How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

502 results for

Dysuria in Children

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Dysuria in Children

Dysuria in Children Dysuria in Children Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Dysuria in Children Dysuria in Children Aka (...) : Dysuria in Children From Related Chapters II. Causes See Chemical irritants (e.g. bubble bath) Physical irritants Self exploration Self-infusion of water into (common in boys) Local infection s Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Dysuria in Children." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Symptoms About

2018 FP Notebook

2. Urinary tract infections in children

://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22336827?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors fever >39°C (102.2°F) irritability (neonates and infants) poor feeding (neonates and infants) suprapubic tenderness costovertebral angle tenderness foul-smelling urine (infants, older children, and adolescents) dysuria (preschool age, older children, and adolescents) urinary frequency (older children and adolescents) abdominal/flank pain (infants, older children, and adolescents) vomiting ill appearance (neonates (...) Urinary tract infections in children Urinary tract infections in children - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Urinary tract infections in children Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: October 2018 Summary A common diagnosis among infants and children; if missed, can lead to renal scarring, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease. Non-specific signs and symptoms may herald UTI, and practitioners

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Urinary tract infections in children

://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22336827?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors fever >39°C (102.2°F) irritability (neonates and infants) poor feeding (neonates and infants) suprapubic tenderness costovertebral angle tenderness foul-smelling urine (infants, older children, and adolescents) dysuria (preschool age, older children, and adolescents) urinary frequency (older children and adolescents) abdominal/flank pain (infants, older children, and adolescents) vomiting ill appearance (neonates (...) Urinary tract infections in children Urinary tract infections in children - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Urinary tract infections in children Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: October 2018 Summary A common diagnosis among infants and children; if missed, can lead to renal scarring, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease. Non-specific signs and symptoms may herald UTI, and practitioners

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the management of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in children and young people

British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the management of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in children and young people British Association of Dermatologists' guidelines for the management of Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in children and young people, 2018 - McPherson - 2019 - British Journal of Dermatology - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search (...) term Search term The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Navigation Bar Menu Guidelines Free Access British Association of Dermatologists' guidelines for the management of Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in children and young people, 2018 Corresponding Author E-mail address: E-mail address: Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LE U.K Correspondence Tess McPherson. E‐mails

2019 British Association of Dermatologists

5. Dysuria in Children

Dysuria in Children Dysuria in Children Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Dysuria in Children Dysuria in Children Aka (...) : Dysuria in Children From Related Chapters II. Causes See Chemical irritants (e.g. bubble bath) Physical irritants Self exploration Self-infusion of water into (common in boys) Local infection s Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Dysuria in Children." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Symptoms About

2015 FP Notebook

6. Mangement and Screening of Primary Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children

to a common but poorly characterized complex of symptoms typically including urinary incontinence, dysuria, urinary tract infections (UTI), urinary frequency or infrequent voiding, and constipation. BBD is used to describe children with abnormal lower urinary tract symptoms of storage and/or emptying which include lower urinary tract conditions such as overactive bladder and urge incontinence, voiding postponement, underactive bladder, and voiding dysfunction, and may also include abnormal bowel patterns (...) Mangement and Screening of Primary Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children Vesicoureteral Reflux Guideline - American Urological Association advertisement Toggle navigation About Us About the AUA Membership AUA Governance Industry Relations Education AUAUniversity Education Products & Resources Normal Histology and Important Histo-anatomic Structures Urinary Bladder Prostate Kidney Renovascular Diseases Andrenal Gland Testis Paratesticular Tumors Penis Retroperitoneum Cytology Online Learning

2017 American Urological Association

7. Prevalence of idiopathic hypercalciuria in children with urinary system related symptoms attending a pediatric hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2014 (Full text)

IBM SPSS statistics 23.0 software and Chi-square and independent-samples t-test.Among the 321 children assessed, 153 (47.7%) had idiopathic hypercalciuria. The mean age of the children with idiopathic hypercalciuria was 55.20±43.71. Prevalence of idiopathic hypercalciuria was 48.3% in children with urinary tract infection, 54.9% and 53.6% in children with microscopic and macroscopic hematuria respectively, In children with dysuria, there were 52.1%, and 51.8% in children with frequency, 49.1 (...) Prevalence of idiopathic hypercalciuria in children with urinary system related symptoms attending a pediatric hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2014 Idiopathic hypercalciuria is a group of diseases which can be manifested with urinary symptoms. Its importance is due to high prevalence, recurrent infections, and stone formations which are often asymptomatic.The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of idiopathic hypercalciuria in children with urinary system related symptoms

2017 Electronic physician PubMed

8. Urinary Tract Infection in Children - Diagnosis

Urinary Tract Infection in Children - Diagnosis ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Diagnosis and Treatment of UTI in Children: Diagnosis September 2014 Page 1 of 23 DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN CHILDREN: DIAGNOSIS Date written: September 2014 Author: Joshua Kausman, Margie Danchin Scope of Guidelines Specialist assessment and management is required for children who are considered (...) at high risk of serious illness (underlying structural urinary tract abnormalities or neurogenic bladder or kidney transplant recipients). These children are beyond the scope of these guidelines and it is important that they are excluded from the recommendations detailed below. GUIDELINES a. We recommend that the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) only be made on the basis of clinical symptoms (see below) in association with a positive urine culture. (1B) b. We suggest that the presence

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

9. Urinary Tract Infection in Children - Acute management

of acute pyelonephritis in children. (1A). d. We recommend a duration of therapy for acute pyelonephritis of 7-10 days. (1D) Lower urinary tract infection (cystitis) e. We recommend short duration oral therapy (2-4 days) for treating lower UTI, defined as bacteriuria without fever or loin pain, but with localising signs such as dysuria, frequency, urgency and lower abdominal discomfort, as it is as effective as standard duration therapy (7- 14 days). (1A) UNGRADED SUGGESTIONS FOR CLINICAL CARE (...) Urinary Tract Infection in Children - Acute management ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Diagnosis and Treatment of UTI in Children: Acute Management September 2014 Page 1 of 13 DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN CHILDREN: ACUTE MANAGEMENT Date written: September 2014 Author: Peter Trnka, Steven McTaggart Scope of Guidelines Specialist assessment and management is required for children who

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Urinary Tract Infection in Children

in the scope of guideline above); ? Does not appear septic; ? Is able to tolerate oral medications. (1C) c. We do not recommend single dose therapy for the treatment of acute pyelonephritis in children. (1A) d. We recommend a duration of therapy for acute pyelonephritis of 7-10 days. (1D) Lower urinary tract infection (cystitis) e. We recommend short duration oral therapy (2-4 days) for treating lower UTI, defined as bacteriuria without fever or loin pain, but with localising signs such as dysuria (...) , abdominal pain and loin tenderness. Cystitis refers to infection limited to the bladder that is not associated with systemic features but may present with localising symptoms such as frequency, urgency, dysuria and suprapubic discomfort. Summary of the evidence: Initial treatment of urinary tract infection is guided by the clinical presentation. Children with significant systemic symptoms (fever, loin pain) have a clinical diagnosis of pyelonephritis but can be treated with oral antibiotics providing

2014 KHA-CARI Guidelines

11. Urinary tract infection in infants and children: Diagnosis and management

with symptoms suggestive of UTI (dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, abdominal pain, back pain or new daytime incontinence). A midstream urine sample should be collected for urinalysis and culture in toilet-trained children; others should have urine collected by catheter or by suprapubic aspirate. UTI is unlikely if the urinalysis is completely normal. A bagged urine sample may be used for urinalysis but should not be used for urine culture. Antibiotic treatment for seven to 10 days is recommended (...) Urinary tract infection in infants and children: Diagnosis and management Recent studies have resulted in major changes in the management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children. The present statement focuses on the diagnosis and management of infants and children >2 months of age with an acute UTI and no known underlying urinary tract pathology or risk factors for a neurogenic bladder. UTI should be ruled out in preverbal children with unexplained fever and in older children

2014 Canadian Paediatric Society

12. Targeted workup after initial febrile Urinary Tract Infection: Using a novel machine learning model to identify children most likely to benefit from VCUG. (PubMed)

Targeted workup after initial febrile Urinary Tract Infection: Using a novel machine learning model to identify children most likely to benefit from VCUG. Significant debate persists regarding appropriate work-up of children with initial UTI. Greatly preferable to "all-or-none" approaches in current guideline would be a model that can identify children at highest risk for both recurrent UTI and VUR to allow targeted VCUG, while children at low risk could be observed. We sought to develop (...) a model to predict probability of both recurrent UTI and VUR ("rUTI-associated VUR") among children after initial UTI.We included the RIVUR and CUTIE subjects, excluding the prophylaxis treatment arm from RIVUR. The main outcome was defined as rUTI-associated VUR. Missing data was imputed using optimal tree imputation. Data were split into training/validation/testing sets. Machine learning algorithm hyperparameters were tuned by the validation set with 5-fold cross validation.500 subjects (305 RIVUR

2019 Journal of Urology

13. The role of bladder function in the pathogenesis and treatment of urinary tract infections in toilet-trained children. (PubMed)

, constipation, or a combination of these factors. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed and MEDLINE and search terms included recurrent UTI, VUR, bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), constipation, lower urinary tract symptoms, and voiding dysfunction. Common presenting symptoms of UTI in children include fever (> 38 °C) with or without "traditional" lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as dysuria, malodorous urine, frequency, urgency, and incontinence. However, many infections (...) The role of bladder function in the pathogenesis and treatment of urinary tract infections in toilet-trained children. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common reason for referral to pediatric specialists and the risk profile of these children is influenced by age, sex, and underlying urinary tract abnormalities. UTIs in toilet-trained children represent a different entity than confirmed, febrile UTIs that occur in infants, impacted by suboptimal bladder habits, bladder dysfunction

2019 Pediatric Nephrology

14. Intermediate-Term Efficacy and Tolerance of Statins in Children. (PubMed)

Intermediate-Term Efficacy and Tolerance of Statins in Children. To evaluate the intermediate-term efficacy and tolerance of statins in children and adolescents with familial hypercholesterolemia.A total of 131 children or adolescents treated with statins for familial hypercholesterolemia were prospectively included. The efficacy of treatment was established by the percentage of children who achieved low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels <160 mg/dL during treatment. Treatment (...) cases of a clinically asymptomatic increase in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels, 2 cases of an increase in CPK levels with muscular symptoms, 14 cases of myalgia without an increase in CPK levels, 3 cases of abdominal pain, 1 case of dysuria, and 1 case of diffuse pain. None of these side effects led to the discontinuation of statin therapy, although a change of statin was required in 7 cases. This new statin was tolerated in all cases. No patients had abnormal liver function during treatment.The

2019 Journal of Pediatrics

15. Prostatic utricles without external genital anomalies in children: our experience, literature review, and pooling analysis. (Full text)

used in 3 cases. Open excision was used in 11 cases. The laparoscopic excision was chosen in 3 cases and Robot-assisted laparoscopy was reported in 1 case. Symptoms and signs disappeared after treatment in all children, and no recurrence occurred during follow-up.Prostate utricles without external genital anomalies are rarely reported in children, and are easily missed and misdiagnosed, often accompanied by recurrent urinary tract infections, lower urinary tract symptoms, epididymitis, dysuria (...) Prostatic utricles without external genital anomalies in children: our experience, literature review, and pooling analysis. It has been recognized that the incidence of prostatic utricle in boys is increasing and is closely associated with diseases such as hypospadias. However, the clinical features of prostatic utricle with normal external genitalia have received little attention.Based on this, a series of 22 male children with prostatic utricles has been compiled by adding our 3 patients

2019 BMC Urology PubMed

16. Post-renal transplant urolithiasis in children: an increasingly diagnosed complication: a retrospective cohort study. (PubMed)

Post-renal transplant urolithiasis in children: an increasingly diagnosed complication: a retrospective cohort study. Urolithiasis in renal transplant (RTx) recipients is a potential cause of allograft loss if obstruction is untreated. It is not clear if paediatric transplant recipients are following the global trend for increased prevalence of urolithiasis over time.A retrospective chart review was undertaken to evaluate the frequency, risk factors and characteristics of post-RTx urolithiasis (...) over two decades (1995-2016), in a tertiary Australian paediatric hospital.Stones were diagnosed in 8 of 142 (5.6%) recipients, 6 of whom were transplanted in the latter decade. All patients were male, with a median age 4.9 years and median weight 11.8 kg. Presentation was with haematuria (n=4), pain (n=2), dysuria (n=2), stone passage (n=1) and asymptomatic (n=1). Time to presentation was bimodal; three stones were identified in the initial 3 months post RTx and the remainder after 31-53 months

2019 Archives of Disease in Childhood

17. Eosinophilic cystitis in children: A case report (Full text)

Eosinophilic cystitis in children: A case report The aim of the present case report was to investigate the clinical features, pathological examination and treatment of eosinophilic cystitis (EC) in children. Two cases of EC were reported and reviewed from January 2016 to March 2017. Case 1 (male; 6 years old) had intermittent hematuria, frequent urination, urgent urination, difficulty in urination and abdominal pain. Case 2 (male; 7 years old) had frequent urination, urgent urination, urinary (...) pain, dysuria and suprapubic pain with no hematuria. One patient had a history of allergies and both patients underwent a cystoscope biopsy. Blood eosinophils were clearly increased and a bone marrow biopsy examination revealed that marrow eosinophils were also increased in both cases. The urine culture results were negative. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed uneven thickening of the bladder wall and diffusive mucosal lesions. Cystoscopy revealed that the bladder volume became

2018 Experimental and therapeutic medicine PubMed

18. Use of baclofen in children with dysfunctional voiding: a preliminary report (Full text)

Use of baclofen in children with dysfunctional voiding: a preliminary report The aims of the present study were to examine the effectiveness and safety of baclofen in children with dysfunctional voiding (DV).Thirty children with primary DV were enrolled. Patients underwent history taking, complete physical examination, urine analysis and culture, ultrasonography of the urinary system, a uroflowmetry study and post urine residue analysis. The Dysfunctional Voiding Symptom Score (DVSS (...) observed. The number of voluntary voiding and wetting episodes were significantly decreased after treatment with baclofen (p = 0.001). Three main complaints of the patients were urgency (p = 0.001), dysuria (p = 0.004) and straining (p = 0.004) and all were significantly decreased after medical therapy with baclofen.Baclofen may be useful in treatment of pediatric dysfunctional voiding. It was well tolerated among our patients with a remarkable reduction in their symptoms.

2018 Central European journal of urology PubMed

19. Frequency and features of nocturnal enuresis in Pakistani children aged 5 to 16 years based on ICCS criteria: a multi-center cross-sectional study from Karachi, Pakistan. (Full text)

, it is often associated with lower urinary tract symptoms like dysuria, urgency, suprapubic pain, and daytime incontinence. Children presenting with NE often have co-morbid conditions like constipation, urinary tract infection, sleep disorders, and developmental delay. Many children presenting with these conditions as the primary complaint may also have NE. It should be addressed as unrecognized and untreated NE can cause additional morbidity and distress. (...) Frequency and features of nocturnal enuresis in Pakistani children aged 5 to 16 years based on ICCS criteria: a multi-center cross-sectional study from Karachi, Pakistan. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is a common symptom in children worldwide. International Children's Continence Society (ICCS) defines enuresis as either mono-symptomatic, NE with lower urinary tract symptoms and NE with co-morbid conditions. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequencies and types of NE and associated

2018 BMC Family Practice PubMed

20. Zinc Supplementation in Treatment of Children With Urinary Tract Infection. (PubMed)

Zinc Supplementation in Treatment of Children With Urinary Tract Infection. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is very common in children. Precocious diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important because of the permanent disease complications. Zinc increases the response to treatment in many infections. In this study, we explored the effect of zinc in treating UTI.Two hundred children with UTI were divided into 2 groups of 100 who were comparable in terms of age, sex, urine laboratory profiles (...) , and clinical signs and symptoms. The control group received a standard treatment protocol for UTI and the intervention group received oral zinc sulfate syrup plus routine treatment of UTI.A faster recovery was observed in the patients receiving zinc, but abdominal pain was exacerbated by zinc and lasted longer. Three months after the treatment, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the time of fever stop and negative urine culture.In children with UTI, zinc supplementation has

2017 Iranian journal of kidney diseases

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>