How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

29 results for

Dementia Screening with GPCOG

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Dementia Screening with GPCOG

Dementia Screening with GPCOG Dementia Screening with GPCOG Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Dementia Screening (...) with GPCOG Dementia Screening with GPCOG Aka: Dementia Screening with GPCOG , General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition , GPCOG II. Indications Screening III. Questions: Part 1 Remember Name and Address (first name, last name, street number, street name, city) Say the info and allow patient to repeat it up to 4 times to commit to memory Give the exact date (month, day, year) (1 point) (place 3,6,9, and 12 on clock face) (1 point) Draw clock with two hands showing 11:10 (1 point) Tell me something

2018 FP Notebook

2. Screening for Dementia in Primary Care: A Comparison of the GPCOG and the MMSE. (PubMed)

Screening for Dementia in Primary Care: A Comparison of the GPCOG and the MMSE. The General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) is a brief cognitive test. This study compared the GPCOG to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the most widely used test, in terms of their ability to detect likely dementia in primary care.General practitioners across three states in Australia recruited 2,028 elderly patients from the community. A research nurse administered the GPCOG and the MMSE (...) , as well as the Cambridge Examination for Mental Disorders of the Elderly Cognitive Scale-Revised that we used to define likely dementia.Overall, the GPCOG and the MMSE were similarly effective at detecting likely dementia. The GPCOG, however, had a higher sensitivity than the MMSE when using published cutpoints.The GPCOG is an effective screening tool for dementia in primary care. It appears to be a viable alternative to the MMSE, whilst also requiring less time to administer.© 2016 S. Karger AG

2016 Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders

3. Screening Tools to Identify Adults with Cognitive Impairment Associated with Dementia

screening instruments MMSE 6CIT, AMT, GPCOG, Mini-Cog, MIS, MoCA, and STMS are good alternatives to MMSE Lin, 2013 5 55 studies MMSE Unspecified reference standard Sensitivity = 88.3% Specificity = 86.2 % CDT, Mini-Cog, MIS, AMT, Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, FCSRT, 7MS Limited evidence; generally reasonable performance with ranging sensitivity and specificity. MIS and AMT have low sensitivity. Appels, 2010 6 Secondary care setting Dementia screening instruments with 10 to 45 minute (...) neuropsychological assessment battery; DLB = dementia with Lewy bodies; DSRS = Dementia Severity Rating Scale; FCSRT = Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test; FRS = free recall score; GPCOG = General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition; IQCODE = Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly; MCI = mild cognitive impairment; MIS = Memory Impairment Screen; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination; MoCA = Montreal Cognitive Assessment; NLR = negative likelihood ratio; NPV = negative predictive value

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

4. Dementia Screening with GPCOG

Dementia Screening with GPCOG Dementia Screening with GPCOG Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Dementia Screening (...) with GPCOG Dementia Screening with GPCOG Aka: Dementia Screening with GPCOG , General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition , GPCOG II. Indications Screening III. Questions: Part 1 Remember Name and Address (first name, last name, street number, street name, city) Say the info and allow patient to repeat it up to 4 times to commit to memory Give the exact date (month, day, year) (1 point) (place 3,6,9, and 12 on clock face) (1 point) Draw clock with two hands showing 11:10 (1 point) Tell me something

2015 FP Notebook

5. Cost effectiveness of using cognitive screening tests for detecting dementia and mild cognitive impairment in primary care. (PubMed)

Cost effectiveness of using cognitive screening tests for detecting dementia and mild cognitive impairment in primary care. We estimated the cost effectiveness of different cognitive screening tests for use by General Practitioners (GPs) to detect cognitive impairment in England.A patient-level cost-effectiveness model was developed using a simulated cohort that represents the elderly population in England (65 years and older). Each patient was followed over a lifetime period. Data from (...) published sources were used to populate the model. The costs include government funded health and social care, private social care and informal care. Patient health benefit was measured and valued in Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs).Base-case analyses found that adopting any of the three cognitive tests (Mini-Mental State Examination, 6-Item Cognitive Impairment Test or GPCOG (General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition)) delivered more QALYs for patients over their lifetime and made savings across

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

6. An evaluation of the additional benefit of population screening for dementia beyond a passive case-finding approach. (PubMed)

as "case-finding" (n = 425) or "screening" (n = 1006) based on their answers to four subjective memory related questions or their GP's clinical judgement of their dementia status. Cognitive status of each patient was formally assessed by a research nurse using the Cambridge Cognition Examination (CAMCOG-R). Patients then attended their usual GP for administration of the GP assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) dementia screening instrument, and follow-up care and/or referral as necessary in light (...) of the outcome.The prevalence of dementia was significantly higher in the case-finding group (13.6%) compared to the screening group (4.6%; p < 0.01). The GPCOG had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 61% in the case-finding group and 39% in the screening group; negative predictive value was >95% in both groups. GPs and their patients both found the GPCOG to be an acceptable cognitive assessment tool. The dementia cases missed via case-finding were younger (p = 0.024) and less cognitively impaired (p = 0.020

2016 International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

7. Cognitive screening for dementia in primary care: a systematic review. (PubMed)

Cognitive screening for dementia in primary care: a systematic review. Identifying dementia in primary care could minimize the impact of a late intervention; however, it shows high rates of misdiagnosis. One of the reasons seems to be the lack of knowledge of adequate cognitive screening instruments. This is a systematic review of the available instruments for the primary care context.For this systematic review, articles were collected according to the following combined key terms: "cognitive (...) screening" and "dementia" and "primary care" and "review". Studies should be reviews focusing on cognitive screening instruments best used in primary care setting.Thirteen reviews were selected. In total, it was considered 34 cognitive screening instruments. Half of the instruments can be applied in an adequate time-limit for primary care context. Memory is the most commonly assessed cognitive function (91%). Almost half of the tests are mentioned to have influence of education or cultural factors (44

2014 International psychogeriatrics / IPA

8. Dementia

Examination (MMSE), the 6-item Cognitive Impairment Test (6-CIT), the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG), or the 7-Minute Screen. Take into account factors known to affect performance (such as educational level, prior level of functioning, language, sensory impairment, and physical or mental health problems) when interpreting scores. Cognition in people with learning disabilities, should be assessed by an intellectual disability specialist using a modified cognitive screening tool (...) and an informant-based questionnaire (Step 2) is needed. Step 2 — asks an informant 6 questions comparing how a person is now (in terms of memory, language, and some activities of daily living) with when they were well a few years ago. A score of 0–3 suggests cognitive impairment. The GPCOG is available online at and in the Alzheimer's Society toolkit ' '. 7-Minute Screen (7MS) The 7-Minute screen consists of cognitive tests on: Orientation in time — identification of the time of day, day of the week, month

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. A Systematic Evidence Review of the Signs and Symptoms of Dementia and Brief Cognitive Tests Available in VA

signs and symptoms should prompt V A providers to assess cognitive function as part of an initial diagnostic workup for dementia? 10 Subjective memory complaints 15 Neuropsychiatric symptoms 16 Sleep disturbance 17 Gait disturbance 18 Neurologic signs 18 Miscellaneous 18 Key Question #2: Which measures of cognitive function provide the optimal sensitivity, specificity, and time to completion among the measures available to V A providers? 19 BOMC 26 GPCOG 26 iv A Systematic Evidence Review (...) of dementia signs and symptoms 10 Table 2. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of subjective memory complaints in selected studies 16 Table 3. Pros and cons of the 6 brief mental status measures available for use in V A 20 Table 4. Study characteristics and test performance results for the BOMC, GPCOG, Mini-Cog, MoCA, SLUMS, and STMS 22 Table 5. Cognitive domains, biases, and other characteristics of BOMC, GPCOG, Mini-Cog, MoCA, SLUMS, and STMS 25 a pp Endix a. Search strategy 41 a pp Endix B

2010 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

10. CPG on the comprehensive care of people with Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias

neuroimaging technique of choice in the diagnostic process of dementia and its different types? 34. What are the advantages of EEG/mapping in the diagnosis of dementia? 35. What are the indications for performing a cerebral biopsy in the etiologic diagnosis of dementia? DIFFERENT CARE LEVEL ACTIONS 36. What are the care levels and how are they classi? ed? 37. What role does primary care play in the all-round care of dementia? Must dementia screening be carried out in the general population? What (...) B The use of Lund-Manchester or Neary criteria to help diagnose FTLD is recommended. B Patients with cognitive complaints must be assessed by means of global cognition screen tests, neuropsychological test batteries, short cognitive instruments focused on speci? c aspects of cognition and/or standardised structured questionnaires to quantify the degree of cognitive impairment. A The dementia diagnosis must include a formal objective cognitive assessment with validated instruments. A The use

2010 GuiaSalud

11. Ageing in general practice (AGP) trial: a cluster randomised trial to examine the effectiveness of peer education on GP diagnostic assessment and management of dementia. (PubMed)

identification of differential diagnoses including reversible causes of cognitive impairment; and GP referral to specialists, Alzheimers' Australia and support services. A "case finding" and a "screening" group will be compared and the psychometrics of the GPCOG will be examined.Approximately 2,000 subjects aged 75 years and over will be recruited through approximately 160 GPs, to yield approximately 200 subjects with dementia (reducing to 168 by 24 months).The trial outlined in this paper has been peer (...) with management that is poorly adherent to recommended guidelines. This trial examines the effectiveness of a peer led dementia educational intervention for GPs.The study is a cluster randomised trial, conducted across three states and five sites. All GPs will complete an audit of their consenting patients aged 75 years or more at three time points - baseline, 12 and 24 months. GPs allocated to the intervention group will receive two educational sessions from a peer GP or nurse, and will administer the GPCOG

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2012 BMC family practice

12. Alzheimer?s Disease: State of Diagnosis

, “The GPCOG: a new screening test for dementia designed for general practice.,” J. Am. Geriatr. Soc. , vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 530–534, Mar. 2002. [17] H. Buschke, G. Kuslansky, M. Katz, W. F. Stewart, M. J. Sliwinski, H. M. Eckholdt, and R. B. Lipton, “Screening for dementia with the memory impairment screen.,” Neurology , vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 231–238, Jan. 1999. [18] A. F. Jorm, “A short form of the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE): development and cross-validation (...) of the Plan is to “prevent or effectively treat Alzheimer’s Disease by 2025.” We now have an estimated 5.5 million people who are living with this illness[1] and these numbers are only expected to grow with the aging [2]. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force finds no evidence to recommend widespread dementia screening[3], however the Affordable Care Act requires an annual cognitive assessment for all Medicare enrollees. It is troublesome that, in one study 55% of cases of dementia went unrecognized

2017 Clinical Correlations

13. Delirium

) asking about: The onset, nature, and course of the behaviour change — acute behaviour change (developing over hours or days) which fluctuates is suggestive of delirium. Baseline functional and cognitive state. If possible carry out a cognitive screening test (for example the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition [GPCOG] test) and if available, compare the current score with a previous score to help differentiate acute and chronic cognitive changes — for more information on cognitive screening (...) ) and/or dementia. If cognitive impairment is suspected, confirm it using a standardised and validated cognitive impairment measure. Current hip fracture. Severe illness (a clinical condition that is deteriorating or is at risk of deterioration). Indicators of delirium: at presentation — criterion 2 At presentation, people at risk should be assessed for recent (within hours or days) changes or fluctuations in behaviour. These changes may affect: Cognitive function: for example, worsened concentration, slow

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

14. Safety and quality issues associated with the care of patients with cognitive impairment in acute care settings

experience of these patients while in hospital: • Older patients should be assessed for CI at admission to hospital. This is a key recommendation of the Ministers’ Dementia Advisory Group. 1 The identification of delirium in the ED or at admission to hospital is particularly important as it may indicate a life-threatening emergency. • The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2 recommends that all patients aged = 65 years be screened for CI at admission to hospital. • The Confusion (...) for hospitalised older patients with dementia. 44 A key tenet of the general guidelines and the delirium guidelines was that ‘people with dementia admitted to hospital should have a comprehensive assessment of their cognitive and functional status’ and that ‘delirium should be assessed and treated’. Indeed, one of the key recommendations by the Australian Minister’s Dementia Advisory Group (2012) 1 was that all patients aged 65 years and older should be screened for CI at admission to hospital so

2013 Sax Institute Evidence Check

15. Speech Analysis by Natural Language Processing Techniques: A Possible Tool for Very Early Detection of Cognitive Decline? (PubMed)

to identify early linguistic signs of cognitive decline in a population of elderly individuals. Methods: We enrolled 96 participants (age range 50-75): 48 healthy controls (CG) and 48 cognitively impaired participants: 16 participants with single domain amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI), 16 with multiple domain MCI (mdMCI) and 16 with early Dementia (eD). Each subject underwent a brief neuropsychological screening composed by MMSE, MoCA, GPCog, CDT, and verbal fluency (phonemic and semantic (...) Speech Analysis by Natural Language Processing Techniques: A Possible Tool for Very Early Detection of Cognitive Decline? Background: The discovery of early, non-invasive biomarkers for the identification of "preclinical" or "pre-symptomatic" Alzheimer's disease and other dementias is a key issue in the field, especially for research purposes, the design of preventive clinical trials, and drafting population-based health care policies. Complex behaviors are natural candidates

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Frontiers in aging neuroscience

16. Australian guidelines for the treatment of acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder

to potentially traumatic events 22 Traumatic stress syndromes 23 Acute stress disorder 23 Posttraumatic stress disorder 25 Re-experiencing symptoms 25 Avoidance and numbing symptoms 25 Arousal symptoms 25 Features commonly associated with PTSD 27 Prevalence and incidence of PTSD 27 Comorbid conditions 28 The course of PTSD 28 Resilience in the face of potentially traumatic events 28 1 2viii Posttraumatic mental health disorders: Key differences between ASD and PTSD 29 Screening, assessment and diagnosis 29 (...) Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale CI Confidence interval CINAHL Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature CISD Critical incident stress debriefing CISM Critical incident stress management CNS Central nervous system CP Consensus point CPP Child–parent psychotherapy CPSS Child PTSD Symptom Scale CPT Cognitive processing therapy CPTSDI Children’s PTSD Inventory CPTSD-RI Child PTSD Reaction Index CSA Childhood sexual abuse CT Cognitive therapy CTSQ Child Trauma Screening Questionnaire DALY

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

17. Development and implementation of Persian test of Elderly for Assessment of Cognition and Executive function (PEACE) (PubMed)

Development and implementation of Persian test of Elderly for Assessment of Cognition and Executive function (PEACE) A considerable segment of the elderly population in Iran is illiterate, and it seems the existing neuropsychological screening tests are not very useful for detecting dementia in illiterate participants. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a tool called Persian test of Elderly for Assessment of Cognition and Executive function (PEACE) for detecting dementia (...) ). In addition, there was no significant difference between illiterate and literate participants in the Alzheimer's group. However, the PEACE scores differed significantly (p=0.0000) between illiterate and literate participants in the control group.The PEACE addresses the limitations of existing tests and is appropriate for use in countries that have high rates of illiteracy. It is a valid screening mechanism for the detection of dementia in both illiterate and literate participants.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Electronic physician

18. Omental Transposition Surgery for Mild Alzheimer's Disease

will be performed at baseline, then at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months following surgery: Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognition (ADAS-Cog) General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) Eight-item Informant Interview to Differentiate Aging and Dementia (AD8) Subjects who have early stage AD confirmed by a neuropsychological test (MoCA) and who are healthy enough to undergo surgery. The experimental procedure to be performed is omental transposition (OT) surgery (...) ) score from baseline at 24 months [ Time Frame: 24 months ] Percentage of score change, compared to baseline Change in General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) score from baseline at 24 months [ Time Frame: 24 months ] Percentage of score change, compared to baseline Change in Eight-item Informant Interview to Differentiate Aging and Dementia (AD8) score from baseline at 24 months [ Time Frame: 24 months ] Percentage of score change, compared to baseline Eligibility Criteria Go

2015 Clinical Trials

19. Brief cognitive screening instruments: an update. (PubMed)

significant limitations, the Mini Mental State Exam remains the most frequently used cognitive screening instrument. Its best value in the community and primary care appears to be for the purpose of ruling out a diagnosis of dementia. Instruments such as the Mini-Cog, Memory Impairment Screen (MIS), and the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) have consistently been recognized for utility in primary care. The clock drawing test (CDT) and newer instruments such as the Montreal Cognitive (...) Brief cognitive screening instruments: an update. To review the recent literature on cognitive screening with a focus on brief screening methods in primary care as well as geriatric services.The Medline search engine was utilized using the keyword search terms 'cognitive screening', 'cognitive assessment', and 'dementia screening' limiting articles to those published in English since 1998.679 abstracts were retrieved. Articles focusing on attitudes toward cognitive screening, current screening

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2009 International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

20. Mild Cognitive Impairment (Diagnosis)

spouse, family, or friends [ , ] : Informant General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (informant GPCOG) AD 8-Question Screen (AD8) Short Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (short IQCODE) Previous Next: Treatment & Management Medical care At present, no established treatment exists for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Cholinesterase inhibitors have not been found to delay the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD) or dementia in individuals with MCI; however, has been found (...) [ , ] : Review of patient health risk assessment (HRA) information Patient observation Use of unstructured queries Use of structured cognitive assessment tools for patients and informants The following 3 cognitive assessment tools are recommended for routine use by primary care physicians [ ] : General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG) Mini-Cog Memory Impairment Screen (MIS) Additionally, the Alzheimer’s Association recommends the following 3 cognitive assessment tools for use with the patient's

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>