach and when needed). Audit: Quality improvement process that aims to improve care of patients by reviewing practices against criteria such as existing policy or guidelines and modifying practices where necessary. Campaign: Series of activities and efforts to increase awareness and/or to promote initiatives (...) users to send emails, e-cards or text messages to inform partners anonymously. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP): Use of antiretroviral therapy following exposure to HIV infection to try to prevent establishment of infection. Prevalence: Prevalence measures proportion of individuals in defined population with specific disease (or specific characteristic) at certain point in time. High, intermediate and low prevalence rates may be defined for HCV, HBV and HIV to guide testing strategies after taking

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

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