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Diptera

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1681. Evidence for inversion polymorphism related to sympatric host race formation in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella. (PubMed)

Evidence for inversion polymorphism related to sympatric host race formation in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella. Evidence suggests that the apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) is undergoing sympatric speciation (i.e., divergence without geographic isolation) in the process of shifting and adapting to a new host plant. Prior to the introduction of cultivated apples (Malus pumila) in North America, R. pomonella infested the fruit of native hawthorns (Crataegus spp

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2003 Genetics

1682. Parasite-specific immune response in adult Drosophila melanogaster: a genomic study (PubMed)

Parasite-specific immune response in adult Drosophila melanogaster: a genomic study Insects of the order Diptera are vectors for parasitic diseases such as malaria, sleeping sickness and leishmania. In the search for genes encoding proteins involved in the antiparasitic response, we have used the protozoan parasite Octosporea muscaedomesticae for oral infections of adult Drosophila melanogaster. To identify parasite-specific response molecules, other flies were exposed to virus, bacteria

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2004 EMBO reports

1683. RNomics in Drosophila melanogaster: identification of 66 candidates for novel non-messenger RNAs (PubMed)

(snoRNAs), divided into 15 members from the C/D subclass and 20 members from the H/ACA subclass, which mostly guide 2'-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively, of rRNA and snRNAs. These also include two outstanding C/D snoRNAs, U3 and U14, both functioning as pre-rRNA chaperones. Surprisingly, the sequence of the Drosophila U14 snoRNA reflects a major change of function of this snoRNA in Diptera relative to yeast and vertebrates. Among the 22 snmRNAs lacking known sequence and structure

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2003 Nucleic acids research

1684. Comparison of K+-channel genes within the genomes of Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster (PubMed)

Comparison of K+-channel genes within the genomes of Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster Potassium channels are the largest and most diverse type of ion channel found in nature. The completion of the sequencing of the genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae, which belong to the same order, the Diptera, allows us to compare and contrast K+-channel genes and gene families present within the genomes of two dipterans.This study identifies at least eight voltage-gated K

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2003 Genome Biology

1685. Vibrio cholerae Hemagglutinin/Protease Degrades Chironomid Egg Masses (PubMed)

Vibrio cholerae Hemagglutinin/Protease Degrades Chironomid Egg Masses Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by specific serogroups of Vibrio cholerae that are pathogenic to humans. The disease does not persist in a chronic state in humans or animals. The pathogen is naturally present as a free-living organism in the environment. Recently, it was suggested that egg masses of the nonbiting midge Chironomus sp. (Diptera) harbor and serve as a nutritive source for V. cholerae, thereby

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2003 Applied and environmental microbiology

1686. Activity of Free and Clay-Bound Insecticidal Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis against the Mosquito Culex pipiens (PubMed)

Activity of Free and Clay-Bound Insecticidal Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis against the Mosquito Culex pipiens Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis produces parasporal insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) that have larvicidal activity against some members of the order Diptera, such as blackflies and mosquitoes. Hydrolysis of the ICPs in the larval gut results in four major proteins with a molecular mass of 27, 65, 128, and 135 kDa. Toxicity is caused by synergistic

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2003 Applied and environmental microbiology

1687. Vertebrate host specificity of wild-caught blackflies revealed by mitochondrial DNA in blood. (PubMed)

Vertebrate host specificity of wild-caught blackflies revealed by mitochondrial DNA in blood. Blood-feeding blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) transmit pathogens, harass vertebrate hosts and may cause lethal injuries in attacked victims, but with traditional methods it has proved difficult to identify their hosts. By matching mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences in blood collected from engorged blackflies with stored sequences in the GenBank database, relationships between 17 blackfly species

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2004 Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

1688. Pseudocopulatory Pollination in Lepanthes (Orchidaceae: Pleurothallidinae) by Fungus Gnats (PubMed)

and illustrated.Visitors to flowers of L. glicensteinii were photographed and their behaviour documented; some were captured for identification. Occasional visits to flowers of L. helleri, L. stenorhyncha and L. turialvae were also observed. Structural features of flowers and pollinators were studied with SEM.Sexually aroused males of the fungus gnat Bradysia floribunda (Diptera: Sciaridae) were the only visitors and pollinators of L. glicensteinii. The initial long-distance attractant seems to be olfactory. Upon

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2005 Annals of botany

1689. Reciprocal regulation of glutathione S-transferase spliceforms and the Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway components (PubMed)

Reciprocal regulation of glutathione S-transferase spliceforms and the Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway components In mammalian systems, detoxification enzymes of the GST (glutathione S-transferase) family regulate JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) signal transduction by interaction with JNK itself or other proteins upstream in the JNK pathway. In the present study, we have studied GSTs and their interaction with components of the JNK pathway from Diptera. We have evaluated the effects

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2004 Biochemical Journal

1690. Pollination Ecology of Four Epiphytic Orchids of New Zealand (PubMed)

visitors observed in the genus Earina belong to Diptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera and to Diptera and Hymenoptera in W. cunninghamii.Contrary to many epiphytic orchids in the tropics, the orchid-pollinator relationship in these orchids is unspecialized and flowers are visited by a wide range of insects. Putative pollinators are flies of the families Bibionidae, Calliphoridae, Syrphidae and Tachinidae. All four orchids display anthecological adaptations to a myophilous pollination system such as simple

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2004 Annals of botany

1691. Ultraconserved elements in insect genomes: A highly conserved intronic sequence implicated in the control of homothorax mRNA splicing (PubMed)

spans an internal exon-intron junction, with the majority located within the intron, and is predicted to form a highly stable stem-loop RNA structure. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis of different hth splice isoforms and Northern blotting showed that the conserved element is associated with a high incidence of intron retention in hth pre-mRNA, suggesting that the conserved intronic element is critically important in the post-transcriptional regulation of hth expression in Diptera.

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2005 Genome Research

1692. Expression of mRNA for the t;chcomplex polypeptide–1, a subunit of chaperonin CCT, is upregulated in association with increased cold hardiness in Delia antiqua (PubMed)

Expression of mRNA for the t;chcomplex polypeptide–1, a subunit of chaperonin CCT, is upregulated in association with increased cold hardiness in Delia antiqua Summer-diapause and winter-diapause pupae of the onion maggot, Delia antiqua (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), were significantly more cold hardy than nondiapause, prediapause, and postdiapause pupae. Moreover, cold acclimation of nondiapause pupae conferred strong cold hardiness comparable with that of diapause pupae. Differential display

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2005 Cell stress & chaperones

1693. Pollination in Brazilian Syngonanthus (Eriocaulaceae) Species: Evidence for Entomophily Instead of Anemophily (PubMed)

them on the same capitulum. The pollen viability of S. mucugensis was 88.6%, and 92.5% for S. curralensis. The inflorescences of both species demonstrated ultraviolet absorbance, and a sweet odour was detected during both the staminate and pistillate phases. No nectar production was ever noted, although nectaries are present. Both species were visited by numerous groups of insects, with the Diptera being the principal pollinators, especially the species of Syrphidae and Bombyliidae. There were (...) secondary pollinators among species of Coleoptera and Hymenoptera. There was no evidence of wind pollination. Syngonanthus mucugensis is a self-compatible species, and forms fruits by agamospermy at low frequencies.This is apparently the first report for pollination biology and mating systems of Eriocaulaceae. Conversely to that stated by some authors, entomophily, mainly effected by species of Diptera but also by species of Coleoptera and Hymenoptera, is probably the only pollination system

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2005 Annals of botany

1694. Role of ivermectin in the treatment of severe orbital myiasis due to Cochliomyia hominivorax. (PubMed)

Role of ivermectin in the treatment of severe orbital myiasis due to Cochliomyia hominivorax. We describe 2 patients with severe orbital myiasis due to Cochliomyia hominivorax (of the order Diptera and the family Calliphoridae) who had underlying skin carcinomas and were treated with oral ivermectin and debridement. We suggest that ivermectin plays an important role in the treatment of severe cases of myiasis.

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2006 Clinical Infectious Diseases

1695. Individual fecundity and senescence in Drosophila and medfly. (PubMed)

different ways of aging in various Diptera species. Finally, we discuss the possible implications of this finding.

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2005 Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

1696. West Nile virus risk assessment and the bridge vector paradigm. (PubMed)

of vectors. This analysis suggests that 2 species (Culex pipiens L. and Cx. restuans Theobald [Diptera: Cilicidae]) not previously considered important in transmitting WNV to humans may be responsible for up to 80% of human WNV infections in this region. This finding suggests that control efforts should be focused on these species which may reduce effects on nontarget wetland organisms. Our risk measure has broad applicability to other regions and diseases and can be adapted for use as a predictive tool

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2005 Emerging Infectious Diseases

1697. Myiasis in Kuwait: nosocomial infections caused by lucilia sericata and Megaselia scalaris. (PubMed)

Myiasis in Kuwait: nosocomial infections caused by lucilia sericata and Megaselia scalaris. Myiasis, the invasion of live human tissue by larvae of Diptera, is reported in the nasopharynx and a leg wound in two patients who were hospitalized for more than 72 hours in Mubarak Al-Kabeer Teaching Hospital in Kuwait City, Kuwait. On the fourth and fifth days after a 10-year-old Kuwaiti boy was admitted to the hospital intensive care unit in a bloodied and comatose state following a traffic accident (...) , 'worms' that came out of his nostrils were fixed, cleared, and identified as second and third instar of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae). After 14 days, 'worms' were seen in the original dressing of a 35-year-old Iranian man admitted to the Orthopedic Unit of the hospital with multiple lacerations and fractures. The larvae, in various stages of development, were identified as those of Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae). Since the presence of larvae in both patients was recorded after

2004 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

1698. Population dynamics of an endogenous meiotic drive system in Aedes aegypti in Trinidad. (PubMed)

Population dynamics of an endogenous meiotic drive system in Aedes aegypti in Trinidad. An endogenous meiotic drive system was previously reported to be segregating in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) population in Trinidad. The meiotic driver (M(D)) is tightly linked to the male determining locus and selectively targets sensitive responders linked to the female determining allele, causing fragmentation of female gametes. This results in highly male-biased progeny

2006 American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

1699. Abandoning small-scale fish farming in western Kenya leads to higher malaria vector abundance. (PubMed)

populations of fishponds in Kisii Central District in western Kenya. Two hundred and sixty one fishponds were found, 186 active (fish present) and 75 abandoned (fish absent). Vegetation was not significantly associated with the distribution of Anopheles gambiae s.l., Anopheles funestus or culicines (Diptera: Culicidae) in active or abandoned ponds. The presence of fish, however, correlated significantly with the distribution of all mosquito species, with significantly higher mosquito densities

2007 Acta Tropica

1700. Water quality and immatures of the M and S forms of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in a Malian village. (PubMed)

Water quality and immatures of the M and S forms of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in a Malian village. The associations between the immatures of Anopheles gambiae s.s. (Diptera: Culicidae), its M and S forms, and Anopheles arabiensis among and within larval breeding habitats in Banambani, Mali were investigated under varying conditions of water quality and rainfall. The intent was to elucidate on niche partitioning of these taxa.Immatures of An. arabiensis, An. gambiae s.s., and its

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2006 Malaria journal

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