How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

452 results for

Dermal Filler Injection

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

441. The histological aspects of fillers complications. (PubMed)

The histological aspects of fillers complications. The histological aspects of resorbable heterologous fillers (bovine collagen, acid hyaluronique), autologous fillers (lipofilling, dermis-fat graft), biodegradable fillers (New-Fill), and permanent fillers (silicone, Artecoll, Evolution, Aquamid, DermaLive, DermaDeep, Bioplastique, Paraffin) are described. This article relates the morphological aspect of these materials, the normal tissue reaction after injection, and its chronological (...) evolution as the morphological aspects from the different side effects, more frequently observed for the permanent fillers. They mainly consist of granulomatous reactions which may appear long after injection.

2004 Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery

442. Localized granulomatous reaction to a semi-permanent hyaluronic acid and acrylic hydrogel cosmetic filler. (PubMed)

Localized granulomatous reaction to a semi-permanent hyaluronic acid and acrylic hydrogel cosmetic filler. Dermalive, an injectable skin filler composed of a combination of synthetic hyaluronic acid and acrylic hydrogel particles was recently developed for soft tissue augmentation. Dermalive produces longer term results than temporary injectable fillers and is associated with a reportedly low incidence of adverse reactions. We describe a marked local reaction to the injection of Dermalive (...) in the nasolabial fold developing within 4 months with histological confirmation of a granulomatous response. To our knowledge there has been only one previous report of a local granulomatous reaction to Dermalive.

2004 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

443. S-Caineâ„¢ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Skin Filler Injection in the Face

. Information provided by (Responsible Party): ZARS Pharma Inc. Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Injection of dermal filler is used as an aesthetic treatment to fill in unwanted wrinkles and scars. There can be substantial pain associated with dermal filler injections. For this reason, local anesthesia is often used to eliminate or minimize the pain. This anesthesia can be administered by injection or through the use of topical creams and ointments. S-Caine™ Peel (lidocaine 7 (...) % and tetracaine 7% cream) is a eutectic formulation of lidocaine and tetracaine. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if S-Caine Peel is effective in providing topical local dermal anesthesia for dermal filler injections in adults. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Pain Drug: S-Caine™ Peel (lidocaine and tetracaine cream 7%/7%) Drug: Placebo Peel Phase 3 Detailed Description: This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, paired study to evaluate the efficacy of S-Caine

2005 Clinical Trials

444. Artecoll: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material: Report of a controlled, randomized, multicenter clinical trial of 251 subjects. (PubMed)

injections of Artecoll or the currently approved collagen dermal filler (control) in 1334 wrinkles of the glabella, nasolabial fold, radial upper lip lines, and corner-of-the-mouth lines. The treatments were randomized, and follow-up safety, efficacy, investigator success rating, and subject satisfaction rating data were collected at 1, 3, and 6 months. The safety data, measured as adverse events and immunoglobulin G serum levels, were low and similar for both groups. The efficacy data, measured (...) Artecoll: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material: Report of a controlled, randomized, multicenter clinical trial of 251 subjects. Artecoll, an injectable wrinkle filler composed of polymethylmethacrylate microspheres and bovine collagen, is widely available outside the United States. For domestic availability, a multicenter Investigational Device Exemption study was required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This study consisted of 251 subjects at eight centers who received

2004 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

445. ArteFill: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material--summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration trials and a progress report on 4- to 5-year outcomes. (PubMed)

at eight centers in the United States who received injections of ArteFill or bovine collagen dermal filler (control) in 1334 wrinkles of the glabella, nasolabial folds, radial upper lip lines, and corners of the mouth. The efficacy data generated by masked observers using a photographic Facial Fold Assessment Scale demonstrated a significant improvement with ArteFill compared with collagen at 6 months (p < 0.001) in the nasolabial folds. In the ArteFill group, 12-month follow-up was obtained for 111 (...) ArteFill: a long-lasting injectable wrinkle filler material--summary of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration trials and a progress report on 4- to 5-year outcomes. ArteFill, the successor product to Artecoll, is an injectable wrinkle filler composed of polymethylmethacrylate microspheres and bovine collagen, which offers long-lasting and probably permanent augmentation of wrinkles and skin contour deformities. The pivotal U.S. Food and Drug Administration study consisted of 251 subjects

2006 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

446. Surgery for foreign body reactions due to injectable fillers. (PubMed)

and degradation, fillers can be classified as temporary or permanent, organic or inorganic and autologous or heterologous.A plethora of new products has swamped the beauty market since face rejuvenation has become socially acceptable as well as affordable to a wider population, but adverse reactions cannot be excluded. We present 4 patients with complications after injection of facial fillers [including Artecoll(polymethylmethacrylate microspheres), Restylane (hyaluronic acid), DermaLive (hyaluronic acid plus (...) Surgery for foreign body reactions due to injectable fillers. An increasing number of soft tissue fillers have been introduced to the beauty market and these filler substances are widely used as non-toxic, non-immunogenic and relatively harmless injectable alternatives to surgical rejuvenation. Generally, facial fillers are injectable - or surgically insertable - products that are used to fill up the volume loss in the aging face. Depending on bioavailability, chemical composition

2006 Dermatology

447. Clinical Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Sculptraâ„¢ Dermal Filler for the Correction of Contour Deformities Caused by Lipoatrophy

from recurrent systemic infections, those who have a weakened immune system, or certain patients who suffer from cancer or receive chemotherapeutics. In contrast, lipoatrophy can sometimes be present in individuals who are perfectly healthy but have genetically predisposing factors that can contribute to facial emaciation or lipoatrophy. The function of injectable fillers for the treatment of dermal contour deformities is to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These often (...) are both HIV positive and HIV negative. Assess the safety of Scupltra™ dermal filler when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects that are HIV negative. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Lipodystrophy Emaciation Device: Sculptra Injection Phase 4 Detailed Description: Soft tissue fillers are used to temporarily fill facial lines and wrinkles and augment contour deformities. There are a variety of soft tissue fillers available. Sculptra™ has been used

2006 Clinical Trials

448. Long-term efficacy of a novel ribose-cross-linked collagen dermal filler: a histologic and histomorphometric study in an animal model. (PubMed)

Long-term efficacy of a novel ribose-cross-linked collagen dermal filler: a histologic and histomorphometric study in an animal model. Degradation and loss of the three-dimensional shape are the major causes of limited functional longevity of dermal fillers made of natural polymers as collagen and hyaluronic acid.This study assessed the functional longevity of a new ribose-cross-linked collagen filler during 24 months in an animal model.Ribose-cross-linked collagen (Evolence, Colbar Life (...) , that in Zyplast and Zyderm decreased significantly at 12 and 24 months.Ribose-cross-linked collagen is endowed with a higher functional longevity as assessed in an animal model when compared with the most used collagen-based dermal fillers.

2007 Dermatologic Surgery

449. Adverse reactions to dermal fillers: review. (PubMed)

Adverse reactions to dermal fillers: review. For many patients, injectable filling agents offer the promise of facial rejuvenation while offering reduced risks compared with more invasive surgery. With the increase in products available and the rise in the number of patients seeking this type of intervention, it is crucial that both the physician and the patient are fully cognizant of the risks involved with each product.To review the incidences and types of reaction to various commonly used (...) injectable products.A literature review and personal experiences (gained largely in Europe over the past 8 years) of dermal fillers from 1996 to the present, including illustrative case reviews.Reactions can be attributed to the procedure itself, the procedural technique, and the agent injected. Some of these reactions are preventable, whereas others are inevitable; most are mild and transient. Improving product formulations, altering the concentration of product injected, or changing the injection

2005 Dermatologic Surgery

450. Injection necrosis of the glabella: protocol for prevention and treatment after use of dermal fillers. (PubMed)

Injection necrosis of the glabella: protocol for prevention and treatment after use of dermal fillers. Injection of filler materials into the dermis is well tolerated, with few mild and transient side effects. Injection necrosis is a rare but clinically important potential complication caused by interruption of the vascular supply to the area by compression, injury, and/or obstruction of the vessel(s). The glabella is a particular danger zone for injection necrosis regardless of the type (...) of filler used.We recommend a protocol that may be used to help prevent and treat injection necrosis of the glabella after injection with dermal fillers.Injection necrosis in the glabellar region may be prevented by knowledge of the local anatomy and an understanding of its pathophysiology and treated by a suggested protocol.

2006 Dermatologic Surgery

451. In vivo stimulation of de novo collagen production caused by cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler injections in photodamaged human skin. (PubMed)

In vivo stimulation of de novo collagen production caused by cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler injections in photodamaged human skin. To determine whether endogenous synthesis of new extracellular matrix may contribute to the degree and duration of clinical benefits derived from cross-linked hyaluronic acid dermal filler injections.In vivo biochemical analyses after filler injections.Academic referral center.Eleven healthy volunteers (mean age, 74 years) with photodamaged forearm skin (...) . Interventions Filler and vehicle (isotonic sodium chloride) injected into forearm skin and skin biopsy specimens taken 4 and 13 weeks later.De novo synthesis of collagen, the major structural protein of dermal extracellular matrix, was assessed using immunohistochemical analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and electron microscopy.Compared with controls, immunostaining in skin receiving cross-linked hyaluronic acid injections revealed increased collagen deposition around the filler. Staining

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2007 Archives of Dermatology

452. Novel synthetic dermal fillers based on sodium carboxymethylcellulose: comparison with crosslinked hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers. (PubMed)

Novel synthetic dermal fillers based on sodium carboxymethylcellulose: comparison with crosslinked hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers. The persistence of dermal fillers containing crosslinked hyaluronic acid (XLHA) correlates linearly to the concentration of polymer in solution. For dermal fillers composed of XLHA, a polymer concentration above approximately 25 mg/mL is not practical because it cannot be easily injected through a small-bore needle.Formulating dermal fillers from mixtures (...) have prepared dermal fillers from CMC/PEO polymer blends at concentrations of 20 mg/mL (dermal filler 1), 29 mg/mL (dermal filler 2), 37 mg/mL (dermal filler 3), and 45 mg/mL (dermal filler 4) and measured their rheologic properties compared to commercial XLHA dermal fillers.The data here demonstrate that it is possible to duplicate the rheologic properties of commercial XLHA fillers using CMC/PEO at different polymer concentrations to formulate improved dermal fillers. All of the dermal filler

2007 Dermatologic Surgery

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>