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Dysuria in Children

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61. Articles of the month Special Edition: Pediatric UTI

for diagnosis and management of UTI give us these reasons for treating pediatric UTI: UTI can cause acute renal injury Kidney damage increases with delay in diagnosis and recurrent disease Diagnosis allows us to detect obstructive abnormalities or severe reflux UTI can cause hypertension and ESRD later in life Robinson JL, Finlay JC, Lang ME, Bortolussi R, . Urinary tract infections in infants and children: Diagnosis and management. Paediatrics & child health. 19(6):315-25. 2014. PMID: [ ] The CPS (Canadian (...) , despite their lack of symptoms. Ralston S, Hill V, Waters A. Occult serious bacterial infection in infants younger than 60 to 90 days with bronchiolitis: a systematic review. Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine. 165(10):951-6. 2011. PMID: I frequently hear that kids with obvious clinical bronchiolitis have a high rate of serious bacterial illness (meaning UTI). Indeed, if you culture children with bronchiolitis, you will often find bacteria in the urine. I won’t go through all the individual

2016 First10EM

62. The SCOUT Study: Short Course Therapy for Urinary Tract Infections in Children

two months (at least 36 weeks gestation from birth for subjects < two years of age) to 10 years with a confirmed diagnosis of a urinary tract infection (UTI) to evaluate 672 for the study's primary outcome measure. UTI is one of the most common serious bacterial infections during childhood. Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolates account for 80-90 percent of all outpatient UTIs in children. Although antibiotics are the first treatment choice for urinary tract infections, antibiotic-resistant strains (...) temperature > / = 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius (measured anywhere on the body) 24 hours prior to the enrollment visit Asymptomatic: report NONE of the following symptoms: Symptoms for all children (ages two months to 10 years): Fever (a documented temperature of at least 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit OR 38 degrees Celsius measured anywhere on the body) dysuria Additional symptoms for children > 2 years of age: suprapubic, abdominal, or flank pain or tenderness OR urinary urgency, frequency

2012 Clinical Trials

63. Group Versus Individual Urotherapy for Children

group urotherapy in small groups with other children. Active Comparator: Individual urotherapy Children will receive standard individual urotherapy in regular pediatric urology clinic. Behavioral: Individual Urotherapy Children will receive standard individual urotherapy in regular pediatric urology clinic. Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : lower urinary tract symptoms [ Time Frame: 3 months ] incontinence, urgency, frequency, dysuria, hesitancy, straining and constipation Secondary (...) to Brief Summary: What are we doing? A pilot research study is planned to take place within the Pediatric Urology program at McMaster Children's hospital starting this spring/summer 2012. The pilot study will compare standard individual teaching that occurs in pediatric urology clinic about bladder re-training and achieving healthy bladder and bowel habits to a group teaching session. The group teaching session will be one hour in length and include the same content taught in pediatric urology clinic

2012 Clinical Trials

64. Prevalence and predictors of urinary tract infection and severe malaria among febrile children attending Makongoro health centre in Mwanza city, North-Western Tanzania Full Text available with Trip Pro

total of 231 febrile under-fives were enrolled in the study. Of all the children, 20.3% (47/231, 95%CI, 15.10-25.48), 9.5% (22/231, 95%CI, 5.72-13.28) and 7.4% (17/231, 95%CI, 4.00-10.8) had urinary tract infections, P. falciparum malaria and bacteremia respectively. In general, 11.5% (10/87, 95%CI, 8.10-14.90) of the children had two infections and only one child had all three infections. Predictors of urinary tract infections (UTI) were dysuria (OR = 12.51, 95% CI, 4.28-36.57, P < 0.001) and body (...) Prevalence and predictors of urinary tract infection and severe malaria among febrile children attending Makongoro health centre in Mwanza city, North-Western Tanzania In malaria endemic areas, fever has been used as an entry point for presumptive treatment of malaria. At present, the decrease in malaria transmission in Africa implies an increase in febrile illnesses related to other causes among underfives. Moreover, it is estimated that more than half of the children presenting with fever

2012 Archives of Public Health

65. Use of Validated Bladder/Bowel Dysfunction Questionnaire in the Clinical Pediatric Urology Setting. (Abstract)

Use of Validated Bladder/Bowel Dysfunction Questionnaire in the Clinical Pediatric Urology Setting. Questionnaires to quantify pediatric bladder/bowel dysfunction have recently been developed as research instruments. We evaluated our use of a bladder/bowel dysfunction questionnaire in a busy clinical setting.We distributed a validated bladder/bowel dysfunction questionnaire to all new pediatric urology outpatients older than age 4 years from May 1 to July 31, 2010. We instructed families (...) to complete the questionnaire without assistance. Physicians were blinded to responses during the study period. We compared total scores between groups of patients with bladder/bowel dysfunction related and bladder/bowel dysfunction unrelated primary diagnoses. We also compared individual item scores pertaining to urinary incontinence, dysuria, nocturnal enuresis and constipation in patients with those specific primary ICD-9 diagnosis codes to those of other bladder/bowel dysfunction related diagnoses.Of

2012 Journal of Urology

66. Incidence and outcome of symptomatic urinary tract infection in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

of the stricter diagnostic criterion used in the study. Urinary pus cell counts were also carried out and sometimes found to be misleading. Of the 14 children found to have an infection, three had a radiological abnormality. Five of the children had a recurrence of infection within the first two years, and one an asymptomatic bacteriuria seven years after diagnosis. Only six out of 34 children presenting with dysuria had infected urine, and an association was discovered between abacterial dysuria (...) Incidence and outcome of symptomatic urinary tract infection in children. The incidence of symptomatic urinary tract infection in 2879 children aged under 15 years was studied over 18 months in a single general practice. Infection was diagnosed if bacterial counts in three consecutive samples exceeded 100,000/ml. The incidence of urinary tract infection was 1.7 per 1000 boys at risk per year and 3.1 per 1000 girls. These values are lower than those of comparable studies, possibly because

1979 British medical journal

67. An unusual cause of terminal hematuria in a child: Eosinophilic cystitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

An unusual cause of terminal hematuria in a child: Eosinophilic cystitis Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the bladder; it rarely occurs in children. Patients typically show irritative urination symptoms frequently, with a possible need for urgency, alongside dysuria, gross haematuria, suprapubic pain and painful urination. Sometimes bladder mass accumulation with the possibility of malignancy is also observed. We present an 8-year-old male patient who gained admission

2014 Canadian Urological Association Journal

68. Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children

Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children - Pediatrics - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test (...) vomiting is abnormal. The most common causes of vomiting in infants and neonates include the following: Acute viral disease Other important causes in infants and neonates include the following: Intestinal obstruction (eg, , volvulus, intestinal atresia, stenosis) (typically in infants aged 3 to 36 mo) Less common causes of recurrent vomiting include and food intolerance. (eg, , organic acidemias) are uncommon but can manifest with vomiting. Older children The most common cause is Acute viral Non-GI

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

69. Suspected cancer: recognition and referral

, safety netting and the diagnostic process. Then, for those wanting to find recommendations on specific symptoms and primary care investigations, the recommendations are in a section organised by symptoms and investigation findings. Safeguarding children Safeguarding children Remember that child maltreatment: • is common • can present anywhere • may co-exist with other health problems, including suspected cancer. See NICE's guideline on child maltreatment for clinical features that may be associated (...) sarcoma or if ultrasound findings are uncertain and clinical concern persists. [2015] [2015] 1.12 1.12 Childhood cancers Childhood cancers Neuroblastoma Neuroblastoma 1.12.1 Consider very urgent referral (for an appointment within 48 hours) for specialist assessment for neuroblastoma in children with a palpable abdominal mass or unexplained enlarged abdominal organ. [2015] [2015] Suspected cancer: recognition and referral (NG12) © NICE 2020. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2020 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

70. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Children

Diabetes Trauma In females, sexual intercourse Urinary tract abnormalities in children Urinary tract infections in children are a marker of possible urinary tract abnormalities (eg, obstruction, neurogenic bladder, ureteral duplication); these abnormalities are particularly likely to result in recurrent infection if (VUR) is present. About 20% to 30% of infants and children age 12 to 36 mo with UTI have VUR. The younger the child at the first UTI, the higher the likelihood of VUR. VUR is classified (...) , failure to thrive, vomiting, mild jaundice (which is usually direct bilirubin elevation), lethargy, fever, and hypothermia. may develop. Infants and children < 2=""> with UTI may also present with poorly localizing signs, such as fever, GI symptoms (eg, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain), or foul-smelling urine. About 4 to 10% of febrile infants without localizing signs have UTI. In children > 2 yr, the more classic picture of cystitis or pyelonephritis can occur. Symptoms of cystitis include dysuria

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

71. Urinary Incontinence In Children

Urinary Incontinence In Children Urinary Incontinence In Children - Pediatrics - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test your knowledge (...) ( ). (See also .) Podcast General references 1. Wright, AJ: The epidemiology of childhood incontinence. In Pediatric Incontinence, Evaluation and Clinical Management , edited by Franco I, Austin P, Bauer S, von Gontard A, Homsy I. Chichester, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2015, pp. 37–60. 2. Horowitz M, Misseri R: Diurnal and nocturnal enuresis. In Clinical Pediatric Urology , ed. 5, edited by Docimo S, Canning D, Khoury A. London, Martin Dunitz Ltd., 2007, pp. 819–840. 3. Austin PF, Vricella GJ: Functional

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

72. Renal and ureteric stones: assessment and management

with ureteric or renal stones. 1.7.3 Consider referring children and young people with ureteric or renal stones to a paediatric nephrologist or paediatric urologist with expertise in this area for assessment and metabolic investigations. Renal and ureteric stones: assessment and management (NG118) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 10 of 33T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on metabolic (...) . If a woman is pregnant, offer ultrasound instead of CT. 1.1.2 Offer urgent (within 24 hours of presentation) ultrasound as first-line imaging for children and young people with suspected renal colic. 1.1.3 If there is still uncertainty about the diagnosis of renal colic after ultrasound for children and young people, consider low-dose non-contrast CT. T o find out why the committee made the recommendations on diagnostic imaging and how they might affect practice, see rationale and impact. 1.2 Pain

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

73. Fever in under 5s: assessment and initial management

not routinely have a chest X-ray. [2007] [2007] 1.4.7 T est urine in children with fever as recommended in NICE's guideline on urinary tract infection in under 16s. [2007] [2007] 1.4.8 When a child has been given antipyretics, do not rely on a decrease or lack of decrease in temperature to differentiate between serious and non-serious illness. [2017] [2017] Use of antibiotics b Use of antibiotics by the non-paediatric pr y the non-paediatric practitioner actitioner 1.4.9 Do not prescribe oral antibiotics (...) 1.5.1 Management by the paediatric specialist should start with a clinical assessment as described in section 1.2. The healthcare professional should attempt to identify symptoms and signs of serious illness and specific diseases as summarised in tables 1 and 2. [2007] [2007] Children y Children younger than 3 ounger than 3 months months 1.5.2 Infants younger than 3 months with fever should be observed and have the following vital signs measured and recorded: temperature heart rate respiratory rate

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

74. Management of suspected bacterial lower urinary tract infection in adult women

population results differ from the per-protocol results as 28 patients did not enter the treatment phase following complete healing after antibiotic treatment.120 Probiotics Probiotics are live micro-organisms which are thought to confer a health benefit on the host. The hypothesis is that they work by preventing other harmful bacteria from colonising the urinary tract and causing infection. A meta-analysis of six studies that involved 352 women and children demonstrated no significant difference (...) included men, women and children, examined risk factors for CA-UTI. Infection rates increased with each additional day of catheterisation and patients who were female along with those with cerebrovascular disease or paraplegia were at higher risk of CA-UTI. This supports regular review of the need for a urinary catheter to minimise UTI in this population. ? Use a catheter passport to provide education for patients and families and to facilitate communication between hospital and community healthcare

2020 SIGN

75. Prostatitis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing

during a course of penicillin in childhood. Fewer than 10% of people who think they are allergic to penicillin are truly allergic. See the NICE guideline on drug allergy for more information. People with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to penicillins may also react to cephalosporins and other beta-lactam antibiotics (BNF, August 2018). Aminoglycoside doses are based on weight and renal function and whenever possible treatment should not exceed 7 days (BNF, August 2018). There are restrictions (...) for a further 14 days as needed based on clinical assessment. From experience, the committee discussed that whether to continue treatment or not would be based on the person's history or risk of developing chronic prostatitis, their current symptoms and any recent examination, urine and blood test results. Continued symptoms, such as fever or lower urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, frequency, urgency, or acute urinary retention) require ongoing treatment. Prostatitis (acute): antimicrobial prescribing (NG110

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

76. Prostate Cancer Part 1: Diagnosis and Referral in Primary Care

by approximately 50%. For accurate interpretation relative to lab-reported aged-based ranges, adjust the reported result by a factor of 2. PSA testing should be avoided if the patient has signs or symptoms of acute prostatitis (e.g., dysuria, hematuria, pelvic/groin pain, fever/chills). Antibiotics should not be used in an attempt to lower PSA as this practice may be detrimental. Epidemiology Prostate cancer usually develops slowly. Many men with prostate cancer will not have clinical progression (i.e (...) , siblings, children)). High-risk hereditary gene mutations associated with prostate cancer (e.g., BRCA2 genetic mutation in a first-degree relative). Refer to the BC Cancer Hereditary Cancer Program for more information about referral of men who suspect that they may have a hereditary gene mutation. While there is little direct evidence to guide screening practices in asymptomatic men with the above risk factors, there is general consensus that these men at higher risk may consider PSA testing as early

2020 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

77. The management of urinary incontinence in women

and the 25 NICE Guideline Development Group 4.1 Guideline Review and Contextualisation Group 25 4.2 NICE Guideline Development Group 25 4.3 NICE Guideline contextualisation quality assurance team 26 4.4 National Collaborating Centre for Women’s and Children’s Health 26 About this guideline 26 Update information 26 Recommendations from NICE CG171 that have been contextualised 27 Strength of recommendations 33 UK versions of this guideline 33 Implementation 34 Your responsibility 34 Copyright 34 An online (...) of the woman’s child-bearing wishes in the counselling. 1.8.2 Offer invasive therapy (beyond botulinum toxin type A) for OAB and/or recurrent post surgical and complex cases of SUI symptoms only after an MDT review. 1.8.3 When recommending optimal management the MDT should take into account: • the woman’s preference • past management • comorbidities • treatment options (including further conservative management such as OAB medicine therapy). 1.8.4 The MDT for urinary incontinence should include (if available

2019 Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand

78. United Kingdom BASHH national guideline for the management of epididymo-orchitis

in the diagnosis of acute scrotum in boys. Eur J Pediatr Surg 2000;10:235-41. 73. Cimador M, DiPace MR, Castagnetti M, DeGrazia E. Predictors of testicular viability in testicular torsion. Journal of Pediatric Urology (2007) 3, 387-390. 74. Kalfa, N, et al. Multicenter assessment of ultrasound of the spermatic cord in children with acute scrotum. J Urol, 2007. 177: 297 75. NICE guideline: Tuberculosis. Published: January 2016, Updated: September 2019. Available from: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng33 (Last (...) is a notifiable disease which should be considered as an aetiology since the epidemic in 2005 [27]. This epidemic mainly affected non-immunised adults born between 1982 and 1986. This complication of mumps (presenting with unilateral or bilateral orchitis) can occur in up to 40% of post-pubertal males [28-30]. • Other viral pathogens such as adenovirus and enterovirus have been reported in children, presumed to be a result of post viral inflammation of the epididymis. This is a self-limiting condition [31

2020 British Association for Sexual Health and HIV

79. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause

American Menopause Society Copyright @ 2020 The North American Menopause Society. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.900 women undergoing routine examinations, GSM was identified in 84% of women 6 years after menopause. 4 Principal symptoms included vaginal dryness, painful sex, burning, and dysuria. In contrast to vasomotor symptoms (VMS) that usually improve over time, GSM is generally progressive without effective therapy. Despite the high prev- alence of GSM and lack (...) Genitourinarysyndromeofmenopause describes the symp- toms and signs resulting from the effect of estrogen deficiency on the female genitourinary tract, including the vagina, labia, urethra, and bladder. 12 This syndrome includes genital symp- toms of dryness, burning, and irritation; urinary symptoms and conditions of dysuria, urgency, and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs); and sexual symptoms of pain and dryness. Physical changes and signs are varied. Women may experi- ence some or all of the symptoms and signs

2020 The North American Menopause Society

80. Balanitis: When should I suspect balanitis?

Balanitis: When should I suspect balanitis? Diagnosis | Diagnosis | Balanitis | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Diagnosis Balanitis: When should I suspect balanitis? Last revised in October 2018 When should I suspect balanitis? Suspect a diagnosis of balanitis if there are typical symptoms and signs: There may be a history of: Penile soreness and itch Bleeding from the foreskin and/or odour, which usually develops over a few days. Dysuria, difficulty passing urine, and/or dyspareunia (...) . On examination, there may be: Redness and swelling of the glans penis (and often the foreskin) with exudate. Tightening of the foreskin or meatal stenosis (may suggest ). An inability to retract the foreskin (phimosis). Basis for recommendation The recommendations on the diagnosis of balanitis are based on expert opinion in the 2013 European guideline for the management of balanoposthitis [ ], expert opinion in the British Association of Paediatric Urologists (BAPU) publication Management of foreskin

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

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