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Dysuria in Children

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62. British Association for Sexual Health and HIV national guideline for the management of vulvovaginal candidiasis

the various international terminology used for VVC but resulted in a large number of citations (1412). • The article titles and abstracts of all 1412 citations were reviewed for relevance. Citations clearly from animal studies, non-patient based studies, single case reports, studies in children, and those on subjects not relevant to the diagnosis or management of VVC were excluded on first review. • The titles and abstracts of the remaining citations (800) were reviewed by at least two members

2019 British Association for Sexual Health and HIV

63. Bladder Stones

were found in 89.5% and 49% of 57 children with endemic bladder stones in Pakistan, respectively [ ], whilst a low urinary pH and hypomagnesuria were associated with bladder stones in 57 men with chronic urinary retention secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) [ ]. 3.2. Diagnostic evaluation The symptoms most commonly associated with bladder stones are urinary frequency, haematuria (which is typically terminal) and dysuria or suprapubic pain, which is worst towards the end of micturition (...) guidelines. Eur Urol, 2015. 67: 750. 2. Türk, C., et al. EAU Guidelines on Diagnosis and Conservative Management of Urolithiasis. Eur Urol, 2016. 69: 468. 3. Turk, C., et al. EAU Guidelines on Interventional Treatment for Urolithiasis. Eur Urol, 2016. 69: 475. 4. Donaldson, J., et al. Interventions for Bladder stones in Adults and Children: A Systematic Review from the European Association of Urology Urolithiasis Guidelines Panel. 2019. 5. Guyatt, G.H., et al. GRADE: an emerging consensus on rating

2019 European Association of Urology

64. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

injury. The guideline did not address children and some adult populations, including patients with neutropenia, solid organ transplants, and nonurologic surgery. In the years since the publication of the guideline, further information relevant to ASB has become available. In addition, antimicrobial treatment of ASB has been recognized as an important contributor to inappropriate antimicrobial use, which promotes emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The current guideline updates the recommendations (...) Diseases Society of America (IDSA) published a guideline with recommenda- tions for the management of ASB in adults. The current guide- line reviews and updates the 2005 guideline, incorporating new evidence that has become available. The recommendations also consider populations not addressed in the 2005 guidelines, such as children and patients with solid organ transplants or neutro- penia. Since the previous guideline was published, antimicrobial stewardship programs have identified nontreatment

2019 Infectious Diseases Society of America

65. Urological Infections

. Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis. Int J Antimicrob Agents, 2009. 33: 111. 128. Bauer, H.W., et al. A long-term, multicenter, double-blind study of an Escherichia coli extract (OM-89) in female patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. Eur Urol, 2005. 47: 542. 129. Schwenger, E.M., et al. Probiotics for preventing urinary tract infections in adults and children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2015: CD008772. 130. Kontiokari, T., et al. Randomised trial

2019 European Association of Urology

68. Surveillance of healthcare-associated infections and prevention indicators in European intensive care units: HAI-Net ICU protocol, version 2.2

Surveillance of HAI and prevention indicators in European intensive care units 7 3.3 Pneumonia (PN 1 –PN 5) X-ray Two or more serial chest X-rays or CT-scans with a suggestive image of pneumonia for patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease* (in patients without underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease, one definitive chest X- ray or CT-scan is sufficient). Symptoms and at least one of the following: ? fever > 38 °C with no other cause ? leukopenia ( 38 °C), urgency, frequency, dysuria (...) , or suprapubic tenderness and ? Patient has a positive urine culture, i.e. = 10 5 microorganisms per ml of urine with no more than two species of microorganisms. 3.4.2 UTI-B: not microbiologically confirmed symptomatic UTI ? Patient has at least two of the following, with no other recognised cause: fever (> 38 °C), urgency, frequency, dysuria, or suprapubic tenderness; And at least one of the following: ? positive dipstick for leukocyte esterase and/or nitrate ? pyuria urine specimen with = 10 WBC/ml or = 3

2017 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Technical Guidance

69. Sexually Transmitted Infections

are present, as friction may delay healing. • Oral to genital transmission of HSV-1 is very common through oral sex. This can happen when ‘cold sores’ are not causing symptoms. • Genital herpes does not affect your fertility or stop you having children. Vaginal delivery is usual for most women with a history of genital herpes. • Genital herpes does not stop you having sex. • Anybody with genital herpes, whether they get symptoms or have never had symptoms, may shed the virus from time to time (...) status unknown and risk factors present e.g. Maori, Pasifika, areas of high endemicity, IDU or incarceration www.hepatitisfoundation.org.nz/ Symptomatic Examination is required for clinical assessment if symptomatic of vaginal discharge, dysuria, lower abdominal pain, abnormal bleeding, anal pain or discharge, or a contact of gonorrhoea: • Examine the inguinal nodes, vulval and perianal skin, vestibule and introitus. • Vulvovaginal NAAT swab for chlamydia & gonorrhoea testing prior to speculum

2017 New Zealand Sexual Health Society

70. British Association of Dermatologists' guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus

in the updated guidance for writing a British Association of Dermatologists clinical guideline – the adoption of the GRADE methodology 2016. The original accreditation term began on 12 May 2010. More information on accreditation can be viewed at www.nice.org.uk/accreditation. 1.0 Purpose and scope The overall objective of the guideline is to provide up-to-date, evidence-based recommendations for the management of lichen sclerosus (LS) in adults (= 18 years), children (0– 12 years) and young people (13–17 (...) ; most patients would not choose the intervention while only a small proportion would; for clinicians, most of their patients would not receive the intervention © 2018 British Association of Dermatologists British Journal of Dermatology (2018) 178, pp839–853 840 BAD guidelines for the management of lichen sclerosus, 2018, F.M. Lewis et al.All people (children, young people and adults; male and female) R1 (GPP) All people with LS should be managed by a health- care professional experienced in treating

2018 British Association of Dermatologists

71. Hematuria : Child

. o Summary of Literature Review Introduction/Background Hematuria is the presence of red blood cells in the urine, either visible to the eye (macroscopic hematuria) or as viewed under the microscope (microscopic hematuria). Detecting blood in the urine of a child may cause alarm to patients, parents, and physicians. The clinical evaluation of children with any form of hematuria begins with a meticulous history. Topics covered in the history commonly include urinary tract infection, strenuous (...) exertion, tropical exposure, recent strep throat, recent trauma, menstruation, bleeding tendency, bloody diarrhea, joint pains, rash, flank pain, frequency, and dysuria. Searching for occult forms of trauma, foreign body insertion, family history of sickle cell disease or hemophilia, stone disease, hearing loss, familial renal disease [1,2], and hypertension should be undertaken. Factitious causes of “hematuria,” such as food substances or medicines coloring the urine without actually having red blood

2018 American College of Radiology

72. Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Clinical Practice Guidelines: Joint Recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutritio

disease. Ifexcessiveirritabilityandpainisthesinglemanifestation,itisunlikely to be related to GERD. y Typical symptoms of GERD in older children. TABLE 2. ‘‘Red ?ag’’ symptoms and signs that suggest disorders other than gastroesophageal re?ux disease Symptoms and signs Remarks General Weight loss Lethargy Fever Excessive irritability/pain Suggesting a variety of conditions, including systemic infections Dysuria May suggest urinary tract infection, especially in infants and young children Onset (...) (QUIPS) tools. During a 3-day consensus meeting, all recommendations were discussed and ?nalized. In cases where no randomized controlled trials (RCT; therapeutic questions) or diagnostic accuracy studies were available to support the recom- mendations, expert opinion was used. The group members voted on each recommendation, using the nominal voting technique. With this approach, recommendations regarding evaluation and management of infants and children with GERD to standardize and improve quality

2018 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

74. 2018 United Kingdom National Guideline for the Management of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

occurs in most patients with appendicitis but only 50% of those with PID. Cervical movement pain will occur in about a quarter of women with appendicitis 29,30 . ? endometriosis – the relationship between symptoms and the menstrual cycle may be helpful in establishing a diagnosis ? complications of an ovarian cyst e.g. torsion or rupture – symptoms are often of sudden onset 8 ? urinary tract infection – often associated with dysuria and/or urinary frequency ? irritable bowel syndrome – disturbance (...) identified although use of clinical tests in guideline may improve diagnostic accuracy in non verbalising patients Dept of Health Low 21 Age - Older people - Children and young people - Young adults Young woman are disproportionately at greater risk of this condition in common with other sexually transmitted infections Accurate diagnosis and better tolerated treatments should improve the burden of disease in the community. Dept of Health Medium Sexual orientation and gender identity - Lesbians - Gay men

2018 British Association for Sexual Health and HIV

75. Adult Urodynamics

Quality: Grade C ) 19. Clinicians may perform videourodynamics in properly selected patients to localize the level of obstruction, particularly for the diagnosis of primary bladder neck obstruction. (Expert Opinion) Purpose Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which include urinary incontinence, are a common and significant source of impaired quality of life and comorbidity in large numbers of adults and children. Commonly, patients presenting with LUTS have overlapping symptoms and conditions, making

2018 American Urological Association

76. CRACKCast E174 – Genitourinary and Renal Tract Disorders

in real life if the dx is highly suspected). See Box 173.1: Cause of Dysuria in Children Infection Urinary tract infection, including cystitis and pyelonephritis Vaginitis resulting from Gardnerella, Trichomonas, Candida, or sexually transmitted organisms Pinworms Balanitis Irritation Bubble bath, new soaps, or douches Vaginal foreign body, such as retained toilet paper Trauma Sexual or physical abuse Straddle injury (unintentional) Self-stimulation or masturbation Other Labial adhesions Renal stones (...) ; eg, human papillomavirus [HPV], herpes), or nummular eczema may cause inflammation. Infectious organisms are gram-negative and gram-positive, including group A beta hemolytic streptococci and, rarely, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia. Canadia – is the most common fungal cause. Bacterial causes: In a study of uncircumcised children, the most common organisms found by age were E. coli (ages 0 to 2 years), enterococci (ages 3 to 6 years), and Staphylococcus aureus and group A beta-hemolytic

2018 CandiEM

77. British Association for Sexual Health and HIV national guideline for the management of infection with Mycoplasma genitalium

sexual contact and risk of reinfection) of individuals with disease caused by M. genitalium infection should be tested and/or offered epidemiological treatment (using the same antimicrobial regimen as used in the index patient). This is to reduce the risk of re-infection in the index case. 8 3. Clinical Features 3.1 Signs and symptoms in males: [3] None – the majority are asymptomatic [27] Urethral discharge Dysuria Penile irritation Urethral discomfort Urethritis (acute, persistent, recurrent (...) (e.g. expert opinions, letters to the editor, editorials (unless include original data), comments, not referring to M. genitalium) Study quality Study duration (no minimum) Number of subjects (no minimum) Study population Adults (aged >15 years or above) in Europe, N America, Australasia Children (=15 years) Adults (aged >15 years or above) outside Europe, N America, Australasia Study comparison Not applicable Specific outcomes of interest Sensitivity/specificity Inhibitory results Ability to test

2018 British Association for Sexual Health and HIV

78. Paediatric Urology

testes: European Association of Urology/European Society for Paediatric Urology Guidelines. J Pediatr Urol, 2016. 2. Stein, R., et al. Urinary tract infections in children: EAU/ESPU guidelines. Eur Urol, 2015. 67: 546. 3. Tekgul, S., et al. EAU guidelines on vesicoureteral reflux in children. Eur Urol, 2012. 62: 534. 4. Riedmiller, H., et al. EAU Guidelines on Paediatric Urology. Eur Urol, 2001. Nov; 40 (5): 589. 5. Guyatt, G.H., et al. GRADE: an emerging consensus on rating quality of evidence (...) of balanitis xerotica obliterans in boys younger than 10 years presenting with phimosis. Urol Int, 2013. 90: 439. 11. Celis, S., et al. Balanitis xerotica obliterans in children and adolescents: a literature review and clinical series. J Pediatr Urol, 2014. 10: 34. 12. Oster, J. Further fate of the foreskin. Incidence of preputial adhesions, phimosis, and smegma among Danish schoolboys. Arch Dis Child, 1968. 43: 200. 13. Palmer, L.S., et al., Management of abnormalities of the external genitalia in boys

2018 European Association of Urology

79. Neuro-urology

Med Child Neurol, 2014. 56: 59. 27. Samijn, B., et al. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urodynamic findings in children and adults with cerebral palsy: A systematic review. Neurourol Urodyn, 2017. 36: 541. 28. Tagliaferri, F., et al. A systematic review of brain injury epidemiology in Europe. Acta Neurochir (Wien), 2006. 148: 255. 29. Kulakli, F., et al. Relationship between urinary dysfunction and clinical factors in patients with traumatic brain injury. Brain Inj, 2014. 28: 323. 30. Aruga, S (...) . International Continence Society guidelines on urodynamic equipment performance. Neurourol Urodyn, 2014. 33: 370. 109. McGuire, E.J., et al. Leak-point pressures. Urol Clin North Am, 1996. 23: 253. 110. Ozkan, B., et al. Which factors predict upper urinary tract deterioration in overactive neurogenic bladder dysfunction? Urology, 2005. 66: 99. 111. Wang, Q.W., et al. Is it possible to use urodynamic variables to predict upper urinary tract dilatation in children with neurogenic bladder-sphincter dysfunction

2018 European Association of Urology

80. Urological Infections

. Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis. Int J Antimicrob Agents, 2009. 33: 111. 128. Bauer, H.W., et al. A long-term, multicenter, double-blind study of an Escherichia coli extract (OM-89) in female patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. Eur Urol, 2005. 47: 542. 129. Schwenger, E.M., et al. Probiotics for preventing urinary tract infections in adults and children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2015: CD008772. 130. Kontiokari, T., et al. Randomised trial

2018 European Association of Urology

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