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Death Certificate

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161. Excess mortality related to circulatory system diseases and diabetes mellitus among Italian AIDS patients vs. non-AIDS population: a population-based cohort study using the multiple causes-of-death approach. (PubMed)

to assess whether people with AIDS (PWA) experience also an increased mortality for CSDs and diabetes mellitus (DM), as compared to the non-AIDS general population (non-PWA).A nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted including 5285 Italians, aged 15-74 years, who were diagnosed with AIDS between 2006 and 2011. Multiple cause-of-death (MCoD) data, i.e. all conditions reported in death certificates, were retrieved through record-linkage with the National Register of Causes (...) of Death up to 2011. Using MCoD data, sex- and age-standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by dividing the observed number of PWA reporting a specific disease among MCoD to the expected number, estimated on the basis of mortality rates (based on MCoD) of non-PWA.Among 1229 deceased PWA, CSDs were mentioned in 201 (16.4%) certificates and DM in 46 (3.7%) certificates among the various causes of death. These values corresponded to a 13-fold higher

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2018 BMC Infectious Diseases

162. Avoidable mortality from respiratory tract infection and sudden unexplained death in children with chronic conditions: a data linkage study. (PubMed)

on death certificates could indicate which RTI-related deaths might be avoidable through healthcare and public health measures.© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Published by BMJ. (...) Avoidable mortality from respiratory tract infection and sudden unexplained death in children with chronic conditions: a data linkage study. To determine the risk of death from two potentially avoidable causes with different aetiologies: respiratory tract infection (RTI) and sudden unexplained death (SUD) in children with and without chronic conditions.Whole-country, birth cohort study using linked administrative health databases from Scotland.Children aged 2 months to less than 5 years

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2018 Archives of Disease in Childhood

163. Infant and Youth Mortality Trends by Race/Ethnicity and Cause of Death in the United States. (PubMed)

of death, and compare mortality rates with Canada and England/Wales.This descriptive study analyzed death certificate data from the US National Center for Health Statistics, Statistics Canada, and the UK Office of National Statistics for all deaths among individuals younger than 25 years. The study took place from January 1, 1999, to December 31, 2015, and analyses started in September 2017.Race/ethnicity.Average annual percent changes in mortality rates from 1999 to 2015 and absolute rate change (...) Infant and Youth Mortality Trends by Race/Ethnicity and Cause of Death in the United States. The United States has higher infant and youth mortality rates than other high-income countries, with striking disparities by racial/ethnic group. Understanding changing trends by age and race/ethnicity for leading causes of death is imperative for focused intervention.To estimate trends in US infant and youth mortality rates from 1999 to 2015 by age group and race/ethnicity, identify leading causes

2018 JAMA pediatrics

164. Identifying Unreported Opioid Deaths Through Toxicology Data and Vital Records Linkage: Case Study in Marion County, Indiana, 2011-2016. (PubMed)

deaths, from 34.2% to 86.0%.Local jurisdictions may be undercounting opioid-involved overdose deaths to a considerable degree. Toxicology data can improve accuracy in identifying opioid-involved overdose deaths. Public Health Implications. Mandatory toxicology testing and enhanced training for local coroners on standards for death certificate reporting are needed to improve the accuracy of local monitoring of opioid-involved accidental overdose deaths. (...) Identifying Unreported Opioid Deaths Through Toxicology Data and Vital Records Linkage: Case Study in Marion County, Indiana, 2011-2016. To demonstrate the severity of undercounting opioid-involved deaths in a local jurisdiction with a high proportion of unspecified accidental poisoning deaths.We matched toxicology data to vital records for all accidental poisoning deaths (n = 1238) in Marion County, Indiana, from January 2011 to December 2016. From vital records, we coded cases as opioid

2018 American Journal of Public Health

165. Place of death for patients with cancer in the United States, 1999 through 2015: racial, age, and geographic disparities. (PubMed)

Place of death for patients with cancer in the United States, 1999 through 2015: racial, age, and geographic disparities. Place of death is an essential component of high quality cancer care and comprehensive national trends and disparities in place of death are unknown.Deidentified death certificate data were obtained via the National Center for Health Statistics. All cancer deaths from 1999 through 2015 were included. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test for disparities in place (...) of death associated with sociodemographic variables.From 1999 through 2015, a total of 9,646,498 cancer deaths occurred. Hospital deaths decreased (from 36.6% to 24.6%), whereas the rate of home deaths (38.4% to 42.6%) and hospice facility deaths (0% to 14.0%) both increased (all P<.001). On multivariate logistic regression, all assessed variables were found to be associated with place of death. Specifically, younger age (age birth-14 years: odds ratio [OR], 2.39; age 25-44 years: OR, 1.62), black

2018 Cancer

166. Giant---cell arteritis---related mortality in France: A multiple---cause---of---death analysis Giant---cell arteritis---related mortality in France. (PubMed)

Giant---cell arteritis---related mortality in France: A multiple---cause---of---death analysis Giant---cell arteritis---related mortality in France. Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a large vessel vasculitis. Data regarding mortality are controversial. We describe the mortality data of the French death certificates for the period of 2005 to 2014.Using multiple-cause-of-death (MCOD) analysis, we calculated age-adjusted mortality rates for GCA, examined differences in mortality rates according (...) to age and gender and analyzed the underlying causes of death (UCD).We analyzed 4628 death certificates listing a diagnosis of GCA as UCD or non-underlying cause of death (NUCD). The mean age of death was 86 (±6.8) years. The overall age-standardized mortality rate among GCA patients was 7.2 per million population. Throughout the study period, the mean age of death was significantly increased (r = 0.17, p < .0001) in both genders. There was no significant difference with age repartition of death

2018 Autoimmunity reviews

167. Sarcoidosis deaths in the United States: 1999-2016. (PubMed)

Sarcoidosis deaths in the United States: 1999-2016. It has been over a decade since a comprehensive study has been published that has examined sarcoidosis deaths at the national level. The purpose of this study was to analyze sarcoidosis as the underlying cause of death using current national death certificate data. Results from this project can be used to evaluate and compare trends of sarcoidosis reported deaths across the U.S.Mortality data from 1999 to 2016 were provided by the National (...) Vital Statistics System (NVSS) with sarcoidosis (ICD-D86.X) as the underlying cause of death from all resident death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC). Data were analyzed using CDC WONDER, a web-based public health database and analysis tool. Queries were used to generate number of deaths, along with unadjusted and age-adjusted death rates with 95% confidence intervals and standard errors for groups including year, census region, gender, age group, race/ethnicity

2018 Respiratory medicine

168. Trends in Place of Death Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer in the United States. (PubMed)

Trends in Place of Death Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer in the United States. To describe the change over time in place of death (hospital, home, hospice) among all women in the United States who died of gynecologic malignancies and compare them with other leading causes of female cancer deaths.This is a retrospective cross-sectional study using national death certificate data from the Mortality Multiple Cause-of-Death Public Use Record Data. All women who died from gynecologic, breast (...) , lung, and colorectal cancers were identified according to International Classification of Diseases, 10 Revision, cause of death from 2003 to 2015. Regression analyses with ordinary least-squares linear probability modeling were used to test for differences in location of death over time, and differences in trends by cancer type, while controlling for age, race, ethnicity, marital status, and education status.From 2003 to 2015, 2,133,056 women died from gynecologic, lung, breast, and colorectal

2018 Obstetrics and Gynecology

169. Predicting Suicide Attempts and Suicide Deaths Following Outpatient Visits Using Electronic Health Records. (PubMed)

, and June 30, 2015. Health system records and state death certificate data identified suicide attempts (N=24,133) and suicide deaths (N=1,240) over 90 days following each visit. Potential predictors included 313 demographic and clinical characteristics extracted from records for up to 5 years before each visit: prior suicide attempts, mental health and substance use diagnoses, medical diagnoses, psychiatric medications dispensed, inpatient or emergency department care, and routinely administered (...) Predicting Suicide Attempts and Suicide Deaths Following Outpatient Visits Using Electronic Health Records. The authors sought to develop and validate models using electronic health records to predict suicide attempt and suicide death following an outpatient visit.Across seven health systems, 2,960,929 patients age 13 or older (mean age, 46 years; 62% female) made 10,275,853 specialty mental health visits and 9,685,206 primary care visits with mental health diagnoses between Jan. 1, 2009

2018 American Journal of Psychiatry

170. Underlying and immediate causes of death in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (PubMed)

and death certificates from national database of IPF patients treated in Kuopio University Hospital (KUH) from 2002 to 2012 were collected. Mortality was also explored from the death registry database via ICD-10 code J84 revealing the numbers of deaths from pulmonary fibrosis in Finland from 1998 to 2015.Out of 117 deaths, 26.5% were females and 73.5% males in KUH. The most common underlying causes of death were IPF 67.5% and ischemic heart diseases 14.8%. More males died for reasons other than IPF (...) Underlying and immediate causes of death in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The most common cause of death of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been reported to be the lung disease itself and mortality from IPF appears to be increasing. However, the causes of death in patients with IPF taking into account differences between genders and smoking histories as well as disease progression, have not been previously explored.Retrospective data from hospital register

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2018 BMC pulmonary medicine

171. Mortality Related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Co-morbidities in the United States, A Multiple Causes of Death Analysis. (PubMed)

Mortality Related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Co-morbidities in the United States, A Multiple Causes of Death Analysis. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality based on the underlying cause of death (UCOD) underestimates disease burden. We aimed to determine the current COPD mortality rate, trends and the distribution of co-morbidities using United States (US) multiple-cause of death (MCOD) records. All 38,905,575 death certificates of decedents aged ≥45 years (...) in the United States were analyzed for 1999-2015. COPD was defined by ICD-10 codes J40-J44 and J47 based either on the UCOD or up to 20 contributing causes coded. Annual age-standardized COPD death rates were computed by age, gender and race/ethnicity for those with any mention of COPD. In 2015, COPD was mentioned in 11.59% (292,572 deaths) in MCOD, compared to 11.13% (243,617 deaths) in 1999, a 4% increase. However, it was reported as the UCOD for only 5.56% and 4.97% in 2015 and 1999 respectively, an 11

2018 COPD

172. Five-decade trajectories in body mass index in relation to dementia death: follow-up of 33,083 male Harvard University alumni. (PubMed)

typically yet to begin.In all, 33,083 male participants in the Harvard Alumni Health Study underwent a medical examination as undergraduates (typically aged 18 years) during which height, weight, resting pulse rate, blood pressure, physical activity, and smoking status were assessed. Subsamples provided height and weight in 1962/6 (mean age 50.7 years), 1977 (58.6), 1988 (67.5), and 1993 (71.1). Dementia deaths were extracted from death certificates (mean follow-up 53.1 years). We used latent class (...) Five-decade trajectories in body mass index in relation to dementia death: follow-up of 33,083 male Harvard University alumni. In prospective cohort studies, obesity has been linked with a lower risk of subsequent dementia. Reverse causality, whereby neurodegeneration preceding overt dementia symptoms may lower weight, is a possible explanation of these findings. To explore further the weight-dementia association we followed people from early adulthood, an age at which neurodegeneration has

2018 International Journal of Obesity

173. Does smoking kill? A study of death certification and smoking. (PubMed)

Does smoking kill? A study of death certification and smoking. To assess how frequently smoking is cited as a cause of death (COD) on death certificates.A retrospective study of 2128 death certificates and 236 postmortem reports issued at a large teaching hospital between 2003 and 2009.Smoking was identified as the underlying COD on only 2 (0.1%) death certificates and included in part II of the death certificate on 10 (0.5%). The two death certificates citing smoking as the underlying COD were (...) in cases of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study included 279 deaths in which these diagnoses were cited on the death certificate and in the majority of these cases the deceased was a smoker or ex-smoker. A review of postmortem reports from the same period failed to identify a single case in which the pathologist cited smoking as causing or contributing to death. In marked contrast to smoking, 57.4% (vs 0.5%) of death certificates, which included diagnoses linked to alcohol

2011 Journal of Clinical Pathology

174. Reporting of meticillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus on death certificates in Irish hospitals. (PubMed)

Reporting of meticillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus on death certificates in Irish hospitals. The documentation of infection with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on death certificates has been the subject of considerable public discussion. Using data from five tertiary referral hospitals in Ireland, we compared the documentation of MRSA and meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) on death certificates in those patients who died in hospital within 30 days (...) of having MRSA or MSSA isolated from blood cultures. A total of 133 patients had MRSA or MSSA isolated from blood cultures within 30 days of death during the study period. One patient was excluded as the death certificate information was not available; the other 132 patients were eligible for inclusion. MRSA and MSSA were isolated from blood cultures in 59 (44.4%) and 74 (55.6%) cases respectively. One patient was included as a case in both categories as both MRSA and MSSA were isolated from a blood

2011 Journal of Hospital Infection

175. Deriving valid population-based cancer survival estimates in the presence of non-negligible proportions of cancers notified by death certificates only. (PubMed)

Deriving valid population-based cancer survival estimates in the presence of non-negligible proportions of cancers notified by death certificates only. Studies of cancer survival by population-based cancer registries are a key component in monitoring progress against cancer. Patients notified by death certificates only (DCO) are commonly excluded from such studies. The validity of this "exclude DCO" approach has been questioned and an alternative "correct for DCO" approach has been proposed.We

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2011 Cancer Epidemiology & Biomarkers and Prevention

176. Effectiveness of Pregnancy Check Boxes on Death Certificates in Identifying Pregnancy-Associated Mortality (PubMed)

Effectiveness of Pregnancy Check Boxes on Death Certificates in Identifying Pregnancy-Associated Mortality Information that would allow the identification of women who were pregnant at the time of death or within the year preceding death has historically been underreported on death certificates. As a result, the magnitude of the problem of pregnancy-associated mortality is underestimated. To improve the identification of these deaths, check boxes for reporting pregnancy status have been added (...) to death certificates in a number of states. We used multiple external data sources to determine whether check boxes have been effective in identifying pregnancy-associated deaths.We collected data on deaths occurring among pregnant or recently pregnant women residing in Maryland during the years 2001-2008 using multiple data sources. We determined the percentage of these deaths that could be identified through check boxes placed on death certificates.Overall, 64.5% of pregnancy-associated deaths were

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2011 Public Health Reports

177. Temporal Trends in Recording of Diabetes on Death Certificates: Results from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD). (PubMed)

Temporal Trends in Recording of Diabetes on Death Certificates: Results from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD). To determine the frequency that diabetes is reported on death certificates of decedents with known diabetes and describe trends in reporting over 8 years.Data were obtained from 11,927 participants with diabetes who were enrolled in Translating Research into Action for Diabetes, a multicenter prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Data (...) on decedents (N=2,261) were obtained from the National Death Index from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2007. The primary dependent variables were the presence of the ICD-10 codes for diabetes listed anywhere on the death certificate or as the underlying cause of death.Diabetes was recorded on 41% of death certificates and as the underlying cause of death for 13% of decedents with diabetes. Diabetes was significantly more likely to be reported on the death certificate of decedents dying

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2011 Diabetes Care

178. Reliability of death certificate data on vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system (PubMed)

Reliability of death certificate data on vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system Although it is generally stated that national mortality statistics are to some extent unreliable, it is difficult to ascertain their degree of unreliability. In studies carried out in limited areas of Czechoslovakia, Japan and Sweden it has been possible to determine the cause of death at autopsy in a large series of cases, and the findings relevant to "vascular lesions affecting the central nervous (...) system" (CNS) have been compared with the national mortality statistics for the same causes and with the clinical findings.It was found that death rates for vascular lesions affecting the CNS, taken as a whole, obtained from the autopsy studies were close to the national figures but that the ratio of cerebral haemorrhage to cerebral infarction was lower in the autopsy data, indicating that classification into cerebral haemorrhage and cerebral thrombosis is incorrect in the national figures

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1967 Bulletin of the World Health Organization

179. Accuracy of diagnosis on death certificates compared with that in hospital records. (PubMed)

Accuracy of diagnosis on death certificates compared with that in hospital records. 6032061 1967 10 02 2018 11 13 0007-1242 21 1 1967 Jan British journal of preventive & social medicine Br J Prev Soc Med Accuracy of diagnosis on death certificates compared with that in hospital records. 22-9 Alderson M R MR Meade T W TW eng Journal Article England Br J Prev Soc Med 0372672 0007-1242 IM Adolescent Adult Aged Child Child, Preschool Death Certificates England Humans Infant Infant, Newborn Medical

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1967 British journal of preventive & social medicine

180. Quality of death certificate diagnoses of arterioscleroti heart disease. (PubMed)

Quality of death certificate diagnoses of arterioscleroti heart disease. 4960585 1967 06 18 2018 11 13 0094-6214 82 4 1967 Apr Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1896) Public Health Rep Quality of death certificate diagnoses of arterioscleroti heart disease. 339-46 Kuller L L Lilienfeld A A Fisher R R eng Journal Article United States Public Health Rep 0433021 0094-6214 AIM IM Adult Coronary Disease diagnosis Death Certificates Death, Sudden classification Evaluation Studies as Topic

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1967 Public Health Reports

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