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450 results for

Dermal Filler Injection

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441. ArteFill: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material--summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration trials and a progress report on 4- to 5-year outcomes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

at eight centers in the United States who received injections of ArteFill or bovine collagen dermal filler (control) in 1334 wrinkles of the glabella, nasolabial folds, radial upper lip lines, and corners of the mouth. The efficacy data generated by masked observers using a photographic Facial Fold Assessment Scale demonstrated a significant improvement with ArteFill compared with collagen at 6 months (p < 0.001) in the nasolabial folds. In the ArteFill group, 12-month follow-up was obtained for 111 (...) ArteFill: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material--summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration trials and a progress report on 4- to 5-year outcomes. ArteFill, the successor product to Artecoll, is an injectable wrinkle filler composed of polymethylmethacrylate microspheres and bovine collagen, which offers long-lasting and probably permanent augmentation of wrinkles and skin contour deformities. The pivotal U.S. Food and Drug Administration study consisted of 251 subjects

2006 Plastic and reconstructive surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

442. Artecoll: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material: Report of a controlled, randomized, multicenter clinical trial of 251 subjects. (Abstract)

injections of Artecoll or the currently approved collagen dermal filler (control) in 1334 wrinkles of the glabella, nasolabial fold, radial upper lip lines, and corner-of-the-mouth lines. The treatments were randomized, and follow-up safety, efficacy, investigator success rating, and subject satisfaction rating data were collected at 1, 3, and 6 months. The safety data, measured as adverse events and immunoglobulin G serum levels, were low and similar for both groups. The efficacy data, measured (...) Artecoll: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material: Report of a controlled, randomized, multicenter clinical trial of 251 subjects. Artecoll, an injectable wrinkle filler composed of polymethylmethacrylate microspheres and bovine collagen, is widely available outside the United States. For domestic availability, a multicenter Investigational Device Exemption study was required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This study consisted of 251 subjects at eight centers who received

2004 Plastic and reconstructive surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

443. Facial Cosmetic Filler Injections as Possible Target for Systemic Sarcoidosis in Patients Treated with Interferon for Chronic Hepatitis C: Two Cases. Full Text available with Trip Pro

granuloma at the location of a cosmetic filler injection during combined interferon and ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection. Cosmetic fillers were hyaluronic acid for one patient and probably silicone for the other.Patients with chronic hepatitis C have a higher risk of interferon-induced sarcoidosis. Physicians must be aware of the risk that a granuloma can develop after a dermal filler injection especially in patients treated with interferon for chronic hepatitis C. These reactions (...) may reveal a systemic sarcoidosis. We propose to perform a test for a hepatitis C virus infection before injecting a dermal filler and to inform the patient of this risk in case of a hepatitis C infection that could necessitate an interferon treatment.Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

2008 Dermatology

444. Anatomic location of hyaluronic acid filler material injected into nasolabial fold: a histologic study. (Abstract)

. RESULTS NLF dermal thickness was 1.37+/-0.27 mm (mean+/-SD), with a range of 1.04 to 1.86 mm. All 16 patients showed HA filler localized to the subcutis. In 9/16 tissue samples, some HA was present in the deep dermis, but filler was only observed in more superficial dermis in 1 patient. The thickness of injected filler was 2.11+/-0.63 mm, but filler was often transected at the specimen base. CONCLUSION The predominant localization of injected HA filler is within the subcutis. A relatively thin NLF (...) dermal thickness, typically <1.50 mm, likely precludes accurate injection of filler into dermal collagen. The results suggest that dermal localization of HA filler products is not required for an excellent cosmetic result.

2008 Dermatologic Surgery

445. Surgery for foreign body reactions due to injectable fillers. (Abstract)

and degradation, fillers can be classified as temporary or permanent, organic or inorganic and autologous or heterologous.A plethora of new products has swamped the beauty market since face rejuvenation has become socially acceptable as well as affordable to a wider population, but adverse reactions cannot be excluded. We present 4 patients with complications after injection of facial fillers [including Artecoll(polymethylmethacrylate microspheres), Restylane (hyaluronic acid), DermaLive (hyaluronic acid plus (...) Surgery for foreign body reactions due to injectable fillers. An increasing number of soft tissue fillers have been introduced to the beauty market and these filler substances are widely used as non-toxic, non-immunogenic and relatively harmless injectable alternatives to surgical rejuvenation. Generally, facial fillers are injectable - or surgically insertable - products that are used to fill up the volume loss in the aging face. Depending on bioavailability, chemical composition

2006 Dermatology

446. Novel synthetic dermal fillers based on sodium carboxymethylcellulose: comparison with crosslinked hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers. (Abstract)

Novel synthetic dermal fillers based on sodium carboxymethylcellulose: comparison with crosslinked hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers. The persistence of dermal fillers containing crosslinked hyaluronic acid (XLHA) correlates linearly to the concentration of polymer in solution. For dermal fillers composed of XLHA, a polymer concentration above approximately 25 mg/mL is not practical because it cannot be easily injected through a small-bore needle.Formulating dermal fillers from mixtures (...) have prepared dermal fillers from CMC/PEO polymer blends at concentrations of 20 mg/mL (dermal filler 1), 29 mg/mL (dermal filler 2), 37 mg/mL (dermal filler 3), and 45 mg/mL (dermal filler 4) and measured their rheologic properties compared to commercial XLHA dermal fillers.The data here demonstrate that it is possible to duplicate the rheologic properties of commercial XLHA fillers using CMC/PEO at different polymer concentrations to formulate improved dermal fillers. All of the dermal filler

2007 Dermatologic Surgery

447. Evaluate Efficacy, Safety & Subject Satisfaction of Pain Management With Pliaglis® Cream for Dermal Filler Injections

Evaluate Efficacy, Safety & Subject Satisfaction of Pain Management With Pliaglis® Cream for Dermal Filler Injections Evaluate Efficacy, Safety & Subject Satisfaction of Pain Management With Pliaglis® Cream for Dermal Filler Injections - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Evaluate Efficacy, Safety & Subject Satisfaction of Pain Management With Pliaglis® Cream for Dermal Filler Injections The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00716443 Recruitment Status : Terminated (Sponsor decision

2008 Clinical Trials

448. Effect of injection techniques on the rate of local adverse events in patients implanted with nonanimal hyaluronic acid gel dermal fillers. (Abstract)

Effect of injection techniques on the rate of local adverse events in patients implanted with nonanimal hyaluronic acid gel dermal fillers. One question associated with dermal fillers is whether the rate and variability of local adverse events following treatment are related to injection technique and needle trauma or to the intrinsic chemical composition.The objective was to determine if there is a relationship between dermal filler injection technique and the incidence of local adverse (...) events.A prospective, blinded, controlled study enrolled 283 patients who were randomized to receive midface volume correction of the nasolabial folds and oral commissures with the nonanimal-stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA) gel filler Restylane or Perlane (Medicis Pharmaceutical Corp.). Data were collected on multiple injection technique variables to assess adverse events.Injection techniques that increase the dissection of the subepidermal plane (e.g., fanlike needle use, rapid injection, rapid flow

2008 Dermatologic Surgery Controlled trial quality: uncertain

449. Injection necrosis of the glabella: protocol for prevention and treatment after use of dermal fillers. (Abstract)

Injection necrosis of the glabella: protocol for prevention and treatment after use of dermal fillers. Injection of filler materials into the dermis is well tolerated, with few mild and transient side effects. Injection necrosis is a rare but clinically important potential complication caused by interruption of the vascular supply to the area by compression, injury, and/or obstruction of the vessel(s). The glabella is a particular danger zone for injection necrosis regardless of the type (...) of filler used.We recommend a protocol that may be used to help prevent and treat injection necrosis of the glabella after injection with dermal fillers.Injection necrosis in the glabellar region may be prevented by knowledge of the local anatomy and an understanding of its pathophysiology and treated by a suggested protocol.

2006 Dermatologic Surgery

450. In vivo stimulation of de novo collagen production caused by cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler injections in photodamaged human skin. Full Text available with Trip Pro

In vivo stimulation of de novo collagen production caused by cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler injections in photodamaged human skin. To determine whether endogenous synthesis of new extracellular matrix may contribute to the degree and duration of clinical benefits derived from cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler injections.In vivo biochemical analyses after filler injections.Academic referral center.Eleven healthy volunteers (mean age, 74 years) with photodamaged forearm skin (...) . Interventions Filler and vehicle (isotonic sodium chloride) injected into forearm skin and skin biopsy specimens taken 4 and 13 weeks later.De novo synthesis of collagen, the major structural protein of dermal extracellular matrix, was assessed using immunohistochemical analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and electron microscopy.Compared with controls, immunostaining in skin receiving cross-linked hyaluronic acid injections revealed increased collagen deposition around the filler. Staining

2007 Archives of Dermatology

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