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Diarrhea Secondary to Medications

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121. Medical Management of Kidney Stones

. Diet therapy has never been compared head-to-head with pharmacologic therapy. As such, recommendations by the Panel incorporate drugs and/or diet therapy in select circumstances, until the superiority of one over the other can be demonstrated and to allow individualization for particular patients. Evaluation Guideline Statement 1 A clinician should perform a screening evaluation consisting of a detailed medical and dietary history, serum chemistries and urinalysis on a patient newly diagnosed (...) Safety and Quality of Care Accreditations and Reporting Patient Education Medical Management of Kidney Stones (2014) Published 2014 The purpose of the clinical guideline on Medical Management of Kidney Stones is to provide a clinical framework for the diagnosis, prevention and follow-up of adult patients with kidney stones based on the best available published literature. Topics covered include evaluation, diet therapy, pharmacologic therapy, and follow-up. [pdf] Panel Members Margaret Sue Pearle, MD

2014 American Urological Association

122. Combined Therapy of Nivolumab and Adoptive T Cell Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma Patients

patients. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Melanoma Drug: TIL + IL-2 + Nivolumab Phase 1 Phase 2 Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 11 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Combined Therapy of Nivolumab and Adoptive T Cell Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma Patients: Pilot Study Phase I/II Actual Study Start Date (...) , http://ctep.cancer.gov) Secondary Outcome Measures : Efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy associated to intravenous injections of Nivolumab [ Time Frame: At 12 months ] The overall tumor response will be evaluated according to the guidelines for Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST1.1) and immune-related Response Criteria (irRC) Duration of the clinical response [ Time Frame: Within 12 months of follow-up ] Time interval between the evaluation of the first objective response

2017 Clinical Trials

123. Traditional Chinese medicine for treating HIV-related diarrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials

Traditional Chinese medicine for treating HIV-related diarrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) by full-text screening of the eligible articles for final inclusion. In each phase, 2 observers will independently assess each article. Discrepancies will be resolved through discussion, or by consulting a third investigator. ">Procedure for study selection Example : Title-abstract screening: 1. Not an original full research paper (e.g. review, editorial) 2. Not an in vivo animal study 3. No metastases/ only primary tumor 4. No control group 5. Combination therapy or contamination 6. Not about

2017 PROSPERO

124. Patient-Reported Toxicity During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: NRG Oncology-RTOG 1203 Full Text available with Trip Pro

or almost constant diarrhea ( P = .01), and more patients who received standard RT were taking antidiarrheal medications four or more times daily (20.4% v 7.8%; P = .04). Conclusion Pelvic IMRT was associated with significantly less GI and urinary toxicity than standard RT from the patient's perspective. (...) Patient-Reported Toxicity During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: NRG Oncology-RTOG 1203 Purpose NRG Oncology/RTOG 1203 was designed to compare patient-reported acute toxicity and health-related quality of life during treatment with standard pelvic radiation or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in women with cervical and endometrial cancer. Methods Patients were randomly assigned to standard four-field radiation therapy (RT) or IMRT radiation treatment. The primary end

2018 EvidenceUpdates

125. MONARCH 3: Abemaciclib As Initial Therapy for Advanced Breast Cancer (Abstract)

inhibitor in 493 postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer who had no prior systemic therapy in the advanced setting. Patients received abemaciclib or placebo (150 mg twice daily continuous schedule) plus either 1 mg anastrozole or 2.5 mg letrozole, daily. The primary objective was investigator-assessed progression-free survival. Secondary objectives included response evaluation and safety. A planned interim analysis occurred after 189 events. Results Median progression (...) 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (21.1% v 1.2%), diarrhea (9.5% v 1.2%), and leukopenia (7.6% v 0.6%). Conclusion Abemaciclib plus a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor was effective as initial therapy, significantly improving progression-free survival and objective response rate and demonstrating a tolerable safety profile in women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer.

2018 EvidenceUpdates

126. Randomized Phase II Trial of Fulvestrant Plus Everolimus or Placebo in Postmenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Resistant to Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy: Results of PrE Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomized Phase II Trial of Fulvestrant Plus Everolimus or Placebo in Postmenopausal Women With Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Resistant to Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy: Results of PrE Purpose The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus targets aberrant signaling through the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a mechanism of resistance to anti-estrogen therapy in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast (...) cancer. We hypothesized that everolimus plus the selective ER downregulator fulvestrant would be more efficacious than fulvestrant alone in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer resistant to aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. Patients and Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II study included 131 postmenopausal women with ER-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative, AI-resistant metastatic breast cancer randomly assigned to fulvestrant (500 mg days 1

2018 EvidenceUpdates

127. Guidelines for the Clinical and Operational Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

medicines 230 Importation of drug-resistant tuberculosis medicines 231 Storage and distribution in-country 231 Rational use 231 References 232 Appendices 233 CONTENTS viiAbbreviations 2LI second-line injectable drug AFB acid-fast bacillus Am amikacin Amx/Clv amoxicillin/clavulanate ART antiretroviral therapy ARV antiretroviral (drug) ATS American Thoracic Society AUC24 area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h BTS British Thoracic Society CD4 cells CD4+T lymphocytes Cf clofazimine Cfx cipro (...) . It was seen following the introduction of widespread anti- microbial use in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and served as a basis for the development of multidrug therapy for TB by Crofton and his colleagues in Edinburgh. When investigators introduced new drugs for treatment of TB as they were developed, they found that the bacterial populations selected by the treatment were resistant to the medications that had previously been used. Whereas the initial appearance of drug resistance is a ‘man-made’ phe

2013 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

128. Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection

approaches to HIV prevention to achieve maximum impact on reducing HIV transmission and acquisition. ART (ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY) ARV (antiretroviral) drugs refer to the medicines themselves and not to their use. ART refers to the use of a combination of three or more Ar V drugs to achieve viral suppression. This generally refers to lifelong treatment. Synonyms are combination Ar T and highly active Ar T. ART for prevention is used to describe the HIV prevention benefits of A r T. Eligible for ART refers (...) Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: r ecommendations for a public health approach June 2013. 1.HIV infections – drug therapy. 2.HIV infections – prevention and control. 3.Anti-r etroviral agents – therapeutic use. 4.Guideline. I.World Health Organization. ISBN 978 92 4 150572 7 (NLM classification: WC 503.2) © World Health Organization 2013 All rights reserved. Publications of the World Health

2013 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

129. Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to hyper IgD syndrome and response to IL-1 blockage therapy. (Abstract)

Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to hyper IgD syndrome and response to IL-1 blockage therapy. A 62-year-old woman with a history of genetically confirmed hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) was admitted because of chronic diarrhoea. During admission she developed a rapidly progressive nephrotic syndrome. Reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis was confirmed after colonic and renal biopsy which showed deposition of amyloid. After initial treatment with high-dosed (...) corticosteroids, therapy was switched to anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, but her symptoms persisted. After cessation of anakinra, a marked exacerbation of the intestinal symptoms was noted. Nine months after the initial diagnosis of reactive amyloidosis without any amelioration of the symptoms and a decreasing quality of life, our patient declined further treatment and died soon after. This case demonstrates that AA amyloidosis does occur in patients with HIDS and can present with intestinal symptoms

2016 Netherlands Journal of Medicine

130. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Sup... : Critical Care Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me on this computer Register for a free account (...) my selection doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000001525 Special Article Free Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text. 1 Nutrition Support Specialist, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO. 2 Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY. 3 Chief Division of General Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR. 4 Critical Care Dietitian, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR. 5 Clinical Nurse Specialist: Wound, Skin, Ostomy, UW Health University

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

131. Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Volume 40 Issue 8 Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition pages: 1200-1200 First Published online: September 15, 2016 Corresponding Author E-mail address: Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky Beth Taylor and Steven McClave are co–first authors of this article. Stephen A. McClave, MD (...) , Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY. Email: Charlene Compher, RD, PhD, Professor of Nutrition Science, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Email: Nutrition Support Specialist, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri Beth Taylor and Steven McClave are co–first authors of this article. Chief Division of General Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon Critical Care Dietitian, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

132. Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications Full Text available with Trip Pro

, mural, infection, diagnosis, bacteremia, case definition, epidemiology, risks, demographics, injection drug use, echocardiography, microbiology, culture-negative, therapy, antibiotic, antifungal, antimicrobial, antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug effects, drug monitoring, outcome, meta-analysis, complications, abscess, heart failure, embolic events, stroke, conduction abnormalities, survival, pathogens, organisms, treatment, surgery, indications, valve replacement, valve repair, ambulatory care (...) events during first 2 wk of antimicrobial therapy Increase in vegetation size despite appropriate antimicrobial therapy Valvular dysfunction Acute aortic or mitral insufficiency with signs of ventricular failure Heart failure unresponsive to medical therapy Valve perforation or rupture Perivalvular extension Valvular dehiscence, rupture, or fistula New heart block Large abscess or extension of abscess despite appropriate antimicrobial therapy See text for a more complete discussion of indications

2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America

133. Monitoring of Nonsteroidal Immunosuppressive Drugs in Patients With Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Recipients

/ by David Kinnison on 11/09/2012e4S Immunosuppressive Drugs in Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Patients disease and for lung transplant recipients. Early rec- ognition of conditions that require immunosuppressive therapy and prompt administration of immunosup- pressive agents can prevent or minimize tissue injury and prevent irreversible decline in organ function. Because these medications can be harmful, timely detection and remediation of clinically signi? cant side effects can improve the bene? t (...) Monitoring of Nonsteroidal Immunosuppressive Drugs in Patients With Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Recipients CHEST Evidence-Based Medicine journal.publications.chestnet.org CHEST / 142 / 5 / NOVEMBER 2012 e1S 3.1 Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor- a (TNF- a ) Agents Objectives: Immunosuppressive pharmacologic agents prescribed to patients with diffuse inter- stitial and in? ammatory lung disease and lung transplant recipients are associated with poten- tial risks for adverse reactions. Strategies

2012 American College of Chest Physicians

134. CRACKCast E144 – High Altitude Medicine

oxygen at rest and with mild exercise. Re-ascent with pulmonary vasodilator medication may be considered. Other prevention therapies: PDE5 inhibitors Dexamethasone Salmeterol Acetazolamide (to help with acclimatization, prevent HAPE, and reduce pulmonary vasoconstriction) [8] How do you treat HACE? HACE is the least common but most severe form of high-altitude illness. Death from HACE at as low as 2500m is reported, although most cases occur above 3000m. Mild AMS can progress to severe HACE with coma (...) volume and pressure, which may play an additional role in its therapeutic effect. In addition, it has positive effects beyond its role as a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, with beneficial chemoreceptor effects on ventilatory drive, alterations of cerebral blood flow, relaxation of smooth muscles, and upregulation of fluid resorption in the lungs. Adverse reactions: Paresthesias Polyuria Nausea Diarrhea Drowsiness Tinnitus Myopia Change of taste in foods Sulfa medication cross reactivity WiseCracks [1

2018 CandiEM

135. Dysmenorrhoea: How should I assess for a secondary cause of dysmenorrhoea?

Dysmenorrhoea: How should I assess for a secondary cause of dysmenorrhoea? Assessment | Diagnosis | Dysmenorrhoea | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Assessment Dysmenorrhoea: How should I assess for a secondary cause of dysmenorrhoea? Last revised in November 2018 How should I assess for a secondary cause of dysmenorrhoea? of dysmenorrhoea must be excluded before considering a diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhoea. To assess for a s econdary cause of dysmenorrhoea: Take a history. Ask about: When (...) the symptoms started in relation to the menarche. Characteristics of the pain, including type of pain, timing and duration, severity, and exacerbating and alleviating factors. Any associated symptoms, including other gynaecological symptoms and non-gynaecological symptoms. Menstrual history, including length of menstrual cycle, regularity, and duration, and the volume of menstrual flow. for primary dysmenorrhoea, such as family history of dysmenorrhoea. Medical history, past and present. Several conditions

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

136. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea using titrated ondansetron (TRITON): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

ondansetron (dose titrated up to 24 mg daily) or placebo for 12 weeks. Throughout the trial, participants will record their worst abdominal pain, worst urgency, stool frequency, and stool consistency on a daily basis. The primary endpoint is the proportion of "responders" in each group, using Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations. Secondary endpoints include pain intensity, stool consistency, frequency, and urgency. Mood and quality of life will also be assessed. Mechanistic assessments (...) Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea using titrated ondansetron (TRITON): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D) affects up to 4% of the general population. Symptoms include frequent, loose, or watery stools with associated urgency, resulting in marked reduction of quality of life and loss of work productivity. Ondansetron, a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, has had an excellent safety record for over 20 years as an antiemetic

2019 Trials Controlled trial quality: predicted high

137. Evaluating respiratory cryptosporidiosis in pediatric diarrheal disease: protocol for a prospective, observational study in Malawi. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evaluating respiratory cryptosporidiosis in pediatric diarrheal disease: protocol for a prospective, observational study in Malawi. Cryptosporidium is among the most common causes of severe diarrhea in African children 0-23 months old. It is associated with excess mortality, stunting and malnutrition. The most common manifestation of cryptosporidium is intestinal diarrheal disease. However, respiratory cryptosporidiosis has been documented in up to a third of children presenting with diarrhea (...) . It is unclear whether respiratory involvement is a transient phenomenon or a reservoir for gastrointestinal (GI) disease. This study aims to evaluate the role of respiratory cryptosporidiosis in pediatric diarrheal disease.This is a prospective, observational study conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) in Blantyre, Malawi. Young children aged 2-24 months hospitalized with diarrhea will be enrolled. Enrolled children will have induced sputum, nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and stool samples

2019 BMC Infectious Diseases

138. A prospective, interventional, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Bacillus coagulans LBSC in the treatment of acute diarrhea with abdominal discomfort. (Abstract)

of abdominal pain, time to complete resolution of abdominal discomfort, complete remission of diarrhea, and quality of life (QoL). The secondary outcomes were physical examination and vitals, hematological analysis, and assessment of reported adverse events (AEs) or serious adverse events (SAEs).Trial data showed that the LAB was well-tolerated by participants at the dose provided. The LAB was effective in recovering from acute diarrhea with abdominal pain and discomforts and exhibited improved cluster (...) of QoL. No AEs or SAEs were reported during the trial.It is evident that the test drug, i.e., LAB (B. coagulans strain LBSC) is safe and effective for improving the pathophysiological conditions related to acute diarrhea and abdominal discomfort evaluated through stage-II clinical trial.

2019 European journal of clinical pharmacology Controlled trial quality: predicted high

139. Patterns of occurrence and implications of neratinib-associated diarrhea in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer: analyses from the randomized phase III ExteNET trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

-controlled, randomized phase III trial involving community-based and academic institutions in 40 countries. Women with HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer with prior standard primary therapy and trastuzumab-based (neo)adjuvant therapy were randomized to neratinib 240 mg/day or placebo for 12 months. Safety, a secondary outcome, was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria version 3.0. Health-related quality of life by diarrhea grade was assessed using Functional (...) Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B).Two thousand eight hundred sixteen women (1408 per group) were safety-evaluable. Grade 3 and 4 diarrhea occurred in 561 (39.8%) and 1 (0.1%) patients with neratinib versus 23 (1.6%) and 0 patients with placebo, respectively. In the neratinib group, 28.6% of patients had grade 3 events during month 1 decreasing to ≤ 6% after month 3. The median cumulative duration of grade 3/4 diarrhea with neratinib was 5 days (interquartile range, 2-9). Serious diarrheal

2019 Breast cancer research : BCR Controlled trial quality: predicted high

140. Study to Compare the Bioavailability (Amount of Drug Reaching the Blood) of Omeprazole 20 mg Before and After Undergoing Surgery for Morbid Obesity

Title: Bioavailability Study of Omeprazole (20 mg) at Steady State (Multiple Dose) in Patients Who Have Undergone Bariatric Surgery Actual Study Start Date : October 31, 2014 Actual Primary Completion Date : December 23, 2015 Actual Study Completion Date : February 29, 2016 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment omeprazole omeprazole 20 mg Drug: Omeprazole 20mg Outcome Measures Go to Primary (...) examination and laboratory analysis before inclusion in the study. Exclusion Criteria: Any postoperative complication that interferes with the regular intake of medication such as stenosis of anastomotic, fistula, persistent vomiting, diarrhea (> 4 stools per day), evidence of protein malnutrition (albumin <3.5 g / l). High consumption of stimulating beverages (equivalent to 400 mg of caffeine per day, a cup of coffee contains approximately 100 mg of caffeine). Consumption of any medication that may

2017 Clinical Trials

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