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Denver Developmental Screening Test II

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1. Denver Developmental Screening Test II

Denver Developmental Screening Test II Denver Developmental Screening Test II Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Denver (...) Developmental Screening Test II Denver Developmental Screening Test II Aka: Denver Developmental Screening Test II , DDST-2 From Related Chapters II. Definition tool completed by clinicians III. Description Revised from original Denver Developmental Test Clinician assess 125 questions Requires 20-30 minutes to perform Available in English and Spanish IV. Efficacy Less class and race bias than original test Improved validity and sensitivity Higher false positive screens than first version : 56-83% : 43-80

2018 FP Notebook

2. Recommendations on screening for developmental delay

, attending to children at risk for or identified with development delay.Guidelines CMAJ 7 Other guidelines The 1994 task force guidelines 15,16 recommended inquiring about and recording the developmental milestones of all children at each well-baby visit. Additionally, these guidelines recommended against use of the Denver Developmental Screen- ing Test to assess asymptomatic children and found insufficient evidence for the use of other screening tests. The Denver Developmental Screening Test (...) against use of the Denver Developmental Screening Test; there was insufficient evidence to support the inclusion or exclusion of other screening instruments. Canadian Paediatric Society (2011) 41 The Canadian Paediatric Society released a position paper supporting an enhanced 18-month well-baby visit. As part of the enhanced 18-month visit, the society recommends that primary care providers in clinical settings incorporate use of an evidence-based health supervision guide, such as the Rourke Baby

2016 CPG Infobase

3. Denver Developmental Screening Test II

Denver Developmental Screening Test II Denver Developmental Screening Test II Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Denver (...) Developmental Screening Test II Denver Developmental Screening Test II Aka: Denver Developmental Screening Test II , DDST-2 From Related Chapters II. Definition tool completed by clinicians III. Description Revised from original Denver Developmental Test Clinician assess 125 questions Requires 20-30 minutes to perform Available in English and Spanish IV. Efficacy Less class and race bias than original test Improved validity and sensitivity Higher false positive screens than first version : 56-83% : 43-80

2015 FP Notebook

4. Trajectories of Early Childhood Developmental Skills and Early Adolescent Psychotic Experiences: Findings from the ALSPAC UK Birth Cohort (PubMed)

in a semi-structured interview to assess PEs at age 12. Child development was measured using parental report at 6, 18, 30, and 42 months of age using a questionnaire of items adapted from the Denver Developmental Screening Test - II. Latent class growth analysis was used to generate trajectories over time for measures of fine and gross motor development, social, and communication skills. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between developmental trajectories in each of these early (...) Trajectories of Early Childhood Developmental Skills and Early Adolescent Psychotic Experiences: Findings from the ALSPAC UK Birth Cohort Objective: The aim of this study was to use prospective data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to examine association between trajectories of early childhood developmental skills and psychotic experiences (PEs) in early adolescence. Method: This study examined data from n = 6790 children from the ALSPAC cohort who participated

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2018 Frontiers in psychology

5. Developmental delays and psychiatric diagnoses are elevated in offspring staying in prisons with their mothers (PubMed)

Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. A psychologist blind to maternal evaluations applied the Denver Developmental Screening Test II (DII-DST). Children/mothers were also evaluated by a child and adolescent psychiatrist via K-SADS-PL. Twenty-four mothers with a mean age of 29.3 years were included. Most common diagnoses in mothers were nicotine abuse (n = 17, 70.8%), specific phobia (n = 8, 33.3%), alcohol abuse (n = 7, 29.2%) and substance abuse (n = 5, 20.8%). Twenty-six children (53.9% female) were (...) Developmental delays and psychiatric diagnoses are elevated in offspring staying in prisons with their mothers The aim of the study was to describe the sociodemographic and clinical features of the mothers and their offspring staying with them in prison. The study was planned as a cross-sectional, single-center study of mothers residing in Tarsus Closed Women's Prison of Turkish Ministry of Justice along with their 0 to 6 years old offspring. Mothers were evaluated via Structured Clinical

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2018 Scientific reports

6. The Validity of the Bayley-III and DDST-II in Preterm Infants With Neurodevelopmental Impairment: A Pilot Study (PubMed)

The Validity of the Bayley-III and DDST-II in Preterm Infants With Neurodevelopmental Impairment: A Pilot Study To identify the usefulness of both the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (Bayley-III) and Denver Developmental Screening Test II (DDST-II) in preterm babies with neurodevelopmental impairment, considering the detection rate as regulation of criteria.Retrospective medical chart reviews which included the Bayley-III and DDST-II, were conducted for 69 preterm (...) babies. Detection rate of neurodevelopmental impairment in preterm babies were investigated by modulating scaled score of the Bayley-III. The detection rate of DDST-II was identified by regarding more than 1 caution as an abnormality. Then detection rates of each corrected age group were verified using conventional criteria.When applying conventional criteria, 22 infants and 35 infants were detected as preterm babies with neurodevelopmental impairment, as per the Bayley-III and DDST-II evaluation

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2017 Annals of rehabilitation medicine

7. Screening preschool children for fine motor skills: environmental influence (PubMed)

Screening preschool children for fine motor skills: environmental influence [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of gender and family factors on performance in the fine motor domain of the Denver II developmental screening test. [Subjects and Methods] Data were obtained from 2038 healthy children, 999 boys (49%) and 1039 girls (51%) in four age groups: 0-24 months (57%), 25-40 months (21.1%), 41-56 months (10.4%), and 57-82 months (11.5%). [Results] Female gender (...) , higher maternal age, especially in children older than 24 months, and higher maternal education were associated with earlier accomplishment of fine motor items. Higher socioeconomic status was correlated with fine motor skills more noticeably at young ages. [Conclusion] The results of this study support the role of environmental factors in the interpretation of fine motor test results and point to target groups for intervention, such as infants in the low socioeconomic group and preschool children

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2016 Journal of physical therapy science

8. Concurrent Validity and Feasibility of Short Tests Currently Used to Measure Early Childhood Development in Large Scale Studies (PubMed)

the feasibility, reliability, and concurrent validity of three multi-dimensional screeners (Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ-3), Denver Developmental Screening Test (Denver-II), Battelle Developmental Inventory screener (BDI-2)) and two single-domain tests (MacArthur-Bates Short-Forms (SFI and SFII), WHO Motor Milestones (WHO-Motor)) in 1,311 children 6-42 months in Bogota, Colombia. The scores were compared with those on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III), taken as the 'gold (...) standard'. The Bayley-III was given at a center by psychologists; whereas the short tests were administered in the home by interviewers, as in a survey setting. Findings indicated good internal validity of all short tests except the ASQ-3. The BDI-2 took long to administer and was expensive, while the single-domain tests were quickest and cheapest and the Denver-II and ASQ-3 were intermediate. Concurrent validity of the multi-dimensional tests' cognitive, language, and fine motor scales

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2016 PloS one

9. Pervasive Developmental Disorder: Autism (Diagnosis)

. [ ] Having parents fill out the Autism Screening Checklist can identify children who merit further assessment for possible autism. See the image below for a printable version of the checklist. The significance of answers to individual Autism Screening Checklist items is as follows: Item 1- A "yes" occurs in healthy children and children with some pervasive developmental disorders; a "no" occurs in children with autism, Rett syndrome, and other developmental disorders. Item 2 - A "yes" occurs in healthy (...) -by-case basis. (See Treatment.) Practice guidelines The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with ASD include the following recommendations: [ , ] Questions about core symptoms of ASD should be a routine part of psychiatric and developmental assessments of young children. If screening reveals significant ASD symptomatology, a thorough evaluation should be performed and possible comorbid diagnoses should

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

10. Pervasive Developmental Disorder: Autism (Follow-up)

of a favorable outcome. Thus, regular screening of infants and toddlers for symptoms and signs of autistic disorder is crucial because it allows for early identification of these patients. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder and unspecified pervasive developmental disorder typically benefit from behaviorally oriented therapeutic programs developed specifically for this population. Autistic children should be placed in these specialized programs as soon as the diagnosis is entertained. Parents, teachers (...) disorder may not benefit from social skills training. [ ] In a 2-year randomized, controlled trial, children who received the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention for improving outcomes of toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, showed significant improvements in IQ, adaptive behavior, and autism diagnosis compared with children who received intervention commonly available in the community. [ ] A follow-up electroencephalographic study showed

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

11. Pervasive Developmental Disorder: Autism (Overview)

. [ ] Having parents fill out the Autism Screening Checklist can identify children who merit further assessment for possible autism. See the image below for a printable version of the checklist. The significance of answers to individual Autism Screening Checklist items is as follows: Item 1- A "yes" occurs in healthy children and children with some pervasive developmental disorders; a "no" occurs in children with autism, Rett syndrome, and other developmental disorders. Item 2 - A "yes" occurs in healthy (...) -by-case basis. (See Treatment.) Practice guidelines The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with ASD include the following recommendations: [ , ] Questions about core symptoms of ASD should be a routine part of psychiatric and developmental assessments of young children. If screening reveals significant ASD symptomatology, a thorough evaluation should be performed and possible comorbid diagnoses should

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

12. Pervasive Developmental Disorder: Autism (Treatment)

of a favorable outcome. Thus, regular screening of infants and toddlers for symptoms and signs of autistic disorder is crucial because it allows for early identification of these patients. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder and unspecified pervasive developmental disorder typically benefit from behaviorally oriented therapeutic programs developed specifically for this population. Autistic children should be placed in these specialized programs as soon as the diagnosis is entertained. Parents, teachers (...) disorder may not benefit from social skills training. [ ] In a 2-year randomized, controlled trial, children who received the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention for improving outcomes of toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, showed significant improvements in IQ, adaptive behavior, and autism diagnosis compared with children who received intervention commonly available in the community. [ ] A follow-up electroencephalographic study showed

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

13. The Foyer model for homeless youth: a systematic mapping review

REFERENCES 44 APPENDIX 46 Appendix 1. Glossary 46 Appendix 2. Search strategy 48 Appendix 3. Screening form 53 Appendix 4. Unavailable references (n=3) 53 4 Content Appendix 5. Non-foyer studies (n=24) 54 5 Hovedbudskap Hovedbudskap Område for helsetjenester i Folkehelseinstituttet ved Seksjon for velferdstjenester fikk i oppdrag av Husbanken å utføre en kart- legging av den empiriske forskningen om Foyer-modellen. Det er en pakkeløsning med bopel og integrerte støtteordninger for unge i alderen 16-24 år (...) . bopel, hjelp til ut- danning, opplæring, jobbsøking og livsferdigheter). De inkluderte studiene hadde ulike forskningsfokus, og vi grupperte dem derfor i tre kategorier: i) tiltaksevalueringer (ni studier), ii) erfaringer med å være i en foyer (seks studier), iii) den siste kategorien (an- net) inkluderte én studie om psykiske helsetjenester i foyers i Storbritannia og én stu- die om den finansielle situasjonen til foyers. De vanligste utfallene i tiltaksevalueringene var bosted, utdanning, arbeid

2018 Norwegian Institute of Public Health

14. School-based interventions for reducing disciplinary school exclusion

in the widest sense. It funds research and innovation in education and social policy and also works to build capacity in education, science and social science research. The Nuffield Foundation has funded this project, but the views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Foundation. More information is available at www.nuffieldfoundation.org ii The Campbell Collaboration | www.campbellcollaboration.org Declarations of interest None of the researchers involved in the team present (...) cases the student is not allowed to come back to the same school (expulsion). The review summarises findings from 37 reports covering nine different types of intervention. Most studies were from the USA, and the remainder from the UK. 7 The Campbell Collaboration | www.campbellcollaboration.org What is this review about? School exclusion is associated with undesirable effects on developmental outcomes. It increases the likelihood of poor academic performance, antisocial behavior, and poor employment

2018 Campbell Collaboration

15. Management of Stroke in Neonates and Children

), factor II (prothrombin) G20210A, and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T are rare in AIS. In fact, experts recently suggested that testing for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase is no longer warranted. Thrombophilia evaluation in the neonate has limited clinical utility because levels of protein C, protein S, antithrombin, and factor XI are normally decreased to 30% of adults levels, and these levels only approach adult levels at various time points during childhood. Thrombophilia testing (...) , no single cause can be identified. Evaluation A recent prospective case-control study on neonates with AIS has suggested that routine thrombophilia testing is not indicated. This study demonstrated that thrombophilic conditions, including decreased levels of protein C, protein S, or antithrombin, increased levels of factor VIII, factor IX, factor XI, fibrinogen, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and anticardiolipin antibodies. The presence of lupus anticoagulant and genotyping of factor V Leiden (FVL

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2019 American Heart Association

16. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

and have less improvement with radiofrequency ablation. Peripheral Artery Disease and Aortic Diseases (Chapter 23) A recent Danish trial in men aged 65 to 74 years reported that screening of peripheral artery disease (with ankle-brachial index), abdominal aortic aneurysm (with abdominal ultrasound), and hypertension followed by optimal care resulted in a 7% lower risk of 5-year mortality compared with no screening. African Americans have a 37% higher amputation risk than white individuals. In adjusted

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2019 American Heart Association

17. Statin Safety and Associated Adverse Events: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Share on Jump to Free Access article , MD, FAHA, Chair , FRCPath, PhD , MD, PhD, FAHA , MD, FAHA, Vice Chair , PharmD, MSPH, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , MD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD, MPH, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , PhD, FAHA , MD, PhD, FAHA Connie B. Newman , David Preiss , Jonathan A. Tobert , Terry A. Jacobson , Robert L. Page II , Larry B. Goldstein , Clifford Chin , Lisa R. Tannock , Michael Miller , Geetha Raghuveer , P. Barton Duell , Eliot A. Brinton , Amy Pollak , Lynne T. Braun , Francine K (...) to the pharmacological properties of the drug. Most clinical trials report the numbers of patients stopping the study medication because of any adverse event. The difference between the test agent and placebo is a good measure of the overall tolerability of the agent, provided that the blind remains secure throughout the trial. 1.2. Randomized Controlled Trials In the evaluation of the safety of a drug used long term, the most reliable data are derived from properly designed and conducted large, long-term, double

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2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

18. The relationship between teacher qualification and the quality of the early childhood care and learning environment

(e.g., African- American and Hispanic) in the US, for example, are more likely to receive lower grades and scores in standardized tests than Caucasian students (Burchinal et al., 2011; Reardon & Galindo, 2009). Poor quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) can be detrimental to the development of children from all backgrounds, particularly if they fail to equalise some of the disparities and disadvantages that children face in the early developmental stages of their lives. Disparities (...) ). When caregivers have higher education levels, children tend to have higher levels of social competence (Clarke- Stewart & Gruber, 1984). Education or training of teachers/caregivers in the ECEC environment is also correlated with higher scores on achievement tests, and higher levels of compliance and cooperation in children (Whitebook, 1989). It is noted, however, that structural indicators of an ECEC program and caregiver characteristics contribute to the overall quality or child developmental

2017 Campbell Collaboration

19. Later school start times for supporting the education, health and well-being of high school students

of sleep, mental health indicators, attendance, or alertness) or secondary outcomes (health behaviors, health and safety indicators, social outcomes, family outcomes, school outcomes, or community outcomes) were eligible. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently determined inclusion and exclusion decisions through screening titles, abstracts, and full-text reports. Two review authors independently extracted data for all eligible studies. We presented findings through (...) on weeknights, whereas those with an earlier start time of 07:20 reported only 6.9 hours (Kowalski 1995). Even a moderate increase in sleep (30 minutes to one hour) over a period of time has shown to be associated with increased scores on various performance tasks (e.g. reaction times and memory tests) for youth; in one study, students who slept longer improved their performance on several measures of neurobehavioral functioning (e.g. digit forward memory test and reaction time) and avoided

2017 Campbell Collaboration

20. Assessment, diagnosis and interventions for autism spectrum disorders

of preventative preschool care, but that formal screening should be confined to the evidence-based programmes agreed by the UK National Screening Committee. 26 Hall 4 does not recommend formal universal screening for speech and language delay, global developmental delay or ASD, but states that staff should elicit and respond to parental concerns as part of child health surveillance. The report emphasises the need for an efficient preliminary assessment, or triage process, to determine which children may need (...) referral for fuller assessment and/or intervention. Identifying adults for assessment is discussed in section 4.1.6. 4.1.2 SCREENING Screening has been defined by the UK National Screening Committee as “a public health service in which members of a defined population, who do not necessarily perceive they are at risk of, or are already affected by a disease or its complications, are asked a question or offered a test, to identify those individuals who are more likely to be helped than harmed by further

2016 SIGN

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