How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

7,238 results for

Diarrhea Secondary to Medications

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

7221. Nitazoxanide for the Treatment of Chronic Diarrhea in HIV Infected Children

Nitazoxanide for the Treatment of Chronic Diarrhea in HIV Infected Children Nitazoxanide for the Treatment of Chronic Diarrhea in HIV Infected Children - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . Nitazoxanide for the Treatment of Chronic Diarrhea in HIV Infected Children The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00055107 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : February 20, 2003 Last Update Posted : February 16, 2012 Sponsor: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID

2003 Clinical Trials

7222. Impact of Home Zinc Treatment for Acute Diarrhea in Children

for Acute Diarrhea in Children The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00530829 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : September 18, 2007 Last Update Posted : March 9, 2010 Sponsor: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Collaborators: Kenya Medical Research Institute International (...) . The primary outcome will be a comparison of the prevalence of diarrhea in home zinc versus nonhome zinc villages. Secondary outcomes will be the incidence of repeat episodes of diarrhea, the duration of diarrheal illness, the prevalence of acute respiratory infection, and the effect of malaria infection on treatment with zinc. Thirty-three villages (approximately 1300 children) will be enrolled and children will be followed for 1 year. Significance of results. If this study shows zinc given at home

2007 Clinical Trials

7223. PAR-101/OPT-80 Versus Vancomycin for the Treatment of Clostridium Difficile-Associated Diarrhea (CDAD)

after completion of the course of study medication. Secondary Outcome Measures : Recurrence [ Time Frame: Study days 11-40 ] Percentage of subjects with the re-establishment of diarrhea to an extent(based on frequency of passed unformed stools) that was greater than that noted on the last day of study medication, and the demonstration of either toxin A or B or both of C. difficile, and retreatment with CDI anti-infective therapy was needed. Global Cure [ Time Frame: End of Study ] Achieving a cure (...) PAR-101/OPT-80 Versus Vancomycin for the Treatment of Clostridium Difficile-Associated Diarrhea (CDAD) PAR-101/OPT-80 Versus Vancomycin for the Treatment of Clostridium Difficile-Associated Diarrhea (CDAD) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please

2007 Clinical Trials

7224. Preventing Antibiotic-Associated DiarRhea Using Erceflora

] Secondary Outcome Measures : Reduction in the number of antibiotic-associated diarrhea events per day [ Time Frame: From baseline to end of treatment ] Reduction in the severity of diarrhea events [ Time Frame: From baseline to end of treatment ] Reduction in Gastrointestinal-related symptoms (nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain)over-all reduction in the number of hospitalization days beween control and treatment groups. [ Time Frame: From baseline to end of treatment ] Reduction in C. dificille (...) Investigators Layout table for investigator information Study Director: Paz Figueroa Sanofi More Information Go to Layout table for additonal information Responsible Party: Medical Affairs Study Director, sanofi-aventis ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Other Study ID Numbers: ENTER_L_01125 First Posted: March 14, 2007 Last Update Posted: September 5, 2008 Last Verified: September 2008 Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Diarrhea Diarrhea, Infantile Signs and Symptoms, Digestive Signs

2007 Clinical Trials

7225. A Study of the Absorption of GT267-004 in Patients With Clostridium Difficile-Associated Diarrhea

Sponsor: Genzyme, a Sanofi Company Information provided by: Sanofi Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Approximately 24 patients will be entered into this study taking place in Canada. The aim of this study is to determine if an investigational drug is absorbed (taken up) in patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). The investigational drug will be given in addition to current standard antibiotic treatment so that all patients will receive active medication. All study (...) related care is provided including doctor visits, physical exams, laboratory tests, and study medication. The total length of participation is approximately 7 days. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Pseudomembranous Colitis Clostridium Difficile Diarrhea Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea Drug: tolevamer potassium-sodium (GT267-004) Phase 2 Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 24 participants Allocation

2006 Clinical Trials

7226. Safety and Efficacy of Prulifloxacin Versus Placebo in Traveler's Diarrhea

Industrialized Country; Capable of giving Informed Consent Exclusion Criteria: Fever (>100.3 degrees); Pregnant or Breast Feeding or Not using adequate birth control; Known or Suspected (co-)Infection with non-bacterial pathogen; Symptoms of Gastroenteritis of >72 hours; Bloody Diarrhea; Concomitant antibacterial with activity against enteric bacterial pathogens; History of IBD; Unable/Unwilling to comply with study protocol; > 2 doses of anti-diarrheal medication within 24 hours; Antimicrobial Treatment (...) Safety and Efficacy of Prulifloxacin Versus Placebo in Traveler's Diarrhea Safety and Efficacy of Prulifloxacin Versus Placebo in Traveler's Diarrhea - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Safety

2006 Clinical Trials

7227. Azithromycin, With or Without Loperamide, to Treat Travelers' Diarrhea

Azithromycin, With or Without Loperamide, to Treat Travelers' Diarrhea Azithromycin, With or Without Loperamide, to Treat Travelers' Diarrhea - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Azithromycin (...) , With or Without Loperamide, to Treat Travelers' Diarrhea The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00359970 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : August 3, 2006 Last Update Posted : June 19, 2015 Sponsor: The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston Information provided by (Responsible

2006 Clinical Trials

7228. Probiotic Prophylaxis for Immunosuppressant Associated Diarrhea (IAD) Following Kidney Transplantation

, 2011 Sponsor: Swedish Medical Center Collaborator: Hoffmann-La Roche Information provided by: Swedish Medical Center Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: We hypothesize that the administration of a combination of high numbers of probiotic bacteria will maintain normal bowel function and significantly moderate or obviate Immunosuppression Associated Diarrhea following kidney transplantation. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Immunosuppressant Associated Diarrhea Drug (...) transplantation, utilizing a daily questionnaire, stool cultures and C. Difficile. [ Time Frame: 5 months ] Secondary Outcome Measures : Determine the impact of IAD on therapeutic drug levels. Taper or change of immunosuppressive medications due to IAD. [ Time Frame: 5 months ] Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study

2006 Clinical Trials

7229. Effectiveness and appropriateness of empiric metronidazole for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. (PubMed)

. Eighteen (25%) were subsequently proven to have CDAD; two (3%) had laxative-induced diarrhea; two (3%) had diarrhea secondary to a medication (colchicine [one] and nelfinavir [one]); one (1%) had diarrhea caused by bowel preparation for colonoscopy. The remaining 49 (68%) did not have a clearly established diarrhea etiology. (Four did not undergo stool examination.) Statistical analysis (chi(2) test) demonstrated a significant decrease in symptoms for metronidazole-treated patients with CDAD versus (...) in two community teaching hospitals receiving metronidazole for empiric treatment of presumptive CDAD. A database including antibiotic usage, fever, white blood cell count, feeding formula usage, comorbidity, and response to therapy was maintained.Seventy-one patients on the medical (50), surgical (18), obstetric (two), and trauma (one) service were identified. Sixty-two had nosocomial diarrhea; nine had diarrhea on admission. Seventy (97%) received antibiotics; one (3%) was on nelfinavir only

2003 American Journal of Gastroenterology

7230. Knowledge and use of secondary contraception among patients requesting termination of pregnancy. (PubMed)

no medical advice. There was a range of knowledge of postcoital contraceptive methods. Knowledge of how to deal with forgotten pills, severe vomiting, severe diarrhea, and concurrent antibiotic treatment among the 422 patients who had ever used the combined pill also was variable. 19% of the 372 patients treated by general practitioners knew 4 correct answers, but 50% of the 50 patients in community family planning clinics answered correctly 4 times. Differences could not be explained by other (...) Knowledge and use of secondary contraception among patients requesting termination of pregnancy. 8461770 1993 05 05 2008 11 20 0959-8138 306 6877 1993 Feb 27 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Knowledge and use of secondary contraception among patients requesting termination of pregnancy. 556-7 Bromham D R DR Fertility Control Unit, St James's University Hospital, Leeds. Cartmill R S RS eng Journal Article England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 0 Contraceptives, Postcoital AIM IM J BMJ. 1993 Apr 3;306(6882

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1993 BMJ : British Medical Journal

7231. Vancomycin vs. Metronidazole in C. difficile Diarrhea: Vancomycin vs. metronidazole in C. difficile

. 98% (P=0.36) Severe disease: 76% vs. 97% (P=0.02; NNT 5) All: 84% vs. 97% (P=0.006; NNT 8) Relapse (recurrence of diarrhea by day 21 after initial cure) Mild disease: 8% vs. 5% (P=0.67) Severe disease: 21% vs. 10% (P=0.30) All: 14% vs. 7% (P=0.27) Secondary Outcomes Intolerance One patient from each group developed nausea/vomiting and was changed to the opposite group; both individuals achieved cure. Criticisms Performed before the NAP1/BI/027 strain emerged in the US Funding Sources (...) Vancomycin vs. Metronidazole in C. difficile Diarrhea: Vancomycin vs. metronidazole in C. difficile Vancomycin vs. Metronidazole in C. difficile Diarrhea - Wiki Journal Club Vancomycin vs. Metronidazole in C. difficile Diarrhea From Wiki Journal Club Jump to: , Zar FA, et al. "A comparison of vancomycin and metronidazole for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, stratified by disease severity". Clinical Infectious Diseases . 2007. 45(3):302-7. • • Contents Clinical

2007 Wiki Journal Club

7232. Octreotide in Preventing Diarrhea in Patients Who Are Undergoing Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis

to Primary Outcome Measures : Reduction of diarrhea as measured by NCI CTC version 2.0 weekly during pelvic radiotherapy [ Time Frame: Up to 2 years ] Secondary Outcome Measures : Reduction of patient-reported bowel dysfunction as assessed by the bowel function questionnaire weekly during radiotherapy, weekly for 4 weeks after radiotherapy, and 12 and 24 months after completion of radiotherapy [ Time Frame: Up to 2 years ] Toxicity as assessed by NCI CTC version 2.0 weekly during pelvic radiotherapy (...) Octreotide in Preventing Diarrhea in Patients Who Are Undergoing Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis Octreotide in Preventing Diarrhea in Patients Who Are Undergoing Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one

2002 Clinical Trials

7233. Treatment of severe diarrhea caused by Cryptosporidium parvum with oral bovine immunoglobulin concentrate in patients with AIDS. (PubMed)

opportunistic infection (n = 4), and (3) idiopathic AIDS enteropathy with no identified source of infection (n = 3) or an untreatable opportunistic infection other than C. parvum (n = 1). All patients were treated with bovine immunoglobulin concentrate for 21 consecutive days. Patients in cohort 1 were randomized to receive the medication in powder or capsule forms, whereas all patients in cohorts 2 and 3 received the powder form. The primary end point was change in mean daily stool weight. Secondary end (...) movements per day at study entry, to 5.4 +/- 0.7 during treatment (p = 0.04), and 5.4 +/- 0.9 during observation (p = 0.12). Patients who received bovine immunoglobulin concentrate in capsule form and patients without C. parvum (cohort 3) showed no improvement. No serious side effects were observed, and the medication was well tolerated. Thus, bovine colostrum immunoglobulin concentrate, in powder form, appears promising in the treatment of severe diarrhea caused by C. parvum. The optimal dosage

1996 Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes and human retrovirology : official publication of the International Retrovirology Association

7234. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of a liquid loperamide product versus placebo in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. (PubMed)

diarrhea were enrolled. Children were randomly assigned to treatment with loperamide HCl 0.5 mg/5 mL (n = 130) or placebo (n = 128). The first dose of loperamide consisted of either 1.0 mg (children 2 through 5 years of age) or 2.0 mg (children 6 through 11 years of age) of study medication under the observation of study personnel. This was followed by 1 mg after each unformed stool, with a total daily dose of up to 3.0 mg in the children 2-5 years of age, 4.0 mg in the children 6-8 years of age (...) A multicenter randomized controlled trial of a liquid loperamide product versus placebo in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 48 hours' duration conducted in 13 primary care ambulatory practices in the United States and Mexico was used to compare the efficacy and safety of loperamide with placebo for the treatment of acute diarrhea in children aged 2 through 11 years. Two hundred fifty-eight children with acute nonspecific

1999 Clinical pediatrics

7235. Prophylactic Lactobacillus GG reduces antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children with respiratory infections: a randomized study. (PubMed)

, Staphylococcus aureus, and yeasts) analyses were studied in fecal samples. The metabolic activity of the gut microflora was assessed by analysis of fecal urease, beta-glucosidase, and beta-glucuronidase activities. The primary outcome measure was diarrhea during the first 2 weeks after the beginning of the antimicrobial treatment, because this period most likely reflects the effects of antimicrobial use. Secondary outcome measures were the activities of fecal urease, beta-glucuronidase, and beta (...) Prophylactic Lactobacillus GG reduces antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children with respiratory infections: a randomized study. Antimicrobial treatment may disturb the colonization resistance of gastrointestinal microflora, which may induce clinical symptoms, most commonly diarrhea. The severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea may range from a brief, self-limiting disease to devastating diarrhea with electrolyte disturbances, dehydration, crampy abdominal pain, pseudomembranous colitis

1999 Pediatrics

7236. A Study of Nitazoxanide in Patients With AIDS and Diarrhea Caused by Cryptosporidium

period prior to baseline. Exclusion Criteria Co-existing Condition: Patients with the following symptoms and conditions are excluded: Inability to tolerate oral medications. Life expectancy less than 3 months in the opinion of the investigator. Active CMV colitis, C. difficile colitis, giardiasis, salmonellosis, shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, inflammatory bowel disease, diarrhea secondary to another documented intestinal pathogen, or active or uncontrolled MAC disease, defined as symptomatic MAC (...) Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria Patients must have: Documented HIV infection. Intestinal cryptosporidiosis. Willingness to undergo a 1 week washout phase of all anticryptosporidial medications and stabilization on a protocol directed, antidiarrheal regimen. Greater than or equal to 4 stools per day, on average, for a minimum of 21 out of 28 days prior to study entry, secondary to cryptosporidiosis. AS PER AMENDMENT 2/10/97: Four or more stools per day, on average, during the 5-day screening

1999 Clinical Trials

7237. [Effect of racecadotril in the management of acute diarrhea in infants and children]. (PubMed)

with rehydration alone in children aged three months to three years who had acute diarrhoea and were evaluated in the emergency department (ED). The primary end point was the number of medical exams during the week after starting treatment. Secondary end points were the number of stools during the first 48 hours, the duration of the diarrhoea and the weight on day 7.One hundred and sixty-six children were alternatively randomized to the treated and the control groups. There was no difference for age, degree (...) [Effect of racecadotril in the management of acute diarrhea in infants and children]. The treatment of diarrhoea relies on the maintenance or restoration of hydration with maintenance of an adequate nutritional intake. Racecadotril has been shown to reduce the stools output during acute diarrhoea. The present work was aimed at measuring the number of emergency department visits for acute diarrhoea either the children received racecadotril or not.Racecadotril and rehydration were compared

2002 Archives de pédiatrie : organe officiel de la Sociéte française de pédiatrie

7238. Teaching treatment of mild, acute diarrhea and secondary dehydration to homeless parents. (PubMed)

Teaching treatment of mild, acute diarrhea and secondary dehydration to homeless parents. Homeless people in America are at risk for numerous health hazards. Diarrhea and consequent dehydration commonly affect homeless infants and children. Dehydration, if not treated, can quickly become a medical emergency. If, however, signs of diarrhea and dehydration are recognized and treated early, medical complications may be avoided. Fortunately, some homeless people now have access to shelter (...) facilities that provide health education and services. Education is a fundamental tool in the prevention of disease. For homeless children sick with diarrhea, an educated parent may mean the difference between life and death. Therefore, an educational program was developed to help homeless parents recognize and treat mild, acute diarrhea and secondary dehydration. Participants were urged to treat mild diarrhea at home with oral rehydration therapy, thus preventing expensive medical treatment

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1987 Public Health Reports

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>