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Death Certificate

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141. Association of Low Alanine Aminotransferase with Loss of Independence or Death: a 5-year Population-based Cohort Study. (Abstract)

certifications. The hazard ratios of LOI or death were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for potential confounders.During the median follow-up period of 5.75 (interquartile range 4.85-5.83) years, LOI or death occurred in 195 participants (7.85%). Compared with ALT 20-30 U/L, low ALT was associated with LOI or death (multivariable adjusted hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 3.02 [1.57-5.81] and 1.55 [1.07-2.24] in ALT < 10 and 10-20 U/L groups, respectively), while high ALT (...) Association of Low Alanine Aminotransferase with Loss of Independence or Death: a 5-year Population-based Cohort Study. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is an important enzyme for amino acid metabolism and gluconeogenesis, and low ALT is an indicator of vitamin B6 deficiency. However, it is unknown whether individuals with low ALT are likely to develop loss of independence (LOI) or death. We investigated the association of low ALT with LOI or death in the elderly.Between 2008 and 2010, 2,484

2019 Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology

142. Early death after discharge from emergency departments: analysis of national US insurance claims data. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, in the 20% sample over 2007-12) died within seven days, or 10 093 per year nationally. Mean age at death was 69. Leading causes of death on death certificates were atherosclerotic heart disease (13.6%), myocardial infarction (10.3%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (9.6%). Some 2.3% died of narcotic overdose, largely after visits for musculoskeletal problems. Hospitals in the lowest fifth of rates of inpatient admission from the emergency department had the highest rates of early death (0.27 (...) Early death after discharge from emergency departments: analysis of national US insurance claims data.  To measure incidence of early death after discharge from emergency departments, and explore potential sources of variation in risk by measurable aspects of hospitals and patients. Retrospective cohort study. Claims data from the US Medicare program, covering visits to an emergency department, 2007-12. Nationally representative 20% sample of Medicare fee for service beneficiaries. As the focus

2017 BMJ

143. State Differences in the Reporting of Diabetes-Related Incorrect Cause-of-Death Causal Sequences on Death Certificates. Full Text available with Trip Pro

State Differences in the Reporting of Diabetes-Related Incorrect Cause-of-Death Causal Sequences on Death Certificates. To examine state differences in the reporting of diabetes-related incorrect cause-of-death (COD) causal sequences on death certificates in the U.S.We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study to determine the prevalence of two types of incorrect COD causal sequences with data from the Multiple Cause Mortality File of the year 2004.Among deaths in which diabetes (...) was reported as the first diagnosis on line a, b, c, or d in Part I of the death certificate in the U.S., 21% had below diabetes placement error (ranged from 30% in Maryland to 7% in Hawaii) and 11% had above diabetes placement error (ranged from 18% in Kentucky to 5% in California). The net effects of the two types of error ranged from -0.7% in Nevada to 19.6% in the District of Columbia.Because the rates of incorrect reporting of diabetes-related COD causal sequence varied across states

2012 Diabetes Care

144. Recent mortality trends in Glasgow: 1981-2015

malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (13%) were the most common causes of death among children aged 1-14. Figure 6: Relative distribution of causes of death, 1981-2015, rest of Scotland, boys and girls aged 1-14. Among children in Glasgow, the contribution of fatal motor vehicle traffic accidents to mortality in this age group also declined dramatically, while the relative contributions of respiratory disease and cerebral palsy deaths became slightly more prominent in recent years (data (...) and Figures 22 & 23, pages 32-33). Figure 11: All-cause mortality rates 1981-2015, Glasgow versus the rest of Scotland, men and women aged 15-44. 22 Trends in cause-specific mortality rates External causes In 2011-2015, 45% of deaths among 15-44 year olds in Scotland were attributed to external causes. This category includes traffic accidents and deaths caused by fatal accidents, such as falls, poisonings, drownings and fires – whether intentional or unintentional (i.e. some cases that would also be coded

2017 Glasgow Centre for Population Health

145. Quantitative study ? other: Does certification of staff nurses improve patient outcomes?

-Gallagher D , Aiken LH , Sloane DM , et al . Nurse specialty certification, inpatient mortality, and failure to rescue. Implications for practice and research ■ The study adds to the small evidence base that having more nurses with baccalaureate education and certification is associated with improved patient outcomes (30-day mortality and failure to rescue (death after complications)). ■ More studies are needed to determine the best types of certification and actual practice changes associated (...) Quantitative study ? other: Does certification of staff nurses improve patient outcomes? Does certification of staff nurses improve patient outcomes? | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username

2012 Evidence-Based Nursing

146. Complete Republication: National Association of Medical Examiners Position Paper: Recommendations for the Investigation, Diagnosis, and Certification of Deaths Related to Opioid Drugs Full Text available with Trip Pro

Complete Republication: National Association of Medical Examiners Position Paper: Recommendations for the Investigation, Diagnosis, and Certification of Deaths Related to Opioid Drugs The American College of Medical Toxicology and the National Association of Medical Examiners convened an expert panel to generate evidence-based recommendations for the practice of death investigation and autopsy, toxicological analysis, interpretation of toxicology findings, and death certification to improve (...) the precision of death certificate data available for public health surveillance. The panel finds the following: 1. A complete autopsy is necessary for optimal interpretation of toxicology results, which must also be considered in the context of the circumstances surrounding death, medical history, and scene findings. 2. A complete scene investigation extends to reconciliation of prescription information and pill counts. 3. Blood, urine, and vitreous humor, when available, should be retained in all cases

2013 Journal of Medical Toxicology

147. Utility of Death Certificate Data in Predicting Cancer Incidence Full Text available with Trip Pro

models examined the effects of factors such as survival time, age at diagnosis, and gender on the odds of agreement between death certificate and incidence data.Death certificates under-reported cancer incidence by 10-100%, depending on site. A 1-year increase in survival decreased the odds of agreement between death certificate and ICR data by 18%. Younger and female workers had increased odds of agreement.Death certificates can be useful predictors of cancer incidence, particularly for diseases (...) Utility of Death Certificate Data in Predicting Cancer Incidence Studies often rely on death certificates to identify cancer occurrence. This research assessed the death certificate's ability to reflect cancer incidence and factors that influence agreement with cancer registry data.This study compared death certificates to cancer incidence data for an occupational cohort of 1,795 deceased workers who were registered by the Iowa Cancer Registry (ICR) between 1973 and 2005. Logistic regression

2013 American Journal of Industrial Medicine

148. Determinants and interpretation of death certificate only proportions in the initial years of newly established cancer registries. (Abstract)

Determinants and interpretation of death certificate only proportions in the initial years of newly established cancer registries. The proportion of cases notified by death certificate only (DCO) is a commonly used criterion to judge completeness of cancer registration even though it is affected by additional factors, particularly during initial years of newly established registries.Based on cancer registry data from the United States, we provide model calculations to demonstrate the magnitude (...) and time course of the impact of the following mechanisms on DCO proportions of "young" registries: registration of cancer deaths from patients diagnosed prior to the registration period and delayed registration by death certificate of patients diagnosed but not reported after initiation of registration.DCO proportions of up to ≥30% can be expected from deaths of previously diagnosed patients during the first year of registration. Although this proportion is expected to gradually diminish over

2013 European Journal of Cancer

149. Death certificate completion skills of hospital physicians in a developing country. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Death certificate completion skills of hospital physicians in a developing country. Death certificates (DC) can provide valuable health status data regarding disease incidence, prevalence and mortality in a community. It can guide local health policy and help in setting priorities. Incomplete and inaccurate DC data, on the other hand, can significantly impair the precision of a national health information database. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of death certificates at a tertiary care (...) teaching hospital in a Karachi, Pakistan.A retrospective study conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan for a period of six months. Medical records and death certificates of all patients who died under adult medical service were studied. The demographic characteristics, administrative details, co-morbidities and cause of death from death certificates were collected using an approved standardized form. Accuracy of this information was validated using their medical records. Errors

2013 BMC Health Services Research

150. Accuracy of cause-of-death statements on death certificates Full Text available with Trip Pro

Accuracy of cause-of-death statements on death certificates 13224799 2003 05 01 2018 12 01 0094-6214 70 1 1955 Jan Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1896) Public Health Rep Accuracy of cause-of-death statements on death certificates. 39-51 JAMES G G PATTON R E RE HESLIN A S AS eng Journal Article United States Public Health Rep 0433021 0094-6214 OM Death Death Certificates Humans Medical Records Vital Statistics 5527:36733:396:494 RECORDS, MEDICAL VITAL STATISTICS 1955 1 1 1955 1 1 0 1

1955 Public Health Reports

151. Sudden death in coronary thrombosis. A study of the accuracy of death certification. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sudden death in coronary thrombosis. A study of the accuracy of death certification. 5144382 1972 06 08 2018 11 13 0035-8797 21 112 1971 Nov The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners J R Coll Gen Pract Sudden death in coronary thrombosis. A study of the accuracy of death certification. 654-6 Walford P A PA eng Journal Article England J R Coll Gen Pract 7503107 0035-8797 IM Coronary Disease mortality Death Certificates Death, Sudden Humans Retrospective Studies 1971 11 1 1971 11

1971 The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

152. Problems in the use of death certificates to identify sudden unexpected infant deaths. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Problems in the use of death certificates to identify sudden unexpected infant deaths. 4715716 1973 09 06 2018 11 13 0090-2918 88 6 1973 Jun-Jul Health services reports Health Serv Rep Problems in the use of death certificates to identify sudden unexpected infant deaths. 555-8 Weiss N S NS Green D D Krueger D E DE eng Journal Article United States Health Serv Rep 0430452 0090-2918 AIM IM Classification Death Certificates Death, Sudden Disease Humans Infant Infant Mortality Time Factors United

1973 Health services reports

153. THE STATEMENT OF DURATION OF DISEASE ON DEATH CERTIFICATES AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN CLASSIFYING CAUSES OF DEATH Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE STATEMENT OF DURATION OF DISEASE ON DEATH CERTIFICATES AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN CLASSIFYING CAUSES OF DEATH 18008847 2008 01 14 2008 11 20 0271-4353 3 5 1913 May American journal of public health (New York, N.Y. : 1912) Am J Public Health (N Y) THE STATEMENT OF DURATION OF DISEASE ON DEATH CERTIFICATES AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN CLASSIFYING CAUSES OF DEATH. 462-6 Buren G H GH Bureau of the Census, Washington, D. C. eng Journal Article United States Am J Public Health (N Y) 9716256 0271

1913 American journal of public health (New York, N.Y. : 1912)

154. Sarcoidosis deaths in the United States: 1999-2016. (Abstract)

Sarcoidosis deaths in the United States: 1999-2016. It has been over a decade since a comprehensive study has been published that has examined sarcoidosis deaths at the national level. The purpose of this study was to analyze sarcoidosis as the underlying cause of death using current national death certificate data. Results from this project can be used to evaluate and compare trends of sarcoidosis reported deaths across the U.S.Mortality data from 1999 to 2016 were provided by the National (...) Vital Statistics System (NVSS) with sarcoidosis (ICD-D86.X) as the underlying cause of death from all resident death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC). Data were analyzed using CDC WONDER, a web-based public health database and analysis tool. Queries were used to generate number of deaths, along with unadjusted and age-adjusted death rates with 95% confidence intervals and standard errors for groups including year, census region, gender, age group, race/ethnicity

2018 Respiratory medicine

155. Burden and Risk Factors for Cold-Related Illness and Death in New York City Full Text available with Trip Pro

Burden and Risk Factors for Cold-Related Illness and Death in New York City Exposure to cold weather can cause cold-related illness and death, which are preventable. To understand the current burden, risk factors, and circumstances of exposure for illness and death directly attributed to cold, we examined hospital discharge, death certificate, and medical examiner data during the cold season from 2005 to 2014 in New York City (NYC), the largest city in the United States. On average each year (...) , there were 180 treat-and-release emergency department visits (average annual rate of 21.6 per million) and 240 hospital admissions (29.6 per million) for cold-related illness, and 15 cold-related deaths (1.8 per million). Seventy-five percent of decedents were exposed outdoors. About half of those exposed outdoors were homeless or suspected to be homeless. Of the 25% of decedents exposed indoors, none had home heat and nearly all were living in single-family or row homes. The majority of deaths

2018 International journal of environmental research and public health

156. Behavioral Risk Factors and Regional Variation in Cardiovascular Health Care and Death. (Abstract)

Behavioral Risk Factors and Regional Variation in Cardiovascular Health Care and Death. Reducing the burden of death from cardiovascular disease includes risk factor reduction and medical interventions.This was an observational analysis at the hospital service area (HSA) level, to examine regional variation and relationships between behavioral risks, health services utilization, and cardiovascular disease mortality (the outcome of interest). HSA-level prevalence of cardiovascular disease (...) behavioral risks (smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity) were calculated from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; HSA-level rates of stress tests, diagnostic cardiac catheterization, and revascularization from a statewide multi-payer claims data set from Maine in 2013 (with 606,260 patients aged ≥35 years), and deaths from state death certificate data. Analyses were done in 2016.There were marked differences across 32 Maine HSAs in behavioral risks: smoking (12.4%-28.6%); poor diet (43.6

2018 American journal of preventive medicine

157. Nationwide Study of Sudden Cardiac Death in People With Congenital Heart Defects Aged 0 to 35 Years. Full Text available with Trip Pro

in Denmark.All deaths (n=11 451) among people aged 0 to 35 years in Denmark in 2000 to 2009 (24.4 million person-years) were included. Danish death certificates, autopsy reports, records from hospitals and general practitioners, and data from nationwide Danish registries were used to identify SCD-CHD cases.We identified 90 (11%) cases of SCD-CHD from 809 SCD. The incidence rate of SCD-CHD was 0.4 per 100 000 person-years among people aged 0 to 35 years. In total, 53 (59%) were diagnosed with CHD before death (...) Nationwide Study of Sudden Cardiac Death in People With Congenital Heart Defects Aged 0 to 35 Years. Congenital heart defects (CHD) are among the leading causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young. Nationwide incidence of SCD in people with CHD (SCD-CHD) has not been established in the young general population. The aims of this study were to investigate incidence of SCD-CHD and whether incidence of SCD-CHD in infants declined after implementation of nationwide fetal ultrasound screening

2018 Circulation. Arrhythmia and electrophysiology

158. Place of death in patients with dementia and the association with comorbidities: a retrospective population-based observational study in Germany. Full Text available with Trip Pro

in 1646 cases (15.9%; mean age 86.3 ± 6.9 years; 67.3% women). On average, 1.5 ± 1.0 selected comorbidities were present. Places of death were distributed as follows: home (19.9%), hospital (28.7%), palliative care unit (0.4%), nursing home (49.5%), hospice (0.9%), no details (0.7%). The death certificates documented cardiac failure in 43.6% of cases, pneumonia in 25.2%, and malignant tumour in 13.4%. An increased likelihood of dying in hospital compared to home or nursing home, respectively (...) (Germany), based on the analysis of death certificates from 2011. Individuals with dementia ≥ 65 years were identified using the documented cause of death. In this context, all mentioned causes of death were included. In addition, ten selected comorbidities were also analyzed. The results were presented descriptively. Using multivariate logistic regression, place of death was analyzed for any association with comorbidities.A total of 10,364 death certificates were analyzed. Dementia was recorded

2018 BMC Palliative Care

159. Epidemiology of fatal ruptured aortic aneurysms in the United States (1999-2016). Full Text available with Trip Pro

Epidemiology of fatal ruptured aortic aneurysms in the United States (1999-2016). Ruptured aortic aneurysms (rAAs) are associated with high mortality. The purpose of this study was to describe the trends of deaths due to rAA in the United States.A retrospective review of the national death certificate data from the U.S. National Vital Statistics System was done to identify deaths due to rAAs in the United States between 1999 and 2016. Patients aged 15 years or older with rAA as the underlying (...) cause of death as defined by International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision codes I71.1 (ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm [rTAA]), I71.3 (ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm [rAAA]), I71.5 (ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm), and I71.8 (rAA of unspecified site) were included and standardized to U.S. Census data.A total of 104,458 deaths due to rAAs occurred during the study period. The overall age-adjusted incidence of fatal rAA was 23.3 per 1 million (rAAA, 15.1; rTAA, 3.1

2018 Journal of Vascular Surgery

160. Predicting Suicide Attempts and Suicide Deaths Following Outpatient Visits Using Electronic Health Records. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, and June 30, 2015. Health system records and state death certificate data identified suicide attempts (N=24,133) and suicide deaths (N=1,240) over 90 days following each visit. Potential predictors included 313 demographic and clinical characteristics extracted from records for up to 5 years before each visit: prior suicide attempts, mental health and substance use diagnoses, medical diagnoses, psychiatric medications dispensed, inpatient or emergency department care, and routinely administered (...) Predicting Suicide Attempts and Suicide Deaths Following Outpatient Visits Using Electronic Health Records. The authors sought to develop and validate models using electronic health records to predict suicide attempt and suicide death following an outpatient visit.Across seven health systems, 2,960,929 patients age 13 or older (mean age, 46 years; 62% female) made 10,275,853 specialty mental health visits and 9,685,206 primary care visits with mental health diagnoses between Jan. 1, 2009

2018 American Journal of Psychiatry

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