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141. The uptake of cardiac glycosides in relation to their actions in isolated cardiac muscle Full Text available with Trip Pro

The uptake of cardiac glycosides in relation to their actions in isolated cardiac muscle 1. The uptake of (3)H-digitoxin, (3)H-ouabain and (3)H-dihydro-ouabain by isolated guinea-pig atria has been studied and compared with the inhibition of the sodium pump and with the inotropic effect.2. Analysis of the curve relating the uptake of digitoxin and ouabain at equilibrium to the bath concentration enabled a non-saturable and a saturable binding site to be distinguished.3. The uptake of inactive (...) a half-saturation of the saturable binding site.7. It is concluded that binding to the saturable site may be responsible for the cardiac actions of the glycosides.

1972 British journal of pharmacology

142. Interactions of digitalis and class-III antiarrhythmic drugs: Amiodarone versus dronedarone. (Abstract)

Interactions of digitalis and class-III antiarrhythmic drugs: Amiodarone versus dronedarone. A post hoc analysis of the PALLAS trial suggested possible interactions of dronedarone and digitalis glycosides. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects dronedarone or amiodarone in combination with digitalis glycosides.Eleven female rabbits underwent chronic oral treatment with amiodarone (50mg/kg/d for 6weeks). Ten rabbits were treated with dronedarone (50mg/kg/d for 6weeks). Ten

2016 International journal of cardiology

143. Digitalis toxicity: ECG vignette Full Text available with Trip Pro

Digitalis toxicity: ECG vignette "Digitalis toxicity, often candidly indexed as poisoning, has plagued the medical profession for over 200 years. The situation qualifies as a professional disgrace on the basis of three items: the situation persists, physicians are often slow to recognize it and, over the decades, writers have been harsh in their denunciation of fellow physicians when toxicity has occurred…." These are the opening remarks of an essay published in 1983 on the 2nd centenary (...) of William Withering's 'magic potion from foxglove's extract for dropsy.' Even today, after many decades, these words appear relevant! We present and discuss an interesting ECG of digitalis toxicity.Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2016 Indian heart journal

144. Comfrey herbal remedy causing second-degree heart block: do not be outfoxed by digitalis Full Text available with Trip Pro

node block, Mobitz Type 2, a shortened QT interval, downsloping ST depression and presence of U waves. After viewing the images of comfrey and foxglove, it highlighted the possibility of mistaken ingestion of Digitalis, containing the organic forms of cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin and digitoxin. Raised serum digoxin levels confirmed this. The patient was haemodynamically stable, and given digoxin-binding antibodies. After 5 days of cardiac monitoring, her ECG returned to normal rhythm (...) Comfrey herbal remedy causing second-degree heart block: do not be outfoxed by digitalis A previously well woman aged 63 years presents to the emergency department with vomiting, palpitations and 3 presyncopal episodes. She had no previous medical or cardiac history, with the patient stating that she tried a herbal remedy of boiled comfrey leaves for insomnia 18 hours before arrival to the department. Her ECG showed multiple abnormalities, including bradycardia, second-degree atrioventricular

2016 BMJ case reports

145. Cardiac glycosides and the risk of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

Cardiac glycosides and the risk of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) an outcome is measured at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration of reperfusion (if applicable). ">Data to be extracted: animal model Example: Dose, timing

2016 PROSPERO

146. A novel cell-based high-throughput screen for inhibitors of HIV-1 gene expression and budding identifies the cardiac glycosides. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A novel cell-based high-throughput screen for inhibitors of HIV-1 gene expression and budding identifies the cardiac glycosides. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is the mainstay of treatment for HIV-1 infection. While current HAART regimens have been extremely effective, issues of associated toxicity, cost and resistance remain and there is a need for novel antiretroviral compounds to complement the existing therapy. We sought to develop a novel high-throughput method (...) for identifying compounds that block later steps in the life cycle not targeted by current therapy.We designed a high-throughput screen to identify inhibitors of post-integration steps in the HIV-1 life cycle. The screening method was applied to a library of compounds that included numerous FDA-approved small molecules.Among the small molecules that inhibited late stages in HIV-1 replication were members of the cardiac glycoside family. We demonstrate that cardiac glycosides potently inhibit HIV-1 gene

2013 Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

147. Ryanodine receptor phosphorylation by oxidized CaMKII contributes to the cardiotoxic effects of cardiac glycosides. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ryanodine receptor phosphorylation by oxidized CaMKII contributes to the cardiotoxic effects of cardiac glycosides. Recent studies suggest that proarrhythmic effects of cardiac glycosides (CGs) on cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) handling involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the specific pathway(s) of ROS production and the subsequent downstream molecular events that mediate CG-dependent arrhythmogenesis remain to be defined.We examined the effects of digitoxin (DGT) on Ca(2

2013 Cardiovascular Research

148. Endogenous Digitalis-Like Factors: An Overview of the History Full Text available with Trip Pro

Endogenous Digitalis-Like Factors: An Overview of the History The sodium pump is a ubiquitous cell surface enzyme, a Na, K ATPase, which maintains ion gradients between cells and the extracellular fluid (ECF). The extracellular domain of this enzyme contains a highly conserved binding site, a receptor for a plant derived family of compounds, the digitalis glycosides. These compounds inhibit the enzyme and are used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and certain cardiac arrhythmias (...) . The highly conserved nature of this enzyme and its digitalis receptor led to early suggestions that endogenous regulators might exist. Recent examination of this hypothesis emerged from research in two separate areas: the regulation of ECF volume by a natriuretic hormone (NH), and the regulation of peripheral vascular resistance by a circulating inhibitor of vascular Na, K ATPase. These two areas merged with the hypothesis that NH and the vascular Na, K ATPase inhibitor were in fact the same entity

2015 Frontiers in endocrinology

149. Digoxin versus placebo, no intervention, or other medical interventions for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter: a protocol for a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

Digoxin versus placebo, no intervention, or other medical interventions for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter: a protocol for a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external (...) or unclear, we will attempt to contact authors by e-mail (max. 2 attempts). In case an outcome is measured at multiple time points, data from the time point where efficacy is highest will be included. ">Methods for data extraction Example: Experimental groups, control group(s) and number of animals per group. ">Data to be extracted: study design Example: Species, sex, weight, age, co‐morbidity, anaesthetic agent used, method of induction of cardiac ischemia, duration of ischemia and duration

2017 PROSPERO

150. Anticancer activity of cardiac glycosides: At the frontier between cell-autonomous and immunological effects Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticancer activity of cardiac glycosides: At the frontier between cell-autonomous and immunological effects Retrospective clinical data indicate that cardiac glycosides (CGs), notably digoxin, prolong the survival of carcinoma patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. CGs are known to influence the immune response at multiple levels. In addition, recent results suggest that CGs trigger the immunogenic demise of cancer cells, an effect that most likely contributes to their clinical

2012 Oncoimmunology

151. Zebrafish Chemical Screening Reveals the Impairment of Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival by Cardiac Glycosides Full Text available with Trip Pro

Zebrafish Chemical Screening Reveals the Impairment of Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival by Cardiac Glycosides Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the prominent degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons among other cell types. Here we report a first chemical screen of over 5,000 compounds in zebrafish, aimed at identifying small molecule modulators of DA neuron development or survival. We find that Neriifolin, a member of the cardiac glycoside family of compounds (...) , impairs survival but not differentiation of both zebrafish and mammalian DA neurons. Cardiac glycosides are inhibitors of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and widely used for treating heart disorders. Our data suggest that Neriifolin impairs DA neuronal survival by targeting the neuronal enriched Na(+)/K(+) ATPase α3 subunit (ATP1A3). Modulation of ionic homeostasis, knockdown of p53, or treatment with antioxidants protects DA neurons from Neriifolin-induced death. These results reveal a previously unknown

2012 PloS one

152. The traditional medical uses and cytotoxic activities of sixty-one Egyptian plants: Discovery of an active cardiac glycoside from Urginea maritima. (Abstract)

The traditional medical uses and cytotoxic activities of sixty-one Egyptian plants: Discovery of an active cardiac glycoside from Urginea maritima. Medicinal plants from the Sinai desert are widely used in traditional Bedouin medicine to treat a range of conditions including, cancers, and may thus be useful sources of novel anti-tumor compounds. Information on plants used in this way was obtained through collaboration with Bedouin herbalists.To document the traditional uses of 61 species from (...) and identify its active components.The most potent extracts were those from Asclepias sinaica, Urginea maritima, Nerium oleander and Catharanthus roseus, followed by those from Cichorium endivia, Pulicaria undulate and Melia azedarach. Literature reports indicate that several of these plants produce cardiac glycosides. Bioassay-guided fractionation of alcoholic U. maritima extracts led to the isolation of a bioactive bufadienolide that was subsequently shown to be proscillaridin A, as determined by 1D

2012 Journal of Ethnopharmacology

153. Human Cytomegalovirus Inhibition by Cardiac Glycosides - Evidence for Involvement of human Ether-a-go-go (hERG) Gene. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Human Cytomegalovirus Inhibition by Cardiac Glycosides - Evidence for Involvement of human Ether-a-go-go (hERG) Gene. Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a major threat for pregnant women and the immunocompromised population. Although several anti-HCMV therapies are available, the development of new anti-HCMV agents is highly desired. There is growing interest in identifying compounds that might inhibit HCMV by modulating the cellular milieu. Interest in cardiac (...) glycosides (CG), used in patients with congestive heart failure, has increased because of their established anticancer and their suggested antiviral activities. We report that the several CG--digoxin, digitoxin, and ouabain--are potent inhibitors of HCMV at nM concentrations. HCMV inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication, but following binding to its cellular receptors. The levels of immediate early, early, and late viral proteins and cellular NF-κB were significantly reduced in CG-treated cells

2012 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

154. Has The Digoxin Death Knell Sounded: Farewell To Foxglove?

Has The Digoxin Death Knell Sounded: Farewell To Foxglove? Has The Digoxin Death Knell Sounded: Farewell To Foxglove? | The Skeptical Cardiologist Primary Menu Search for: , , Has The Digoxin Death Knell Sounded: Farewell To Foxglove? The lovely but deadly foxglove plant encountered randomly on a hike through glorious Wales on a dreary, rainy day. The skeptical cardiologist is fascinated by the cardiac drug digoxin and the plant from which it is derived, the foxglove. I wrote about “foxglove (...) increased risk of sudden death after starting digoxin use. Most sudden deaths occurred within six months after digoxin was started. – Risk of death with initiation of digoxin was increased in patients with and without heart failure. The use of foxglove to treat dropsy is a fascinating and instructive chapter in the history of medicine. This study added to prior systematic reviews suggests that it is time to end the use of digitalis and close the chapter. William Withering might turn over in his grave

2017 The Skeptical Cardiologist

155. THE EFFECTS OF THE CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES UPON THE DYNAMICS OF THE CIRCULATION IN CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE. I. OUABAIN Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE EFFECTS OF THE CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES UPON THE DYNAMICS OF THE CIRCULATION IN CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE. I. OUABAIN 16695577 2006 05 31 2018 11 13 0021-9738 27 5 1948 Sep The Journal of clinical investigation J. Clin. Invest. THE EFFECTS OF THE CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES UPON THE DYNAMICS OF THE CIRCULATION IN CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE. I. OUABAIN. 588-99 Bloomfield R A RA Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services [Harvard], Boston City Hospital, Boston. Rapoport B B Milnor J P JP

1948 Journal of Clinical Investigation

156. The action of cardiac glycosides on autonomic ganglia Full Text available with Trip Pro

The action of cardiac glycosides on autonomic ganglia 13199251 2003 05 01 2018 12 01 0366-0826 9 3 1954 Sep British journal of pharmacology and chemotherapy Br J Pharmacol Chemother The action of cardiac glycosides on autonomic ganglia. 324-8 PERRY W L WL REINERT H H eng Journal Article England Br J Pharmacol Chemother 0154627 0366-0826 0 Autonomic Agents 0 Cardiac Glycosides 0 Digitalis Glycosides 0 Strophanthins OM Autonomic Agents Cardiac Glycosides Digitalis Digitalis Glycosides Ganglia (...) Ganglia, Autonomic drug effects Humans Plants, Medicinal Strophanthins 5527:10896:142:190:432:440 DIGITALIS GANGLIA, AUTONOMIC/effect of drugs on SQUILL STROPHANTHIN 1954 9 1 1954 9 1 0 1 1954 9 1 0 0 ppublish 13199251 PMC1509395 Arch Int Pharmacodyn Ther. 1952 Apr;89(3):343-52 14953540 Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Exp Pathol Pharmakol. 1951;213(5):373-86 14934129 J Physiol. 1953 Mar;119(4):439-54 13053448 J Physiol. 1953 Apr 28;120(1-2):122-8 13062225 J Physiol. 1953 Jan;119(1):43-57 13035716 J Physiol

1954 British journal of pharmacology and chemotherapy

157. Cardiac Glycosides in the Treatment of Cardiogenic Shock Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cardiac Glycosides in the Treatment of Cardiogenic Shock 14363753 2003 05 01 2018 12 01 0007-1447 1 4919 1955 Apr 16 British medical journal Br Med J Cardiac glycosides in the treatment of cardiogenic shock. 937-9 GORLIN R R ROBIN E D ED eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Cardiac Glycosides OM Cardiac Glycosides therapeutic use Humans Shock Shock, Cardiogenic 5528:14587:118:512 CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES/therapeutic use SHOCK 1955 4 16 1955 4 16 0 1 1955 4 16 0 0 ppublish 14363753

1955 British medical journal

158. The effects of certain physical factors and of the cardiac glycosides on sodium transfer by mouse ascites tumour cells Full Text available with Trip Pro

The effects of certain physical factors and of the cardiac glycosides on sodium transfer by mouse ascites tumour cells 13514650 2000 07 01 2018 12 01 0022-3751 140 1 1958 Jan 23 The Journal of physiology J. Physiol. (Lond.) The effects of certain physical factors and of the cardiac glycosides on sodium transfer by mouse ascites tumour cells. 61-79 MAIZELS M M REMINGTON M M TRUSCOE R R eng Journal Article England J Physiol 0266262 0022-3751 0 Cardiac Glycosides 0 Ions 0 Sodium, Dietary (...) 9NEZ333N27 Sodium OM Animals Ascites Cardiac Glycosides pharmacology Ions Mice Neoplasms metabolism Sodium metabolism Sodium, Dietary 5834:7021:120:404:555 CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES/effects NEOPLASMS/metabolism SODIUM/metabolism 1958 1 23 1958 1 23 0 1 1958 1 23 0 0 ppublish 13514650 PMC1358710 J Physiol. 1954 Aug 27;125(2):263-77 13192817 J Physiol. 1955 Sep 28;129(3):464-75 13264110 J Physiol. 1955 Sep 28;129(3):476-503 13264111 Biochem J. 1956 Feb;62(2):241-8 13293179 J Physiol. 1956 May 28;132(2):414-41

1958 The Journal of physiology

159. THE KINETICS OF CARDIAC GLYCOSIDE INHIBITION OF POTASSIUM TRANSPORT IN HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE KINETICS OF CARDIAC GLYCOSIDE INHIBITION OF POTASSIUM TRANSPORT IN HUMAN ERYTHROCYTES 13385455 2002 05 01 2018 12 01 0022-1295 40 2 1956 Nov 20 The Journal of general physiology J. Gen. Physiol. The kinetics of cardiac glycoside inhibition of potassium transport in human erythrocytes. 327-50 GILL T J TJ 3rd GOLD G L GL SOLOMON A K AK eng Journal Article United States J Gen Physiol 2985110R 0022-1295 0 Cardiac Glycosides RWP5GA015D Potassium OM Cardiac Glycosides pharmacology Erythrocytes (...) Ion Transport Kinetics Potassium blood 5731:31989 CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES/effects POTASSIUM/in blood 1956 11 20 1956 11 20 0 1 1956 11 20 0 0 ppublish 13385455 PMC2147622 J Gen Physiol. 1952 May;36(1):57-110 12981235 Circulation. 1953 Feb;7(2):161-8 13019930 Nature. 1953 Nov 14;172(4385):911-2 13111226 Helv Physiol Pharmacol Acta. 1953;11(4):346-54 13142506 J Gen Physiol. 1954 May 20;37(5):643-61 13163363 J Gen Physiol. 1955 Jan 20;38(3):371-88 13221778 J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1955 Nov;115(3):305-18

1956 The Journal of general physiology

160. The action of cardiac glycosides on sodium and potassium movements in human red cells Full Text available with Trip Pro

The action of cardiac glycosides on sodium and potassium movements in human red cells 13417139 2002 05 01 2018 12 01 0022-3751 136 1 1957 Apr 03 The Journal of physiology J. Physiol. (Lond.) The action of cardiac glycosides on sodium and potassium movements in human red cells. 148-73 GLYNN I M IM eng Journal Article England J Physiol 0266262 0022-3751 0 Cardiac Glycosides 0 Ions 0 Sodium, Dietary 9NEZ333N27 Sodium RWP5GA015D Potassium OM Cardiac Glycosides pharmacology Erythrocytes Humans Ions (...) Potassium blood Sodium blood Sodium, Dietary 5732:15064 CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES/effects POTASSIUM/in blood SODIUM/in blood 1957 4 3 1957 4 3 0 1 1957 4 3 0 0 ppublish 13417139 PMC1358859 Experientia. 1954 Jul 15;10(7):311-2 13183086 J Physiol. 1955 Sep 28;129(3):464-75 13264110 J Physiol. 1956 Nov 28;134(2):278-310 13398911 Nature. 1950 Apr 15;165(4198):604 15416715 J Cell Physiol. 1952 Dec;40(3):529-48 13011177 J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1953 Nov;109(3):233-43 13109682 Helv Physiol Pharmacol Acta. 1953;11(4):346

1957 The Journal of physiology

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