How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,050 results for

Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

181. Nonatherosclerotic Peripheral Arterial Disease

Review Introduction/Background Lower-extremity vascular diseases span a diverse range of etiologies and may be autoimmune, congenital, degenerative, inflammatory, infectious, metabolic, neoplastic, or traumatic in nature. Examples of such conditions include, but are not limited to, aneurysm formation, atherosclerosis, Buerger disease, cystic adventitial disease, dissection/transection, deep vein thrombosis, external iliac artery endofibrosis (EIAE), fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), popliteal arterial (...) throughout the lower extremities may result in varying degrees of stenosis or occlusion and is most often multifocal [9,10]. Varicose veins and deep vein thrombosis are common venous diseases of the lower extremities, with deep vein thrombosis having an estimated annual incidence of 5 per 10,000 in the general population [11]. Guidelines addressing lower-extremity atherosclerotic vascular disease and deep vein thrombosis have been addressed in previously published ACR Appropriateness Criteria ®

2019 American College of Radiology

182. Global Vascular Guidelines for patients with chronic limb-threatening ischemia

trunk. CFA, Common femoral artery; CTO, chronic total occlusion; DFA, deep femoral artery; Pop, popliteal; SFA, superficial femoral artery. ---- | ---- Fig 5.3 Infrapopliteal (IP) disease grading in Global Limb Anatomic Staging System (GLASS). AT, Anterior tibial; CTO, chronic total occlusion; TP, tibioperoneal. ---- | ---- Fig 5.4 Representative angiograms of Global Limb Anatomic Staging System (GLASS) stage I disease patterns. The target arterial path (TAP) is outlined in yellow . Left panel , TAP (...) (EBR) in the treatment of chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI). Patient risk, Limb severity, and ANatomic stage are integrated in the PLAN approach. WIfI, Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection. ---- | ---- Fig 6.2 PLAN framework of clinical decision-making in chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI); infrainguinal disease. Refer to Fig 6.4 for preferred revascularization strategy in standard-risk patients with available vein conduit, based on limb stage at presentation and anatomic complexity

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 Society for Vascular Surgery

183. Clinical practice guideline on peri- and postoperative care of arteriovenous fistulas and grafts for haemodialysis in adults

grafts. AV access thrombosis Blood clot obstructing the AV access; indicates loss of anatomic, haemodynamic and clinical patency. AV fistula Surgically created autogenous vascular access used for chronic haemodialysis consisting of an anastomosis between an artery and a vein, with the vein serving as the accessible conduit (synonym: native AV fistula). AV graft Surgically created vascular access used for chronic haemodialysis, whereby an artificial or biological prosthetic segment is used to connect (...) recommendations intended to optimize patient care, which are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and harms of alternative care options (synonym: guideline). Maturation Process leading to a newly created AV access being usable for haemodialysis; it encompasses enlargement and thickening of the draining fistula vein, increases in the blood flow and absence of thrombosis and bleeding as mechanisms of AV access failure (synonym: suitability for dialysis). Recommendations

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 European Renal Best Practice

184. Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part II: Recommendations.

–898 ) (3) . Venous Thrombosis Risk Predicting VTE-related risk is challenging, and there are several factors to consider. First, the acuity of the clot is important, as most recurrence and embolization occur within 30 days of clot formation, with rate of clot recurrence decreasing after 3 months from the initial event ( x 14 Kearon, C. Natural history of venous thromboembolism. Circulation . 2003 ; 107 : I22–I30 ) (14) . Clot type and location are also important to consider. A deep vein thrombosis (...) (DVT) carries a higher risk of complications than a superficial vein clot, and a proximal lower-extremity DVT (ie, popliteal vein or more proximal vein) puts the patient at a higher risk for recurrence than a distal lower-extremity DVT (ie, calf) or an upper-extremity DVT. Most pulmonary emboli also carry a high risk of recurrence and complications, but the treatment of subsegmental pulmonary embolism should be considered on a per-case basis ( x 15 Douketis, J.D., Spyropoulos, A.C., Spencer, F.A

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

185. Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions—Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations

be verified. Other tests include the thrombin time test, fibrinogen assay, and D-dimer assay. D-dimers are produced by the action of plasmin (fibrinolytic system) on a cross-linked fibrin clot and are often used to diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or to aid in ruling out acute thrombosis. Various coagulopathies, the use of anticoagulant medications, or liver disease can be associated with abnormalities of the results of these routine coagulation tests ( Table 1 ). Therefore (...) , or IX deficiency Normal ↑ Normal Normal Normal Normal Without history of bleeding: lupus anticoagulant, factor XII deficiency ↑ ↑ ↓ ↑ ↑ ↓ Acute disseminated intravascular coagulation Normal Normal Normal ↑ Normal Normal Acute thrombosis (nonspecific) INR = International Normalized Ratio; PT = prothrombin time; PTT = partial thromboplastin time. There are several classes of anticoagulant medications, such as low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and most direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), that may

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 Society of Interventional Radiology

186. Management of Acute Obstructive Uterovaginal Anomalies

, or those with a vaginal graft, typically will require postoperative hospitalization on bedrest with an indwelling vaginal stent. A vaginal stent may be fashioned from foam, silicone, or packed gauze covered with a sterile condom or glove. It may be left in place from 3 to 7 days depending on the extent of grafting. While the stent is in place, an indwelling urinary catheter, progestin hormonal suppression, antibiotics, and deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis should be prescribed. Once the stent has been (...) - croperforationinaleftobstructedvaginalseptuminapatient with obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA). (Image courtesy of Anne-Marie E. Amies Oelschl- ager, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.) VOL. 133, NO. 6, JUNE 2019 Committee Opinion Obstructive Uterovaginal Anomalies e367Committee Opinion No. 780, Diagnosis and Manage- ment of Hymenal Variants, for more information (16). Distal Vaginal Atresia Distal vaginal atresia is notable for the presence of the upper vagina, cervix, and uterus without evidence

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

187. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Surgical Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia/Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

, cerebrovascular disease, deep vein thrombosis) that necessitate anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy, use of TURP or OSP can present significant clinical challenges or in some cases may be contraindicated. In addition, known complications associated with TURP and open prostatectomy, such as intraoperative and perioperative bleeding requiring transfusion, urethral stricture, bladder neck contracture, stress urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction (ED), and retrograde ejaculation (RE), can negatively (...) with some weaknesses of procedure or generalizability or moderately strong observational studies with consistent findings), or Grade C (RCTs with serious deficiencies of procedure or generalizability or extremely small sample sizes or observational studies that are inconsistent, have small sample sizes, or have other problems that potentially confound interpretation of data). By definition, Grade A evidence is evidence about which the Panel has a high level of certainty, Grade B evidence is evidence

2019 American Urological Association

189. Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

. van der Heijden, E. Veskimäe Guidelines Associates: E. Linares Espinós, M. Rouanne, Y. Neuzillet TABLE OF CONTENTS REFERENCES 1. Rouprêt, M., et al., Guidelines on Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Cell Carcinoma., In: EAU Guidelines 2019 Edn. Presented at the 34th EAU Annual Congress Barcelona 2019. Arnhem, The Netherlands. 2. Babjuk, M., et al., Guidelines on Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (Ta, T1 and CIS). In: EAU Guidelines 2019 Edn. Presented at the 34th EAU Annual Congress Barcelona 2019 (...) node metastasis with MR imaging. Radiology, 1994. 190: 807. 106. Kim, S.H., et al. Uterine cervical carcinoma: comparison of CT and MR findings. Radiology, 1990. 175: 45. 107. Oyen, R.H., et al. Lymph node staging of localized prostatic carcinoma with CT and CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy: prospective study of 285 patients. Radiology, 1994. 190: 315. 108. Barentsz, J.O., et al. MR imaging of the male pelvis. Eur Radiol, 1999. 9: 1722. 109. Dorfman, R.E., et al. Upper abdominal lymph nodes

2019 European Association of Urology

191. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Surgical Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia/Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

, cerebrovascular disease, deep vein thrombosis) that necessitate anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy, use of TURP or OSP can present significant clinical challenges or in some cases may be contraindicated. In addition, known complications associated with TURP and open prostatectomy, such as intraoperative and perioperative bleeding requiring transfusion, urethral stricture, bladder neck contracture, stress urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction (ED), and retrograde ejaculation (RE), can negatively (...) strong observational studies with consistent findings), Grade B (RCTs with some weaknesses of procedure or generalizability or moderately strong observational studies with consistent findings), or Grade C (RCTs with serious deficiencies of procedure or generalizability or extremely small sample sizes or observational studies that are inconsistent, have small sample sizes, or have other problems that potentially confound interpretation of data). By definition, Grade A evidence is evidence about which

2019 American Urological Association

192. Pharmacological Management of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women

have completed a course of teriparatide or abaloparatide, we recommend treatment with antiresorptive osteoporosis therapies to maintain bone density gains. (1|⊕⊕OO) Selective estrogen receptor modulators 5.1. In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk of fracture and with the patient characteristics below, we recommend raloxifene or bazedoxifene to reduce the risk of vertebral fractures. (1|⊕⊕⊕⊕) Patient characteristics: With a low risk of deep vein thrombosis and for whom (...) bisphosphonates or denosumab are not appropriate, or with a high risk of breast cancer. Menopausal hormone therapy and tibolone 6.1 In postmenopausal women at high risk of fracture and with the patient characteristics below, we suggest menopausal hormone therapy, using estrogen only in women with hysterectomy, to prevent all types of fractures. (2|⊕⊕⊕O) Patient characteristics: Under 60 years of age or <10 years past menopause; at low risk of deep vein thrombosis; those in whom bisphosphonates or denosumab

2019 The Endocrine Society

193. Pediatric Endoscopy and High-risk Patients: A Clinical Report From the NASPGHAN Endoscopy Committee

bleeding from the procedure and thromboembolic events from medication discontinuation in decid- ing to proceed with or to defer a procedure (42). Although the generalizability of these guidelines to children has not been rigor- ously examined, it seems reasonable that elective procedures may be deferred for patients on time-limited chronic anticoagulation, such as treatment for a deep vein thrombosis, until treatment is completed. Furthermore, anticoagulation should be stopped (...) and guidance regarding periprocedural antibiotics are also discussed. Key Words: adverse events, bleeding, endoscopy, pediatric (JPGN 2019;68: 595–606) P ediatric gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is a well-established and integral approach to the diagnosis and management of digestive disorders in children. Published data from the Pediatric Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI) suggest the overall rate of complications during upper GI procedures is 2.3%, including a specific risk of respiratory

2019 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

194. HTA of C-reactive protein point-of-care testing to guide antibiotic prescribing

to assist GPs rule out serious bacterial infections, thereby supporting a decision not to provide an antibiotic to those who are unlikely to benefit from treatment. ? Based on a systematic review, the use of CRP POCT to inform antibiotic prescribing in primary care for acute RTIs leads to a 24% reduction in antibiotic prescribing (risk ratio: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.67 to 0.86). Similar levels of reduction in antibiotic prescribing were seen in patients with upper and lower RTIs. There was substantial (...) and their sequelae include: paediatric ( 70 years) patients, those with a pre-existing lung condition (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] or asthma), immuno-compromised patients, and patients resident in long-term care (LTC) facilities such as nursing homes. RTIs are seasonal in nature, with incidence peaking in the winter months. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) of CRP POCT Health Information and Quality Authority xiii RTIs may be classified as upper (pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis

2019 Health Information and Quality Authority

195. Urological Trauma

of upper urinary tract injuries by the EAU Trauma Guidelines Panel. Eur Urol, 2015. 67: 930. 6. Guyatt, G.H., et al. GRADE: an emerging consensus on rating quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. BMJ, 2008. 336: 924. 7. Guyatt, G.H., et al. What is “quality of evidence” and why is it important to clinicians? BMJ, 2008. 336: 995. 8. Phillips B, et al. Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Updated by Jeremy Howick March 2009. 1998. 9. Guyatt, G.H., et al. Going from (...) of the need for nephrectomy after renal trauma. J Trauma, 2006. 60: 164. 101. Wright, J.L., et al. Renal and extrarenal predictors of nephrectomy from the national trauma data bank. J Urol, 2006. 175: 970. 102. DiGiacomo, J.C., et al. The role of nephrectomy in the acutely injured. Arch Surg, 2001. 136: 1045. 103. Brandes, S.B., et al. Reconstructive surgery for trauma of the upper urinary tract. Urol Clin North Am, 1999. 26: 183. 104. Shekarriz, B., et al. The use of fibrin sealant in urology. J Urol

2019 European Association of Urology

196. Renal Transplantation

al. Evaluation of the Vascular Surgical Complications of Renal Transplantation. Ann Vasc Surg, 2016. 33: 23. 172. Giustacchini, P., et al. Renal vein thrombosis after renal transplantation: an important cause of graft loss. Transplant Proc, 2002. 34: 2126. 173. Wuthrich, R.P. Factor V Leiden mutation: potential thrombogenic role in renal vein, dialysis graft and transplant vascular thrombosis. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens, 2001. 10: 409. 174. Parajuli, S., et al. Hypercoagulability in Kidney (...) Transplant Recipients. Transplantation, 2016. 100: 719. 175. Granata, A., et al. Renal transplant vascular complications: the role of Doppler ultrasound. J Ultrasound, 2015. 18: 101. 176. Hogan, J.L., et al. Late-onset renal vein thrombosis: A case report and review of the literature. Int J Surg Case Rep, 2015. 6C: 73. 177. Musso, D., et al. Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism and Major Bleeding After Renal Transplantation: Should We Use Pharmacologic Thromboprophylaxis? Transplant Proc, 2016. 48: 2773

2019 European Association of Urology

197. Management of Stroke Rehabilitation

for or against early supported discharge. Neither for nor against Reviewed, Amended Motor Therapy Upper and Lower Limbs Rehabilitation 5. We recommend task-specific practice (also known as task- oriented practice or repetitive task practice) for improving upper and lower extremity motor function, gait, posture, and activities of daily living. Strong for Reviewed, New-replaced 6. We recommend cardiovascular exercise to increase maximum walking speed after stroke. Strong for Reviewed, New-replaced 7. We (...) , and the wrist. Weak for Reviewed, Amended 10. There is insufficient evidence to recommend for or against mirror therapy for improvements in limb function. Neither for nor against Reviewed, Amended Technology-Assisted Physical Rehabilitation 11. We suggest offering functional electrical stimulation, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as an adjunctive treatment to improve upper and lower extremity motor function. Weak for Reviewed, New-replaced 12. We suggest

2019 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

198. Neonatal seizures

More common in preterm babies 20,35 who have poorer prognosis 20 o May be flexor, extensor, or mixed extensor/flexor 3 o Involve both upper and lower extremities: ? Tonic extension (resemble decerebrate posturing) or ? Tonic flexion of arms and extension of legs (mimics decorticate posturing) 10,36 ? May involve one extremity or whole body axial musculature in a opisthotonic fashion 22 o May be provoked or intensified by stimulation o May be suppressed by restraint or repositioning o Presumed (...) neurometabolic disorders: o Sulphite oxidase deficiency o Non-ketotic hyperglycinaemia o Urea cycle defects • Drug withdrawal syndromes • Pyridoxine dependent Day 2 11,34 • Stroke (venous thrombosis) • Glucose transporter deficiency • Electrolyte deficiency/disturbance: o Hyponatremia o Hypernatremia o Hypocalcaemia o Hypomagnesaemia • Infection Day 3 11,34 • Neurometabolic disorders • Cerebral malformations: o Lissencephaly o Polymicrogyria o Schizencephaly • Other genetic abnormalities • Infection 3

2019 Queensland Health

199. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

imaging on 1.5- and 3-T MRI scanners. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012;198(5):1180-1187. 13. Levy MM, Bach C, Fisher-Snowden R, Pfeifer JD. Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis: reassessing the risk for subsequent pulmonary embolism. Ann Vasc Surg. 2011;25(4):442-447. 14. Lee JA, Zierler BK, Zierler RE. The risk factors and clinical outcomes of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2012;46(2):139-144. 15. Gelabert HA, Jimenez JC, Rigberg DA. Comparison of retavase and urokinase (...) Introduction/Background Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a clinical entity characterized by compression of the neurovascular bundle of the upper limb as it passes from the upper thoracic aperture to the axilla. Although thrombosis of the axillosubclavian vein was first reported by Paget in 1875 and Von Schroetter in 1884, and was coined “Paget- Schroetter syndrome” by Hughes in 1949, the term “Thoracic Outlet Syndrome” was coined in the 1950s to reflect the fact that TOS has many variants, ranging from

2019 American College of Radiology

200. Inotersen sodium (Tegsedi) - Amyloidosis

filtration rate ELISA Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay EOT End of treatment ERG Electroretinogram FAC Familial amyloid cardiomyopathy FAP Familial amyloid polyneuropathy FAS Full Analysis Set GLS Global longitudinal strain hATTR Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis hATTR-CM Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis with cardiomyopathy hATTR-PN Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis with polyneuropathy HED Human equivalent dose HRDB Heart rate to deep breathing I max Maximum inhibitory effect IVS (...) Upper limit of normal 3’-UTR 3’-untranslated region V30M Val30Met Assessment report EMA/411876/2018 Page 6/142 V ss /F Steady state apparent volume of distribution wtATTR Wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis +7 SUM 7 Test Assessment report EMA/411876/2018 Page 7/142 1. Background information on the procedure 1.1. Submission of the dossier The applicant IONIS USA Ltd submitted on 3 November 2017 an application for marketing authorisation to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for Tegsedi, through

2018 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>