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Diabetic Foot Care

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1. A systematic review of the impact of foot-care education on self-efficacy and self-care in diabetic foot disease

A systematic review of the impact of foot-care education on self-efficacy and self-care in diabetic foot disease Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated

2019 PROSPERO

2. The effects of self-efficacy enhancing program on foot self-care behaviour of older adults with diabetes: A randomised controlled trial in elderly care facility, Peninsular Malaysia. (PubMed)

The effects of self-efficacy enhancing program on foot self-care behaviour of older adults with diabetes: A randomised controlled trial in elderly care facility, Peninsular Malaysia. Self-care behaviour is essential in preventing diabetes foot problems. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of health education programs based on the self-efficacy theory on foot self-care behaviour for older adults with diabetes.A randomised controlled trial was conducted for 12 weeks among older adults (...) with diabetes in elderly care facility in Peninsular Malaysia. Six elderly care facility were randomly allocated by an independent person into two groups (intervention and control). The intervention group (three elderly care facility) received a health education program on foot self-care behaviour while the control group (three elderly care facility) received standard care. Participants were assessed at baseline, and at week-4 and week-12 follow-ups. The primary outcome was foot-self-care behaviour. Foot

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2018 PLoS ONE

3. 11. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care: <i>Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2019</i>. (PubMed)

11. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2019. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) "Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes" includes ADA's current clinical practice recommendations and is intended to provide the components of diabetes care, general treatment goals and guidelines, and tools to evaluate quality of care. Members of the ADA Professional Practice Committee, a multidisciplinary expert committee, are responsible for updating (...) the Standards of Care annually, or more frequently as warranted. For a detailed description of ADA standards, statements, and reports, as well as the evidence-grading system for ADA's clinical practice recommendations, please refer to the Standards of Care Introduction Readers who wish to comment on the Standards of Care are invited to do so at professional.diabetes.org/SOC.© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

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2019 Diabetes Care

4. Negative pressure wound therapy for treating foot wounds in people with diabetes mellitus. (PubMed)

Negative pressure wound therapy for treating foot wounds in people with diabetes mellitus. Foot wounds in people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are a common and serious global health issue. People with DM are prone to developing foot ulcers and, if these do not heal, they may also undergo foot amputation surgery resulting in postoperative wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a technology that is currently used widely in wound care. NPWT involves the application of a wound dressing (...) attached to a vacuum suction machine. A carefully controlled negative pressure (or vacuum) sucks wound and tissue fluid away from the treated area into a canister. A clear and current overview of current evidence is required to facilitate decision-making regarding its use.To assess the effects of negative pressure wound therapy compared with standard care or other therapies in the treatment of foot wounds in people with DM in any care setting.In January 2018, for this first update of this review, we

2018 Cochrane

5. Diabetic foot complications

on a structurally abnormal, insensate foot. Ulcers act as a portal of entry for bacterial infections. Preventing and/or healing ulcers helps prevent infections and thereby minimise limb loss risk. Initial evaluation and early management may be by general practitioners; however, there should be a low threshold to refer to a interdisciplinary diabetic foot care clinic or inpatient unit. This is particularly true if there is any loss of sensation or signs of peripheral artery disease. Leg amputation should (...) Diabetic foot complications Diabetic foot complications - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Diabetic foot complications Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Diabetic foot complications, including ulcers and infections, are a common and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. The majority of diabetic foot ulcers are caused by repetitive trauma sustained during activity

2018 BMJ Best Practice

6. The Effect of Telemedicine Follow-up Care on Diabetes-Related Foot Ulcers: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial

The Effect of Telemedicine Follow-up Care on Diabetes-Related Foot Ulcers: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial To evaluate whether telemedicine (TM) follow-up of patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers (DFUs) in primary health care in collaboration with specialist health care was noninferior to standard outpatient care (SOC) for ulcer healing time. Further, we sought to evaluate whether the proportion of amputations, deaths, number of consultations per month, and patient (...) in the proportion of deaths, number of consultations, or patient satisfaction between groups, although the direction of the effect estimates for these clinical outcomes favored the TM group.The results suggest that use of TM technology can be a relevant alternative and supplement to usual care, at least for patients with more superficial ulcers.© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

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2018 EvidenceUpdates

7. Self-efficacy of foot care behaviour of elderly patients with diabetes (PubMed)

Self-efficacy of foot care behaviour of elderly patients with diabetes Elderly patients with diabetes are at a high risk of contracting diabetic foot problems. Self-efficacy is essential to help improve foot care behaviour.To identify levels of self-efficacy and foot care behaviour and their relationship with demographic characteristics in elderly patients with diabetes.A cross-sectional study was conducted in two general hospitals in Malaysia from May to June 2015. Diabetes patients aged 60 (...) -efficacy (β = 0.41, p < 0.001) and gender (β = 0.30, p < 0.001) with foot care behaviour.Self-efficacy can be incorporated in diabetes education to improve foot care behaviour. High-risk patients should be taught proper foot inspection and protection as well as the merits of skin care to prevent the occurrence of diabetic foot problems.

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2017 Malaysian family physician : the official journal of the Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia

8. Operational Delivery of the Multi-Disciplinary Care Pathway for Diabetic Foot Problems

Operational Delivery of the Multi-Disciplinary Care Pathway for Diabetic Foot Problems 1 Operational Delivery of the Multi-Disciplinary Care Pathway for Diabetic Foot Problems April 2016 Joint Specialty Recommendations from: British Orthopaedic Association, British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, Vascular Society, Diabetes UK, Association of British Clinical Diabetologists, Foot in Diabetes UK; British Association of Prosthetists and Orthotists Aim The aim of this document is to provide (...) a framework for the operational delivery of hospital Trust based diabetic foot services, ensuring that patients with acute diabetic foot disease receive the same high quality of care irrespective of where they present. Background (from NG19) Foot complications are common in people with diabetes. It has been estimated that between 5 and 7% of people with diabetes have current or previous foot ulceration 1,2 . Diabetes is the most common cause of non-traumatic limb amputation, with diabetic foot ulcers

2016 British Orthopaedic Association

9. Suspected Osteomyelitis of the Foot in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

):121-132. 22. Lavery LA, Armstrong DG, Peters EJ, Lipsky BA. Probe-to-bone test for diagnosing diabetic foot osteomyelitis: reliable or relic? Diabetes Care. 2007;30(2):270-274. 23. Shone A, Burnside J, Chipchase S, Game F, Jeffcoate W. Probing the validity of the probe-to-bone test in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2006;29(4):945. 24. Grayson ML, Gibbons GW, Balogh K, Levin E, Karchmer AW. Probing to bone in infected pedal ulcers. A clinical sign (...) Suspected Osteomyelitis of the Foot in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Date of origin: 1995 Last review date: 2012 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Suspected Osteomyelitis-Diabetic Patient American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Clinical Condition: Suspected Osteomyelitis of the Foot in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Variant 1: Soft-tissue swelling without neuropathic arthropathy or ulcer. Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* X-ray foot 9 Initial study. Radiographs

2019 American College of Radiology

10. Quantifying the costs and profitability of care for diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting. (PubMed)

Quantifying the costs and profitability of care for diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Increasing Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) stage has previously been shown to be associated with prolonged wound healing time, higher number of surgical procedures, and increased cost of care in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. However, the profitability of this care model is unknown. We aimed to quantify the hospital costs (...) and net margins associated with multidisciplinary DFU care.All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary diabetic limb preservation service (January 2012-June 2016) were enrolled in a prospective database. Inpatient and outpatient costs and net margin (U.S. dollars) were calculated for each wound episode (initial visit until complete wound healing) overall and per day of care according to WIfI classification.A total of 319 wound episodes in 248 patients were captured. Patients required an average

2019 Journal of Vascular Surgery

11. Contribution of 30-day readmissions to the increasing costs of care for the diabetic foot. (PubMed)

Contribution of 30-day readmissions to the increasing costs of care for the diabetic foot. The inpatient cost of care for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) has been estimated to be $1.4 billion annually in the United States. We have previously demonstrated that the risk of 30-day unplanned readmission for patients with DFU is nearly 22%. Our aim was to quantify the cost of readmissions for patients admitted with DFU.All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary diabetic limb preservation service (...) from June 2012 to June 2016 were enrolled in a prospective database. Inpatient costs and net margins were calculated overall and for index admissions vs 30-day unplanned readmissions.A total of 249 admissions for 150 patients were included. Of these, 206 admissions were index admissions and 43 were 30-day readmissions. The most common reason for readmission was the foot wound (49%), followed by a bypass wound (14%), renal complications (9%), and other systemic complications. Surgical interventions

2019 Journal of Vascular Surgery

12. Predictors of major lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients referred for hospital care with diabetic foot syndrome (PubMed)

Predictors of major lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients referred for hospital care with diabetic foot syndrome This study was conducted to determine the risk factors of major lower extremity amputations in type 2 diabetic patients referred for hospital care with diabetic foot syndrome.This retrospective study involved 225 type 2 diabetic patients referred for management of diabetic foot syndrome at King Abdullah University Hospital in the period between January 2014 and December (...) 2015. A structured customized diabetic foot data collection form with diabetic foot characteristics chart was used for documentation of relevant information, which checks for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, duration of diabetes, diabetic control therapy, associated hypertension, cardiac diseases, stroke, chronic renal impairment, renal replacement therapy (hem-dialysis), and history of diabetes-related complication in both feet prior to the study period. The predictors for major lower limb

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2018 Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy

13. Prevalence of diabetic comorbidities and knowledge and practices of foot care among diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study (PubMed)

Prevalence of diabetic comorbidities and knowledge and practices of foot care among diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study Diabetes mellitus with comorbid complications constitute a major public health problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of comorbid complications with glycosylated hemoglobin levels and diabetes duration. Also assessed were patients' diabetic foot-care knowledge and practices.This was a quasiexperimental study. A total of 360 type 2 diabetes (...) mellitus patients were interviewed at a government health care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Diabetic complications and HbA1c-level data were collected from hospital records. A standard questionnaire was used to assess their diabetic foot-care knowledge and practice.Of the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, 32.5% had highly uncontrolled glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (≥8.6%) and 62.8% had had diabetes >10 years. The patients had comorbid complications, such as hypertension (61.4

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2018 Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy

14. Frequency of foot ulcers in people with type 2 diabetes, presenting to specialist diabetes clinic at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. (PubMed)

Frequency of foot ulcers in people with type 2 diabetes, presenting to specialist diabetes clinic at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious limb-threatening complication of diabetes. It is the common cause of hospital admissions and amputations. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) and its association with age, gender, duration of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy (PN), peripheral arterial disease (PAD (...) ) and HbA1c.A total of 1940 people (≥ 30 years of age) with type 2 diabetes coming to the Sakina Institute of Diabetes and Endocrine Research (specialist diabetes clinic) at Shalamar Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan, were recruited over a period of 1 year from January 2016 to January 2017. The foot ulcers were identified according to the University of Texas classification. PN was assessed by biothesiometer and PAD by ankle-brachial index (< 0.9). Body weight, height, body mass index (BMI), HbA1c and duration

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2018 BMC Endocrine Disorders

15. Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers

Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers - Health Quality Ontario (HQO) Let's make our health system healthier Open Menu Quick Links Search Search A A A Evidence to Improve Care Share: Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat (...) of Health and Long-Term Care has provided the following response: Starting in 2017-18 new funding has been provided to the Local Health Integration Networks and to Aboriginal Health Access Centres to provide support for pressure offloading devices for diabetic foot ulcers in the appropriate settings where these devices are accessed by patients. Health Technology Assessment at Health Quality Ontario As part of our core function to promote health care supported by the best available evidence, we use

2017 Health Quality Ontario

16. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

are considered. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: OHTAC Recommendation. May 2017; pp. 1–3 3 REFERENCES (1) Health Quality Ontario. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: a health technology assessment. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser [Internet]. 2017 May;17(5):1-142. Available from: http://www.hqontario.ca/Evidence-to-Improve- Care/Journal-Ontario-Health-Technology-Assessment-Series (2) Canadian Diabetes Association. Diabetes charter backgrounder (...) Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Public Comment: Held October 24 to November 14, 2016. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: OHTAC Recommendation ONTARIO HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION ? The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in healing diabetic foot ulcers. Given the low quality of the available

2017 Health Quality Ontario

17. 10. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care: <i>Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2018</i>. (PubMed)

10. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2018. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) "Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes" includes ADA's current clinical practice recommendations and is intended to provide the components of diabetes care, general treatment goals and guidelines, and tools to evaluate quality of care. Members of the ADA Professional Practice Committee, a multidisciplinary expert committee, are responsible for updating (...) the Standards of Care annually, or more frequently as warranted. For a detailed description of ADA standards, statements, and reports, as well as the evidence-grading system for ADA's clinical practice recommendations, please refer to the Standards of Care Introduction Readers who wish to comment on the Standards of Care are invited to do so at professional.diabetes.org/SOC.© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

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2018 Diabetes Care

18. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system correlates with cost of care for diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting. (PubMed)

The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system correlates with cost of care for diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting. We have previously demonstrated that the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification correlates with wound healing time in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Our aim was to assess whether the charges and costs (...) associated with DFU care increase with higher WIfI stages.All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary diabetic limb preservation service from June 2012 to June 2016 were enrolled in a prospective database. Inpatient and outpatient charges, costs, and total revenue from initial visit until complete wound healing were compared for wounds stratified by WIfI classification.A total of 319 wound episodes in 248 patients were captured, including 31% WIfI stage 1, 16% stage 2, 30% stage 3, and 24% stage 4

2017 Journal of Vascular Surgery

19. The Impact of Three-month Training Programme on Foot Care and Self-efficacy of Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers (PubMed)

The Impact of Three-month Training Programme on Foot Care and Self-efficacy of Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers Patient's self-efficacy in disease management and foot care is considered as an important indicator in controlling the complications of diabetes.This study was aimed to determine the effect of three-month training programme on foot care and self-efficacy of patients with diabetic foot ulcers.A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 60 patients with diabetic foot ulcers in Jiroft (...) Imam Khomeini hospital from January 2016 to May 2016. These patients were randomly divided into intervention and control groups (30 patients in each group). The research instrument was a questionnaire on demographic data, self-efficacy questions for patients with diabetes and a researcher made questionnaire of diabetic foot care. Training programmes for foot ulcers care and prevention of new ulcers formation and other aspects of the disease were implemented during three months in the test group

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2017 Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR

20. Erratum. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care. Sec. 10. In Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2017. Diabetes Care 2017;40(Suppl. 1);S88–S98 (PubMed)

Erratum. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care. Sec. 10. In Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2017. Diabetes Care 2017;40(Suppl. 1);S88–S98 28522554 2018 07 01 1935-5548 40 7 2017 07 Diabetes care Diabetes Care Erratum. Microvascular Complications and Foot Care. Sec. 10. In Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2017 . Diabetes Care 2017;40(Suppl. 1);S88-S98. 986 10.2337/dc17-er07c American Diabetes Association eng Journal Article Published Erratum 2017 05 18 United States Diabetes (...) Care 7805975 0149-5992 Diabetes Care. 2017 Jan;40(Suppl 1):S88-S98 27979897 2017 5 20 6 0 2017 5 20 6 1 2017 5 20 6 0 ppublish 28522554 dc17-er07c 10.2337/dc17-er07c PMC5481974

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2017 Diabetes Care

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