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Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity

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2. Thrombolysis for acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. (PubMed)

Thrombolysis for acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. About 5% to 10% of all deep vein thromboses occur in the upper extremities. Serious complications of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis, such as post-thrombotic syndrome and pulmonary embolism, may in theory be avoided using thrombolysis. No systematic review has assessed the effects of thrombolysis for the treatment of individuals with acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis.To assess the beneficial and harmful effects (...) severe bleeding, pulmonary embolism, and all-cause mortality.We found no trials eligible for inclusion. We also identified no ongoing trials.There is currently insufficient evidence from which to draw conclusion on the benefits or harms of thrombolysis for the treatment of individuals with acute upper extremity deep vein thrombosis as an add-on therapy to anticoagulation, alone compared with anticoagulation, or alone compared with any other type of medical intervention. Large randomised clinical

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2017 Cochrane

3. Prediction rule: Low failure rate reported of diagnosis algorithm for suspected upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

Prediction rule: Low failure rate reported of diagnosis algorithm for suspected upper extremity deep vein thrombosis Low failure rate reported of diagnosis algorithm for suspected upper extremity deep vein thrombosis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Low failure rate reported of diagnosis algorithm for suspected upper extremity deep vein thrombosis Article Text Diagnosis Prediction rule Low failure rate reported of diagnosis

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

4. A case report on 2 unique presentations of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. (PubMed)

A case report on 2 unique presentations of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a rare cause of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT). The treatment usually involves catheter directed thrombolysis followed by systemic anticoagulation. Surgical decompression is frequently recommended after anticoagulation for definitive therapy.We report two cases of UEDVT secondary to venous TOS with important clinical presentations.Venous TOS.One patient was initially (...) treated conservatively but had a recurrent UEDVT. The second patient had a residual stump from a prior rib resection that was causing compression on the subclavian vein, resulting in recurrent venous symptoms.Both patients achieved significant improvement in their symptoms at 1 year follow-up.UEDVTs can be debilitating, and may limit activities of daily living. Surgical decompression may offer significant improvement in quality of life and symptom relief in such patients.

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2018 Medicine

5. Upper-Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Breast Cancer With Chest Versus Arm Central Venous Port Catheters (PubMed)

Upper-Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Breast Cancer With Chest Versus Arm Central Venous Port Catheters Most of the patients undergoing treatment for cancer require placement of a totally implantable venous access device to facilitate safe delivery of chemotherapy. However, implantable ports also increase the risk of deep vein thrombosis and related complications in this high-risk population. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of upper-extremity deep vein (...) thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with breast cancer to determine whether the risk of UEDVT was higher with chest versus arm ports, as well as to determine the importance of previously reported risk factors predisposing to UEDVT in the setting of active cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 297 women with breast cancer who had ports placed in our institution between the dates of December 1, 2010, and December 31, 2016. The primary outcome was the development of radiologically confirmed

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2018 Breast cancer : basic and clinical research

6. Deep vein thrombosis

, pelvis, or abdomen, which may result in impaired venous blood flow and consequent leg swelling and pain. Venous thrombosis may also occur in the upper extremities or in more unusual sites, such as the portal, mesenteric, ovarian, and retinal veins, as well as the veins and venous sinuses of the brain. Superficial vein thrombosis, thrombosis affecting veins superficial to the musculature, also commonly occurs. Venous thromboembolism is the broad term that includes DVT and pulmonary embolism (...) Deep vein thrombosis Deep vein thrombosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Deep vein thrombosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Patients who develop deep vein thrombosis (DVT) commonly have thromboembolic risk factors, such as cancer, trauma, major surgery, hospitalisation, immobilisation, pregnancy, or oral contraceptive use. However, many patients have no history

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Deep vein thrombosis

, pelvis, or abdomen, which may result in impaired venous blood flow and consequent leg swelling and pain. Venous thrombosis may also occur in the upper extremities or in more unusual sites, such as the portal, mesenteric, ovarian, and retinal veins, as well as the veins and venous sinuses of the brain. Superficial vein thrombosis, thrombosis affecting veins superficial to the musculature, also commonly occurs. Venous thromboembolism is the broad term that includes DVT and pulmonary embolism (...) Deep vein thrombosis Deep vein thrombosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Deep vein thrombosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Patients who develop deep vein thrombosis (DVT) commonly have thromboembolic risk factors, such as cancer, trauma, major surgery, hospitalisation, immobilisation, pregnancy, or oral contraceptive use. However, many patients have no history

2018 BMJ Best Practice

8. Retrosternal Reconstruction Can be a Risk Factor for Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis After Esophagectomy. (PubMed)

Retrosternal Reconstruction Can be a Risk Factor for Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis After Esophagectomy. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is a rare but important complication because it can cause pulmonary embolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of UEDVT after esophagectomy and the risk factors related to UEDVT.This study included 88 patients who underwent esophagectomy with retrosternal or posterior mediastinal reconstruction using gastric tube (...) . The incidence of UEDVT and the diameter of left brachiocephalic vein were measured using postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). (a) The distance from sternum to brachiocephalic artery and (b) the distance from sternum to vertebra were measured by preoperative CT, and the ratio of (a) to (b) was defined as the width of the retrosternal space.Among the patients, 14 (15.9%) suffered from UEDVT. All UEDVTs were found in left-side upper extremity deep veins. Twelve of the 14 patients (85.7

2017 World Journal of Surgery

9. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis after migration of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): A case report. (PubMed)

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis after migration of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): A case report. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) are widely used in cancer patients and ultrasound-guided PICC insertion could improve success rate. The tip position of the catheter should be located at the border of lower one-third of the superior vena cava (SVC) and cavo-atrial junction. The migration is malposition at the late stage after PICCs were inserted (...) , and catheter malposition was associated with thrombosis and other complications.After patient's informed consent, we report a case of a 66-year-old male with twice catheter migrations resulting in thrombosis after being diagnosed with cardiac cancer.The correct position of the catheter tip can ensure the normal use of PICC and reduce the complications. For the migrated catheter, it should be removed as soon as possible, and when thrombosis has been developed, standard anticoagulant therapy should

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2017 Medicine

10. Rivaroxaban withdrawal and rebound hypercoagulability leading to upper extremity deep vein thrombosis: a case report. (PubMed)

Rivaroxaban withdrawal and rebound hypercoagulability leading to upper extremity deep vein thrombosis: a case report. As the newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used in older patients, clinical scenarios when they may need to be discontinued temporarily or indefinitely, may be encountered. Similarly with increasing use of permanent pacemakers and other intra-cardiac devices, there is an increased risk of upper limb venous thrombosis even few years after their insertion. We report (...) a case of a patient with a permanent pacemaker, on rivaroxaban (NOAC) for atrial fibrillation, who developed an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis after its temporary withdrawal following a traumatic acute subdural haematoma. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of rebound hypercoagulability and venous thrombosis soon after the withdrawal of NOACs.© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please

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2017 Age and ageing

11. Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity. (PubMed)

Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) arises with an incidence of about 1 per 1000 persons per year; 4-10% of all DVTs are located in an upper extremity (DVT-UE). DVT-UE can lead to complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome and pulmonary embolism and carries a high mortality.This review is based on pertinent literature, published from January 1980 to May 2016, that was retrieved by a systematic search, employing the PRISMA criteria, carried out in four (...) complications.DVT of the upper extremity is becoming increasingly common, though still much less common than DVT of the lower extremity. The treatment of choice is anticoagulation, which is given analogously to that given for DVT of the lower extremity.

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2017 Deutsches Arzteblatt international

12. Interventional Therapy for Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis (PubMed)

Interventional Therapy for Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis Approximately 10% of all deep vein thromboses occur in the upper extremity, and that number is increasing due to the use of peripherally inserted central catheters. Sequelae of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) are similar to those for lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LEDVT) and include postthrombotic syndrome and pulmonary embolism. In addition to systemic anticoagulation, there are multiple interventional

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2017 Seminars in interventional radiology

13. A case of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with long-term patency using pharmaco-mechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis in the acute phase (PubMed)

A case of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with long-term patency using pharmaco-mechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis in the acute phase Although upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is considered rare, its prevalence appears to be increasing, and this may be related to expanding indications for catheter-based interventions. In contrast, few cases have been reported related to strenuous exercise, especially in healthy young adults with thoracic outlet syndrome (Paget-Schroetter (...) syndrome). In contrast to lower-extremity DVT, optimal treatment strategies for UEDVT have not been robustly studied. In this report, we describe a 56-year-old man with primary UEDVT presenting with left arm swelling, paresthesia, and visible collateral veins around the shoulder. Venography revealed thrombotic occlusion of the left subclavian vein. Emergent pharmaco-mechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (PCDT) was performed, and his left subclavian vein was recanalized. A novel oral anticoagulant

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2017 Journal of cardiology cases

14. Treatment with direct oral anticoagulants in patients with upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (PubMed)

Treatment with direct oral anticoagulants in patients with upper extremity deep vein thrombosis Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) constitutes around 10% of all DVT, and can cause both pulmonary embolism (PE) and postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the arm. The incidence of secondary UEDVT is increasing due to widespread use of central venous catheters in patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. The safety and efficacy of using new direct acting oral anti coagulants (DOAC

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2017 Thrombosis journal

15. Upper-extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis Complicating Apheresis in a Healthy Donor (PubMed)

Upper-extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis Complicating Apheresis in a Healthy Donor Venous thrombus was recognized in the upper extremity of a 53-year-old man after blood donation. The patient presented with a 15-day history of swelling in the left upper-extremity that started 6 hours after apheresis. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed clots in the deep veins of the left arm and the peripheral pulmonary artery. Blood donation had proceeded smoothly, and the patient had no thrombotic

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2017 Internal Medicine

16. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with peripherally inserted central catheters: a review of the guidelines

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with peripherally inserted central catheters: a review of the guidelines Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with peripherally inserted central catheters: a review of the guidelines Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with peripherally inserted central catheters: a review of the guidelines Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA (...) . No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with peripherally inserted central catheters: a review of the guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). 2011 Authors' conclusions There is a lack of evidence on the maintenance of peripherally inserted central catheters after the development of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

17. Use of d dimer in excluding UEDVTs (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis)

Use of d dimer in excluding UEDVTs (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis) BestBets: Use of d dimer in excluding UEDVTs (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis) Use of d dimer in excluding UEDVTs (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis) Report By: Halah Zareian - A&E SpR Search checked by Richard Parris - A&E Consultant, Royal Bolton Hospital Institution: Royal Bolton Hospital Date Submitted: 11th February 2012 Date Completed: 20th June 2012 Last Modified: 20th June 2012 Status: Green (complete (...) ) Three Part Question In [patients presenting with a swollen upper limb] can a [negative d-dimer] safely [exclude an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis]? Clinical Scenario A 27 year old lady presents to A&E with a one week history of worsening whole right upper limb swelling. She admits to lots of heavy lifting days prior to the swelling commencing. No acute injury can be found and she has no previous medical history. You are concerned she may have an UEDVT. Given she has no risk factors, you

2012 BestBETS

18. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in a triathlete: Again intense endurance exercise as a thrombogenic risk. (PubMed)

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in a triathlete: Again intense endurance exercise as a thrombogenic risk. Triathlon followers increase each year and long-distance events have seen major growth worldwide. In the cycling phase, athletes must maintain an aerodynamic posture on the bike for long periods of time. We report a case of a 38-year-old triathlete with symptoms of an axillary vein thrombosis 48h after a long triathlon competition. After 3days of hospitalization with a treatment (...) consisted on enoxaparin anticoagulant and acenocumarol, the patient was discharged with instructions to continue treatment under home hospitalization with acetaminophen. Four weeks after the process, the patient was asymptomatic and the diameter of his arm was near normality. Due to the growing popularity of events based on endurance exercise, it is necessary more research to determine the etiopathogeny of deep venous thrombosis in athletes.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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2016 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

19. Improving the diagnostic management of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. (PubMed)

Improving the diagnostic management of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Essentials The Constans score and D-dimer can rule out upper extremity deep vein thrombosis without imaging. We evaluated the performance of an extended Constans score and an age-adjusted D-dimer threshold. The extended Constans score did not increase the efficiency compared to the original score. Age-adjusted D-dimer testing safely increased the efficiency by 4%, but this needs validation.Background Among patients (...) with clinically suspected upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT), a clinical decision rule based on the Constans score combined with D-dimer testing can safely rule out the diagnosis without imaging in approximately one-fifth of patients. Objectives To evaluate the performance of the original Constans score, an extended Constans score and an age-adjusted D-dimer positivity threshold. Methods Data of 406 patients with suspected UEDVT previously enrolled in a multinational diagnostic management study were

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2016 Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis

20. Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity

Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration (...) 4 Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity Aka: Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Upper Extremity , Upper Extremity DVT , PICC Line Thrombosis From Related Chapters II. Causes Central Venous Catheter (common) PICC Line Thrombosis (complicates 3-5% of s) External Vein Compression (Effort Thrombosis) Athletes with muscle hypertrophy Idiopathic (rare) Evaluate for occult cancer Consider evaluation for state III. Symptoms or of the hand or arm IV. Signs Arm

2018 FP Notebook

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