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Dermal Filler Injection

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21. Safety and Effectiveness of the Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler VYC-17.5L for Nasolabial Folds: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Study. (PubMed)

Safety and Effectiveness of the Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler VYC-17.5L for Nasolabial Folds: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Study. Juvéderm Vollure XC (VYC-17.5L) belongs to a family of nonanimal hyaluronic acid (HA) gels based on the Vycross technology platform.To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of VYC-17.5L for correction of moderate to severe nasolabial folds (NLFs) compared with a control HA dermal filler.In this double-blind study, 123 adults with 2 moderate or severe NLFs (...) three-quarters of subjects (82%) treated with VYC-17.5L were very satisfied at Month 6. Investigators reported that VYC-17.5L was smoother and more natural looking and easier to inject and mold than control. VYC-17.5L resulted in significantly fewer severe injection site responses than control.VYC-17.5L was safe and effective for correcting moderate to severe NLFs, with results lasting through 6 months in 93% of subjects.

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2018 Dermatologic Surgery

22. Calcium Hydroxylapatite Dermal Filler for Treatment of Dorsal Hand Volume Loss: Results From a 12-Month, Multicenter, Randomized, Blinded Trial. (PubMed)

Calcium Hydroxylapatite Dermal Filler for Treatment of Dorsal Hand Volume Loss: Results From a 12-Month, Multicenter, Randomized, Blinded Trial. Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) microspheres suspended in a carrier gel is an opaque dermal filler that has been used to provide immediate volume correction in the dorsal hands.To assess the safety and effectiveness of CaHA for the correction of volume loss in the hands up to 12 months.This multicenter, controlled, single-blind study (NCT01832090 (...) . Proportions of subjects reporting improvement ranged from 98% (3 months) to 86% (12 months). There were no clinically significant differences between control and CaHA-treated subjects in any hand function measure. Adverse events were generally expected, minor, short-lived, injection-related, and similar to those observed in previous CaHA clinical studies.Treatment with CaHA results in significant improvement in the appearance of the dorsal hand and is well tolerated.

2017 Dermatologic Surgery

23. Late-Onset Inflammatory Response to Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers (PubMed)

Late-Onset Inflammatory Response to Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers Even though injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based fillers are considered safe, rare complications, such as late-onset inflammatory reactions have been reported. Possible causes and effective treatments have not been formally described, so this work aims to discuss these and offer a formal protocol for treatment.This article presents 5 clinical cases of late-onset inflammatory response occurring at least 3 months after uneventful (...) injection of HA dermal filler.Inflammation appeared spontaneously, usually 4-5 months after the last injection, but in 1 patient, almost 14 months later. One patient was injected at the same time with fillers manufactured by 2 different technologies. In this case, all areas treated with the same filler showed diffuse swelling of inflammatory nature, whereas the lips, treated with the second filler brand, remained unaffected. Four patients reported a flu-like illness or gastrointestinal upset a few days

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2017 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

24. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of foreign-body granulomatous reactions to dermal cosmetic fillers (PubMed)

Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of foreign-body granulomatous reactions to dermal cosmetic fillers Foreign body granulomas can develop after the injection of various cosmetic filling materials into the facial area to flatten wrinkles. Clinically, reactive lesions are easily mistaken for soft-tissue neoplasms or cysts. This report presents a case of foreign body granuloma in a 52-year-old female patient complaining of a painless swelling in the nasolabial region. Both clinical

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2017 Imaging Science in Dentistry

25. Preventing the Complications Associated with the Use of Dermal Fillers in Facial Aesthetic Procedures: An Expert Group Consensus Report (PubMed)

these complications. Indeed, a well-trained physician can also minimize the impact of such problems when they do occur.A multidisciplinary group of experts in aesthetic treatments reviewed the main factors associated with the complications that arise when using dermal fillers. A search of English, French and Spanish language articles in PubMed was performed using the terms "complications" OR "soft filler complications" OR "injectable complications" AND "dermal fillers". An initial document was drafted (...) Preventing the Complications Associated with the Use of Dermal Fillers in Facial Aesthetic Procedures: An Expert Group Consensus Report The use of dermal fillers in minimally invasive facial aesthetic procedures has become increasingly popular of late, yet as the indications and the number of procedures performed increase, the number of complications is also likely to increase. Paying special attention to specific patient characteristics and to the technique used can do much to avoid

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2017 Aesthetic plastic surgery

26. Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injections Under the Metatarsal Heads Provide a Significant and Long-Lasting Improvement in Metatarsalgia From Wearing High-Heeled Shoes. (PubMed)

Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injections Under the Metatarsal Heads Provide a Significant and Long-Lasting Improvement in Metatarsalgia From Wearing High-Heeled Shoes. Metatarsalgia is a common overuse injury that may be caused by wearing high-heeled shoes.To evaluate the decrease in metatarsalgia using a hyaluronic acid dermal filler.A 6-month, open study was conducted in 15 subjects with metatarsalgia because of regularly wearing high-heeled shoes. Hyaluronic acid (20 mg/mL) with lidocaine (...) hydrochloride (3 mg/mL) was injected under the metatarsal heads at baseline. Pain (on a 0-10 scale) under the metatarsal heads when walking in high heels was recorded in a weekly subject diary.At 6 months after injections, 5 subjects (33.3%) reported no metatarsalgia pain. For subjects with pain, they were able to wear high heels for significantly longer than before the injections (7.2 hours at 6 months vs 3.4 hours at baseline). Significant improvements from baseline were observed at Month 6 for time

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2018 Dermatologic Surgery

27. Hyperbaric Oxygen for Ischemia due to Injection of Cosmetic Fillers: Case Report and Issues (PubMed)

Hyperbaric Oxygen for Ischemia due to Injection of Cosmetic Fillers: Case Report and Issues Natural and synthetic fillers have revolutionized aesthetic facial rejuvenation and soft-tissue augmentation. We present a case highlighting the dangers of filler self-injection. A 37-year-old woman self-injected a dermal filler around both temples. She immediately experienced left--side hearing loss, blanching over the left face, and pain. Prompt treatment with hyaluronidase, topical nitro paste (...) to be efficacious in these situations by a variety of mechanisms: oxygenation of ischemic tissues, reduction of edema, amelioration of ischemic/reperfusion injury, promotion of angiogenesis and collagen maturation. Her resolved hearing highlights the utility of HBO2 in sudden hearing loss as well. Injectors should have guidelines for using product, not only on patients but staff as well. Filler courses should include handling complications and include HBO2 in their guidelines. Clinicians should remind patients

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2018 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

28. Managing Complications of Submental Artery Involvement after Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injection in Chin Region (PubMed)

Managing Complications of Submental Artery Involvement after Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injection in Chin Region Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers are becoming popular all over the world, but due to the presence of many blood vessels in the face, there is always a small possibility of vascular complications. We present a case with the ischemic involvement of chin and neck skin after accidental submental artery involvement after hyaluronic acid filler injection for chin region. Impending skin necrosis (...) on the chin and upper neck on the right side was diagnosed quickly by observing the skin changes in the immediate postfiller phase. Pain in the mandible and in the muscles during swallowing due to possible ischemia of muscles supplied by submental artery was another crucial diagnostic feature. All parts of the affected zone were treated with high-dose pulsed hyaluronidase protocol using 4 pulses of hyaluronidase injection in first 24 hours after filler injection. Complete resolution of cutaneous ischemic

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2018 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

29. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers (PubMed)

Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection (...) technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand.

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2016 Clinical, cosmetic and investigational dermatology

30. The Use of a Recombinant DNA-based Hyaluronidase to Dissolve Fixed Amounts of Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers

The Use of a Recombinant DNA-based Hyaluronidase to Dissolve Fixed Amounts of Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers The Use of a Recombinant DNA-based Hyaluronidase to Dissolve Fixed Amounts of Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The Use of a Recombinant DNA-based Hyaluronidase to Dissolve Fixed Amounts of Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02654522 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : January 13, 2016 Last

2016 Clinical Trials

31. Long Term Safety and Efficacy Assessment of Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler With for the Treatment of Nasolabial Folds

2016 by Laboratoires Genévrier. Recruitment status was: Recruiting First Posted : March 9, 2016 Last Update Posted : March 9, 2016 Sponsor: Laboratoires Genévrier Information provided by (Responsible Party): Laboratoires Genévrier Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This study evaluates the injection of a hyaluronic acid dermal filler with lidocaine 0.3% in the treatment of nasolabial folds (NLF). Each patient will receive 1 concentration in a NLF (20 mg/mL) and an other (...) treatment session. Has received any dermal filler or other injections, grafting or surgery in either nasolabial fold during the last year. Is pregnant, lactating, or not using acceptable contraception. Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor. Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number

2016 Clinical Trials

32. Combining Microfocused Ultrasound With Botulinum Toxin and Temporary and Semi-Permanent Dermal Fillers: Safety and Current Use. (PubMed)

dermal fillers.A retrospective chart review was performed using subjects who received aesthetic treatments including incobotulinumtoxinA injection, cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid (CPM HA) dermal fillers, and calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) dermal fillers within 6 months of treatment with MFU-V in the same or different anatomic areas.All subjects (N = 101; 96 female; 25-70 year old) received MFU-V, 18% received incobotulinumtoxinA injections, and 81% were treated with CPM HA and/or CaHA (...) Combining Microfocused Ultrasound With Botulinum Toxin and Temporary and Semi-Permanent Dermal Fillers: Safety and Current Use. A microfocused ultrasound system with visualization (MFU-V) is currently indicated for use as a noninvasive dermatological aesthetic treatment to lift the eyebrows, lax submental and neck tissue, and improve lines and wrinkles of the décolleté.To determine the existence of any safety signals when combining MFU-V with botulinum toxin-A and/or semipermanent and temporary

2016 Dermatologic Surgery

33. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Comparing Monophasic Monodensified and Biphasic Nonanimal Stabilized Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers in Treatment of Asian Nasolabial Folds. (PubMed)

A Randomized Clinical Trial of Comparing Monophasic Monodensified and Biphasic Nonanimal Stabilized Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers in Treatment of Asian Nasolabial Folds. Cross-linked hyaluronic acids (HAs) with varying characteristics and formulations are available. Despite the popularity of HA, limited studies compared the effectiveness of monophasic monodensified hyaluronic acid (MMHA) and biphasic nonanimal stabilized hyaluronic acid (BHA) products in correcting nasolabial folds (NLFs (...) similar satisfaction to BHA while requiring less injection volume.

2016 Dermatologic Surgery

34. Etiology, Prevention, and Management of Infectious Complications of Dermal Fillers (PubMed)

Etiology, Prevention, and Management of Infectious Complications of Dermal Fillers The demand for aesthetic augmentation with soft tissue fillers has greatly increased in recent years and has led to an expansion in the number of products available. Unfortunately, an increase in adverse events has followed. These can be categorized into early, late, and delayed. Early infectious complications generally present as a localized skin infection, cellulitis, or abscess. Fillers can also serve (...) as a focus for chronic infection, which is associated with the development of foreign body granulomas, a late complication. Bacterial colonization and indolent infections of the filler site can lead to biofilms that are extremely difficult to treat. Therefore, it is important to focus on prevention through eliciting a thorough patient history including an injection history, practicing sterile technique, and minimizing tissue trauma. Looking forward, much can be done to curtail complication rates. Early

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2016 Seminars in plastic surgery

35. A Cross-sectional Analysis of Adverse Events and Litigation for Injectable Fillers. (PubMed)

A Cross-sectional Analysis of Adverse Events and Litigation for Injectable Fillers. Injectable fillers are increasing in popularity as a noninvasive option to address concerns related to facial aging and volume loss. To our knowledge, there have been no large-scale analyses of adverse events and associated litigation related to filler injections.To determine risks of injectable fillers and analyze factors raised in litigation related to injectable fillers.In this cross-sectional review, the US (...) Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) manufacturer and user facility device experience (MAUDE) database was evaluated for complications from the use of the following fillers: Juvederm, Restylane, Belotero, Sculptra, Radiesse, Artefill, Bellafill, and Juvederm Voluma from 2014 to 2016. The Westlaw Next database was used to identify jury verdicts.Complications were organized by type of filler used, location of injection, and severity. Intra-arterial injections without sequelae and those resulting

2017 JAMA facial plastic surgery

36. A Novel Needle Structure that Can Avoid Intravascular Injection of Any Filler (PubMed)

A Novel Needle Structure that Can Avoid Intravascular Injection of Any Filler With increasing use of dermal fillers, more and more adverse effects are reported. The most devastating one is intravascular injection. We propose a novel needle prototype that allows physicians to prevent intravascular injection.

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2017 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

37. Topographic anatomy of the superior labial artery for dermal filler injection. (PubMed)

Topographic anatomy of the superior labial artery for dermal filler injection. The superior labial artery, which is a branch of the facial artery, supplies the upper lip area. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution pattern of the superior labial artery and provide precise topographic information of the artery for dermal filler injection.Sixty hemifaces from 18 Korean and 18 Thai cadavers were used for this study. The various distribution patterns of the superior labial artery (...) percent), in which the artery is absent. The origin of the superior labial artery was located 12.1 ± 3.1 mm (mean ± SD) lateral and at a variable angle of 42.8 ± 26.9 degrees relative to the mouth corner.The superior labial artery proceeded from the origin of the artery located within a 1.5-cm-side square superolateral to the mouth corner as running along the vermilion border of the upper lip to the facial sagittal midline at a depth of 3 mm. Thus, clinicians should be careful when injecting dermal

2015 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

38. Self injection of dermal filler: an under-diagnosed entity? (PubMed)

Self injection of dermal filler: an under-diagnosed entity? Dermal fillers are increasingly used by clinicians (and nonclinicians) in patients requiring facial rejuvenation, as well as for other aesthetic uses such as treatment of age-related wrinkles, skin folds and depressed scars. We report the case of a patient who injected herself with dermal filler purchased over the internet and who required intervention for the undesired effect. We would like to highlight the ease with which

2014 British Journal of Dermatology

39. Skin extracellular matrix stimulation following injection of a hyaluronic acid-based dermal filler in a rat model. (PubMed)

Skin extracellular matrix stimulation following injection of a hyaluronic acid-based dermal filler in a rat model. Hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers have gained rapid acceptance for treating facial wrinkles and deep tissue folds. Although their space-filling properties are well understood, this study evaluates the cellular and molecular changes in skin, as a secondary effect, following injection of a commercially available, 24-mg/ml, cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based filler (HYC-24L (...) expression levels of collagen types I and III in rat dermal tissue for up to 12 weeks. The ratio of collagen type III to type I protein, however, remained unchanged, suggesting maintenance of collagen homeostasis. A significant increase in dermal elastin after HYC-24L+ injection was also observed. Gene expression analysis confirmed that several genes associated with extracellular matrix production and assembly were also transiently up-regulated, and that these changes temporally preceded those observed

2014 Plastic and reconstructive surgery

40. Vibration anesthesia for the reduction of pain with facial dermal filler injections. (PubMed)

Vibration anesthesia for the reduction of pain with facial dermal filler injections. Vibration anesthesia is an effective pain-reduction technique for facial cosmetic injections. The analgesic effect of this method was tested in this study during facial dermal filler injections. The study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of vibration anesthesia for these facial injections.This prospective study analyzed 41 patients who received dermal filler injections to the nasolabial folds, tear (...) troughs, cheeks, and other facial sites. The injections were administered in a randomly assigned split-face design. One side of the patient's face received vibration together with dermal filler injections, whereas the other side received dermal filler injections alone. The patients completed a posttreatment questionnaire pertaining to injection pain, adverse effects, and preference for vibration with future dermal filler injections.The patients experienced both clinically and statistically significant

2014 Aesthetic plastic surgery

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