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Denver Developmental Screening Test II

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61. Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes and the Growth and Development of Children. (PubMed)

was 64.88. Speech delays were found in three male children evaluated using the Denver Developmental Screening Test II. A statistical association was found between the interval from the surgery to the pregnancy and the outcome of the questionable Denver II test results (p = 0.011).Except for the large index of low birth weight, it can be concluded that pregnancy after bariatric surgery is safe. The growth rate was found to be adequate in the children born after the surgery, with reduced obesity. Although

2015 Obesity Surgery

62. Melatonin use for neuroprotection in perinatal asphyxia: a randomized controlled pilot study. (PubMed)

. Neurologic evaluations and Denver Developmental Screening Test II were performed at 6 months.Compared with healthy neonates, the two HIE groups had increased melatonin, SOD and NO. At enrollment, the two HIE groups did not differ in clinical, laboratory or EEG findings. At 5 days, the melatonin/hypothermia group had greater increase in melatonin (P<0.001) and decline in NO (P<0.001), but less decline in SOD (P=0.004). The melatonin/hypothermia group had fewer seizures on follow-up EEG and less white (...) matter abnormalities on MRI. At 6 months, the melatonin/hypothermia group had improved survival without neurological or developmental abnormalities (P<0.001).Early administration of melatonin to asphyxiated term neonates is feasible and may ameliorate brain injury.

2015 Journal of perinatology : official journal of the California Perinatal Association

63. Trial of Therapeutic Horseback Riding in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

: One month pre-intervention, weekly for 10 weeks during intervention, and one month post intervention, and 6 months post intervention ] Subjects in the THR group will have greater improvement on communication, as measured by blinded speech therapist assessment using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and the Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts, as well as by parent interview utilizing the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II communication subscale, than the control group. Change (...) the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and the Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts, as well as by parent interview utilizing the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II communication subscale. Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research

2014 Clinical Trials

64. Melatonin for Neuroprotection Following Perinatal Asphyxia

] Incidence of abnormal Denver Developmental Screening Test II [ Time Frame: 6 months ] Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Layout table for eligibility information (...) Screening Test II assessments were performed at 6 months. A group of healthy newborns will be used as a control for baseline labs. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 45 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Triple (Participant, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Melatonin for Neuroprotection Following Perinatal Asphyxia Study Start

2014 Clinical Trials

65. Genetics of Skin Cancer

decisions about genetic testing for inherited cancer risk and risk-management strategies. for pathogenic variants in CDKN2A is generally high. Perceived benefits among individuals with a strong family history of melanoma include information about the risk of melanoma for themselves and their children and increased motivation for sun-protective behavior. A number of studies have examined in individuals with a family history of melanoma. Overall, these studies indicate inconsistent adoption (...) and maintenance of these behaviors. Intervention studies have targeted knowledge about melanoma, sun protection, and screening behaviors in family members of melanoma patients, with mixed results. Research is ongoing to better understand and address psychosocial and behavioral issues in high-risk families. Introduction [ Note: Many of the medical and scientific terms used in this summary are found in the . When a linked term is clicked, the definition will appear in a separate window. ] [ Note: A concerted

2012 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

66. Autistic Spectrum Disorders (Overview)

fill out the Autism Screening Checklist can identify children who merit further assessment for possible autism. See the image below for a printable version of the checklist. The significance of answers to individual Autism Screening Checklist items is as follows: Item 1- A "yes" occurs in healthy children and children with some pervasive developmental disorders; a "no" occurs in children with autism, Rett syndrome, and other developmental disorders. Item 2 - A "yes" occurs in healthy children (...) -by-case basis. (See Treatment.) Practice guidelines The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with ASD include the following recommendations: [ , ] Questions about core symptoms of ASD should be a routine part of psychiatric and developmental assessments of young children. If screening reveals significant ASD symptomatology, a thorough evaluation should be performed and possible comorbid diagnoses should

2014 eMedicine.com

67. Status Epilepticus (Diagnosis)

screening and anticonvulsant drug levels Arterial blood gas results Other tests that may be appropriate depending on the clinical setting include the following: Electroencephalography: Criterion standard for diagnosing status epilepticus [ , ] ; however, neurologic consultation is usually required Blood cultures Urinalysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis Imaging studies Imaging modalities used to evaluate status epilepticus may include the following: CT scanning and/or MRI of the brain Chest (...) subdividing it into type I (nonprogressive) and type II (progressive). Type I epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Intermittent, semi-rhythmic, involuntary twitching involving a discrete subset of muscles Most commonly affects the face and ipsilateral distal hand musculature Myoclonus of this variety may evolve into partial or generalized convulsion Type II epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Usually linked with Rasmussen encephalitis Gradual loss

2014 eMedicine.com

68. Focal Status Epilepticus (Diagnosis)

screening and anticonvulsant drug levels Arterial blood gas results Other tests that may be appropriate depending on the clinical setting include the following: Electroencephalography: Criterion standard for diagnosing status epilepticus [ , ] ; however, neurologic consultation is usually required Blood cultures Urinalysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis Imaging studies Imaging modalities used to evaluate status epilepticus may include the following: CT scanning and/or MRI of the brain Chest (...) subdividing it into type I (nonprogressive) and type II (progressive). Type I epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Intermittent, semi-rhythmic, involuntary twitching involving a discrete subset of muscles Most commonly affects the face and ipsilateral distal hand musculature Myoclonus of this variety may evolve into partial or generalized convulsion Type II epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Usually linked with Rasmussen encephalitis Gradual loss

2014 eMedicine.com

69. Focal Status Epilepticus (Overview)

screening and anticonvulsant drug levels Arterial blood gas results Other tests that may be appropriate depending on the clinical setting include the following: Electroencephalography: Criterion standard for diagnosing status epilepticus [ , ] ; however, neurologic consultation is usually required Blood cultures Urinalysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis Imaging studies Imaging modalities used to evaluate status epilepticus may include the following: CT scanning and/or MRI of the brain Chest (...) subdividing it into type I (nonprogressive) and type II (progressive). Type I epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Intermittent, semi-rhythmic, involuntary twitching involving a discrete subset of muscles Most commonly affects the face and ipsilateral distal hand musculature Myoclonus of this variety may evolve into partial or generalized convulsion Type II epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Usually linked with Rasmussen encephalitis Gradual loss

2014 eMedicine.com

70. Status Epilepticus (Overview)

screening and anticonvulsant drug levels Arterial blood gas results Other tests that may be appropriate depending on the clinical setting include the following: Electroencephalography: Criterion standard for diagnosing status epilepticus [ , ] ; however, neurologic consultation is usually required Blood cultures Urinalysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis Imaging studies Imaging modalities used to evaluate status epilepticus may include the following: CT scanning and/or MRI of the brain Chest (...) subdividing it into type I (nonprogressive) and type II (progressive). Type I epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Intermittent, semi-rhythmic, involuntary twitching involving a discrete subset of muscles Most commonly affects the face and ipsilateral distal hand musculature Myoclonus of this variety may evolve into partial or generalized convulsion Type II epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Usually linked with Rasmussen encephalitis Gradual loss

2014 eMedicine.com

71. Cri-du-chat Syndrome (Treatment)

the Denver Developmental Screening Test II. [ ] Next: Surgical Care See the list below: Correction of congenital heart defects may be indicated. Medical problems involving minor malformations such as strabismus and clubfoot may be amenable to surgical correction. Orchiopexy may be necessary in patients with undescended testes. Issues important to anesthetic plan include the following: Anatomical abnormalities of the airway Congenital heart disease Hypotonia Mental retardation Temperature maintenance (...) Previous Next: Consultations See the list below: Clinical geneticist Developmental pediatrician Neurologist Cardiologist Ophthalmologist Dentist Orthopedist Psychologist Physical and occupational therapist Speech language pathologist Audiologist Urologist Previous Next: Diet See the list below: No special diet is required. Previous Next: Activity See the list below: Activities are limited in patients with profound mental retardation and physical limitations. Previous References LeJeune J. [Role

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

72. Status Epilepticus (Diagnosis)

screening and anticonvulsant drug levels Arterial blood gas results Other tests that may be appropriate depending on the clinical setting include the following: Electroencephalography: Criterion standard for diagnosing status epilepticus [ , ] ; however, neurologic consultation is usually required Blood cultures Urinalysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis Imaging studies Imaging modalities used to evaluate status epilepticus may include the following: CT scanning and/or MRI of the brain Chest (...) subdividing it into type I (nonprogressive) and type II (progressive). Type I epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Intermittent, semi-rhythmic, involuntary twitching involving a discrete subset of muscles Most commonly affects the face and ipsilateral distal hand musculature Myoclonus of this variety may evolve into partial or generalized convulsion Type II epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Usually linked with Rasmussen encephalitis Gradual loss

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

73. Status Epilepticus (Overview)

screening and anticonvulsant drug levels Arterial blood gas results Other tests that may be appropriate depending on the clinical setting include the following: Electroencephalography: Criterion standard for diagnosing status epilepticus [ , ] ; however, neurologic consultation is usually required Blood cultures Urinalysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis Imaging studies Imaging modalities used to evaluate status epilepticus may include the following: CT scanning and/or MRI of the brain Chest (...) subdividing it into type I (nonprogressive) and type II (progressive). Type I epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Intermittent, semi-rhythmic, involuntary twitching involving a discrete subset of muscles Most commonly affects the face and ipsilateral distal hand musculature Myoclonus of this variety may evolve into partial or generalized convulsion Type II epilepsy partialis continua features include the following: Usually linked with Rasmussen encephalitis Gradual loss

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

74. Folotyn - pralatrexate

Developmental Therapeutics Program standard procedures. Of the 53 cancer cell lines tested, 36 cell lines (68%) were highly sensitive to the growth inhibitory effect of pralatrexate with GI50’s 30 ml/min might possibly be expected. ? Impaired hepatic function There was no specific study in patients with hepatic impairment. In the non-compartmental co-variate analysis, the laboratory markers Albumin, Bilirubin and Hb were not statistically significant co-variates for pralatrexate clearance. The range (...) function test m 2 square meter MALT mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue mg milligram min minute mL milliliter mos months MTD maximum tolerated dose NCI National Cancer Institute ND not determined NHL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma NK natural killer NSAID nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug NSCLC non-small cell lung cancer OS overall survival PD progressive disease PDCO Paediatric Committee PET positron emission tomography PFS progression-free survival Folotyn CHMP assessment report Rev10.11 Page 7/85 Pgp P

2012 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

75. Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Clinical Practice Guidelines

/University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, jj Department of Pediatrics, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Sciences Center Houston and Shriners Hospital for Children, Houston, TX, USA, # Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO, USA, Department of Pediatrics, University of Naples ‘‘Federico II, ’’ Naples, Italy, {{ Centre for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Shef?eld Children’s Hospital (...) of gastroesophageal re?ux and gastroesophageal re?ux disease in the pediatric population. Conclusions: This document is intended to be used in daily practiceforthedevelopmentoffutureclinicalpracticeguidelines andas a basis forclinical trials. JPGN49:498–547, 2009.Key Words: Clinical practice guidelines—Diagnostic tests— Gastroesophageal re?ux (GER)—Gastroesophageal re?ux disease (GERD)—Therapeutic modalities. # 2009 by European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and North American

2009 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

76. CPG for the Management of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Primary Care

between 8-12 months, between 2-3 years and between 4-5 years old) as part of the monitoring of the healthy child D Health professionals should incorporate a high level of vigilance in the ? elds of social, play, language and behaviour development for the early identi? cation of ASD and related disorders In the monitoring of healthy child development in Primary Care, to help detect any developmental disorder, including ASD, it is recommended the use of scales (such as the Haizea Llevant scale (...) to illness) to consult the parents on concerns regarding their child’s development Professionals can use the items of the PEDS scale to direct questions about parental concerns (Appendix 5) Rating scales of suspected ASD C Population screening for ASDs is not recommended with the instruments developed at thismoment, although the capability of the M-CHAT and the Autonomous Scale is being investigated It has been 5 years since the publication of this Clinical Practice Guideline and it is subject

2009 GuiaSalud

77. A Safety Study of NNZ-2566 in Patients With Fragile X Syndrome

tests, vital signs or ECG, as measured at Screening. QT/QTcF Exclusions (any of the following): QTcF > 450 msec. Three ECGs should be obtained at the time of Screening, 5 minutes apart from each other, and the results should be averaged. History of risk factors for torsade de pointes (e.g. heart failure, clinically significant hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia, or a family of long QT syndrome). A serum potassium at screening <3.0 mmol/L. QT/QTcF prolongation previously or currently controlled (...) with medication, in which normal QT/QTcF intervals could or can only be achieved with medication Current treatment with other medications that have demonstrated QT/QTc prolongation and have this risk described in the Warnings and Precautions section of their Prescribing Information Patients with significant hearing and/or visual impairments that may affect their ability to complete the test procedures. Current treatment with insulin Hgb A1C values outside of the normal reference range at Screening Current

2013 Clinical Trials

78. Behaviors of young children around microwave ovens. (PubMed)

Behaviors of young children around microwave ovens. Scald burn injuries are the leading cause of burn-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations for young children. A portion of these injuries occur when children are removing items from microwave ovens. This study assessed the ability of typically developing children aged 15 months to 5 years to operate, open, and remove the contents from a microwave oven.The Denver Developmental Screening Test II was administered to confirm typical (...) development of the 40 subjects recruited. All children recruited and enrolled in this study showed no developmental delays in any domain in the Denver Developmental Screening Test II. Children were observed for the ability to open both a push and pull microwave oven door, to start the microwave oven, and to remove a cup from the microwave oven.All children aged 4 years were able to open the microwaves, turn on the microwave, and remove the contents. Of the children aged 3 years, 87.5% were able to perform

2011 Journal of Trauma

79. Treatment and recommendations for homeless people with with Otitis Media

in parent’s life that may interfere with adequate attention to infant. • Sleep disturbance – Ask if ear discomfort interrupts child’s sleep (and that of others in the shelter/ household). • Hearing difficulties, delayed speech – Ask when child’s hearing was last screened; elicit information about possible hearing difficulties (trouble listening?) and speech delays (speak as well as peers?). Consider other causes of developmental delay (premature birth, weak parenting skills). • Social development (...) , given the higher cost for equipment and testing, this method may not be available to many clinicians who provide care for homeless children. Spectral gradient acoustic reflectometry (SGAR) can be used as an alternative to tympanometry to confirm an otoscopic diagnosis of middle ear effusion in children aged 2 years and older (Chianese, 2007; Babb, 2004). SGAR offers the advantage of easy portability but may not be available to all clinicians serving homeless children. ? Hearing screening Perform

2008 National Health Care for the Homeless Council

80. Childhood Development

to the effects of psychologic factors, interact with genetic factors to determine the pace and pattern of development. Assessment of development occurs constantly as parents, school personnel, and clinicians evaluate children. Many tools are available for monitoring development more specifically. The Denver Developmental Screening Test II facilitates evaluation in several domains. The scoring sheet indicates the average ages for achieving certain milestones and nicely shows the critical concept of a range (...) Childhood Development Childhood Development - Pediatrics - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test your knowledge Cerebral Palsy (CP) Syndromes

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

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