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Death Certificate

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121. Cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery predict sudden cardiac death independent of ejection fraction. (PubMed)

undergoing first maximal or submaximal exercise testing with cycle ergometer were included (n=3776). CRF in metabolic equivalents (METs) was estimated by achieving maximal work level. HRR was defined as the reduction in heart rate 1 min after maximal exertion. Adjudication of SCD was based on death certificates. LVEF was measured for clinical indications in 71.4% of the patients (n=2697).Population mean age was 55.7 years (SD 13.1; 61% men). 98 SCDs were recorded during a median follow-up of 9.1 years (...) Cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery predict sudden cardiac death independent of ejection fraction. To evaluate whether cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and heart rate recovery (HRR) associate with the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) independently of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF).The Finnish Cardiovascular Study is a prospective clinical study of patients referred to clinical exercise testing in 2001-2008 and follow-up until December 2013. Patients without pacemakers

2019 Heart

122. The Hound of the Baskervilles effect: natural experiment on the influence of psychological stress on timing of death. (PubMed)

762) Americans whose computerised death certificates were recorded between the beginning of January 1973 and the end of December 1998.Ratio of observed to expected numbers of deaths on the fourth day of the month (expected number was estimated from mortality on other days of the month).Cardiac mortality in Chinese and Japanese people peaked on the fourth of the month. The peak was particularly large for deaths from chronic heart disease (ratio of observed to expected deaths = 1.13, 95% confidence (...) The Hound of the Baskervilles effect: natural experiment on the influence of psychological stress on timing of death. To determine whether cardiac mortality is abnormally high on days considered unlucky: Chinese and Japanese people consider the number 4 unlucky, white Americans do not.Examination of cardiac and non-cardiac mortality on and around the fourth of each month in Chinese and Japanese subjects and white controls.United States.All Chinese and Japanese (n=209 908) and white (n=47 328

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2017 BMJ

123. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. A nationwide population-based study. (PubMed)

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. A nationwide population-based study. The incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) varies between studies. We determined the incidence of SUDEP in the entire Icelandic population during a 20-year period.All individuals in Iceland with epilepsy who died unexpectedly from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 2010 were included. Case ascertainment was based on autopsies, reimbursement for antiepileptic drugs, death certificates, information from (...) 1000 person-years. SUDEP accounted for 0.1% of all deaths in Iceland during the study period.SUDEP is an important cause of death in working-age people. This study provides the incidence of SUDEP in an unselected population of an entire country. The SUDEP incidence in the epilepsy population is comparable to that of previous studies.Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2019 International League Against Epilepsy.

2019 Epilepsia

124. Overview and Development of the Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance Determination of Cause of Death (DeCoDe) Process and DeCoDe Diagnosis Standards. (PubMed)

of events) and other antecedent, immediate, and maternal causes of death in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision and the World Health Organization death certificate. Development and use of the CHAMPS diagnosis standards-a framework of required evidence to support cause of death determination-assures a homogenized procedure leading to a more consistent interpretation of complex data across the CHAMPS network. This and other standardizations ensures future (...) Overview and Development of the Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance Determination of Cause of Death (DeCoDe) Process and DeCoDe Diagnosis Standards. Mortality surveillance and cause of death data are instrumental in improving health, identifying diseases and conditions that cause a high burden of preventable deaths, and allocating resources to prevent these deaths. The Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance (CHAMPS) network uses a standardized process to define

2019 Clinical Infectious Diseases

125. Exercise related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young - Pre-mortal characterization of a Swedish nationwide cohort, showing a decline in SCD among athletes. (PubMed)

Exercise related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young - Pre-mortal characterization of a Swedish nationwide cohort, showing a decline in SCD among athletes. To study the frequency, etiology, and premortal abnormalities in exercise-related sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young in Sweden.All subjects with SCD in 10-35-year olds in Sweden during 2000-10, were included (n = 514). Information about each case was retrieved from death certifications, autopsy- and medical records. The number (...) of SCD in athletes was compared to national figures from 1992-99.Exercise-related SCD occurred in 12% (62/514) of the SCD-population, a majority being men (56/62; 90%). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started in 87% (54/62). In total, 48% (30/62), had a cardiac diagnosis, symptoms, family history and/or ECG-changes, before the fatal event. The most prevalent autopsy diagnosis was sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (15/62; 24%). The frequency of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM

2019 Resuscitation

126. Place of death by region and urbanization among gynecologic cancer patients: 2006-2016. (PubMed)

Place of death by region and urbanization among gynecologic cancer patients: 2006-2016. To evaluate associations between US region of residence and urbanization and the place of death among women with gynecologic malignancies in the United States.A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed using publicly available death certificate data from the National Center for Health Statistics. All gynecologic cancer deaths were included from 2006 to 2016. Comparisons among categories were (...) performed with a two-tailed chi-square test, with p-values <0.05 considered significant.From 2006 to 2016, 328,026 women died from gynecologic malignancies in the US. Of these deaths, 40.1% (n = 134,333) occurred in the patient's home, 24.9%(n = 81,823) in the hospital, and 11.3% (37,188) in an inpatient hospice facility. Place of death varied by geographic region. The Northeast had the largest percentage of gynecologic cancer patients (31.3%) die as a hospital inpatient. The West had the highest

2019 Gynecologic Oncology

127. Incidence and Predictors of Opioid Overdose and Death in ER/LA Opioid Users as Measured by Diagnoses and Death Records

Population The source populations will be those members of the selected health plans and insurance programs identified for which full demographic, provider, facility and pharmacy data are available, and in which protected health information (PHI) can be linked to death certificate information. The four large healthcare systems that have established electronic databases for studying coded terminology outcomes selected for this study are: Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW); Group Health Cooperative (GHC (...) Incidence and Predictors of Opioid Overdose and Death in ER/LA Opioid Users as Measured by Diagnoses and Death Records Incidence and Predictors of Opioid Overdose and Death in ER/LA Opioid Users as Measured by Diagnoses and Death Records - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum

2016 Clinical Trials

128. Accuracy of cause-of-death statements on death certificates (PubMed)

Accuracy of cause-of-death statements on death certificates 13224799 2003 05 01 2018 12 01 0094-6214 70 1 1955 Jan Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1896) Public Health Rep Accuracy of cause-of-death statements on death certificates. 39-51 JAMES G G PATTON R E RE HESLIN A S AS eng Journal Article United States Public Health Rep 0433021 0094-6214 OM Death Death Certificates Humans Medical Records Vital Statistics 5527:36733:396:494 RECORDS, MEDICAL VITAL STATISTICS 1955 1 1 1955 1 1 0 1

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1955 Public Health Reports

129. Sudden death in coronary thrombosis. A study of the accuracy of death certification. (PubMed)

Sudden death in coronary thrombosis. A study of the accuracy of death certification. 5144382 1972 06 08 2018 11 13 0035-8797 21 112 1971 Nov The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners J R Coll Gen Pract Sudden death in coronary thrombosis. A study of the accuracy of death certification. 654-6 Walford P A PA eng Journal Article England J R Coll Gen Pract 7503107 0035-8797 IM Coronary Disease mortality Death Certificates Death, Sudden Humans Retrospective Studies 1971 11 1 1971 11

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1971 The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

130. Problems in the use of death certificates to identify sudden unexpected infant deaths. (PubMed)

Problems in the use of death certificates to identify sudden unexpected infant deaths. 4715716 1973 09 06 2018 11 13 0090-2918 88 6 1973 Jun-Jul Health services reports Health Serv Rep Problems in the use of death certificates to identify sudden unexpected infant deaths. 555-8 Weiss N S NS Green D D Krueger D E DE eng Journal Article United States Health Serv Rep 0430452 0090-2918 AIM IM Classification Death Certificates Death, Sudden Disease Humans Infant Infant Mortality Time Factors United

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1973 Health services reports

131. THE STATEMENT OF DURATION OF DISEASE ON DEATH CERTIFICATES AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN CLASSIFYING CAUSES OF DEATH (PubMed)

THE STATEMENT OF DURATION OF DISEASE ON DEATH CERTIFICATES AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN CLASSIFYING CAUSES OF DEATH 18008847 2008 01 14 2008 11 20 0271-4353 3 5 1913 May American journal of public health (New York, N.Y. : 1912) Am J Public Health (N Y) THE STATEMENT OF DURATION OF DISEASE ON DEATH CERTIFICATES AS A DETERMINING FACTOR IN CLASSIFYING CAUSES OF DEATH. 462-6 Buren G H GH Bureau of the Census, Washington, D. C. eng Journal Article United States Am J Public Health (N Y) 9716256 0271

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1913 American journal of public health (New York, N.Y. : 1912)

132. Age-based disparities in end-of-life decisions in Belgium: a population-based death certificate survey. (PubMed)

Age-based disparities in end-of-life decisions in Belgium: a population-based death certificate survey. A growing body of scientific research is suggesting that end-of-life care and decision making may differ between age groups and that elderly patients may be the most vulnerable to exclusion of due care at the end of life. This study investigates age-related disparities in the rate of end-of-life decisions with a possible or certain life shortening effect (ELDs) and in the preceding decision (...) making process in Flanders, Belgium in 2007, where euthanasia was legalised in 2002. Comparing with data from an identical survey in 1998 we also study the plausibility of the 'slippery slope' hypothesis which predicts a rise in the rate of administration of life ending drugs without patient request, especially among elderly patients, in countries where euthanasia is legal.We performed a post-mortem survey among physicians certifying a large representative sample (n = 6927) of death certificates

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2012 BMC Public Health

133. End-of-life medical decisions in France: a death certificate follow-up survey 5 years after the 2005 act of parliament on patients' rights and end of life. (PubMed)

End-of-life medical decisions in France: a death certificate follow-up survey 5 years after the 2005 act of parliament on patients' rights and end of life. The "Patients' Rights and End of Life Care" Act came into force in France in 2005. It allows withholding/withdrawal of life-support treatment, and intensified use of medications that may hasten death through a double effect, as long as hastening death is not the purpose of the decision. It also specifies the requirements of the decision (...) -making process. This study assesses the situation by examining the frequency of end-of-life decisions by patients' and physicians' characteristics, and describes the decision-making processes.We conducted a nationwide retrospective study of a random sample of adult patients who died in December 2009. Questionnaires were mailed to the physicians who certified/attended these deaths. Cases were weighted to adjust for response rate bias. Bivariate analyses and logistic regressions were performed for each

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2012 BMC Palliative Care

134. Outcomes of prolonged mechanic ventilation: a discrimination model based on longitudinal health insurance and death certificate data. (PubMed)

Outcomes of prolonged mechanic ventilation: a discrimination model based on longitudinal health insurance and death certificate data. This study investigated prognosis among patients under prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) through exploring the following issues: (1) post-PMV survival rates, (2) factors associated with survival after PMV, and (3) the number of days alive free of hospital stays requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) care after PMV.This is a retrospective cohort study based (...) on secondary analysis of prospectively collected data in the national health insurance system and governmental data on death registry in Taiwan. It used data for a nationally representative sample of 25,482 patients becoming under PMV (> = 21 days) during 1998-2003. We calculated survival rates for the 4 years after PMV, and adopted logistic regression to construct prediction models for 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year survival, with data of 1998-2002 for model estimation and the 2003 data

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2012 BMC Health Services Research

135. Death certification: do consultant pathologists do it better? (PubMed)

Death certification: do consultant pathologists do it better? The completion of the medical certificate of cause of death is required for registration of a death, and this data helps plan healthcare services for the country. Many audits have shown them to be inaccurately completed by junior doctors, but the authors examined whether advice from consultant pathologists could improve this. Using the Office for National Statistics guidelines, the authors found that only 56% of the certificates were (...) appropriately completed. The planned introduction of medical examiners to England and Wales is aimed at improving this situation, but consultant pathologists will still issue causes of death following postmortems, and it would seem prudent to train pathologists as well.

2012 Journal of Clinical Pathology

136. The Fate of Historical Death Certificates: The Silent Burning of Another Library of Alexandria. (PubMed)

The Fate of Historical Death Certificates: The Silent Burning of Another Library of Alexandria. 23078497 2013 01 18 2018 11 13 1541-0048 102 12 2012 Dec American journal of public health Am J Public Health The fate of historical death certificates: the silent burning of another Library of Alexandria. e1-2 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301086 Alonso Wladimir J WJ Acuña-Soto Rodolfo R Schuck-Paim Cynthia C Breman Joel G JG eng Historical Article Letter 2012 10 18 United States Am J Public Health 1254074 0090 (...) -0036 AIM IM Death Certificates history Epidemiologic Methods Forms and Records Control History, 20th Century Humans 2012 10 20 6 0 2012 10 20 6 0 2013 1 19 6 0 ppublish 23078497 10.2105/AJPH.2012.301086 PMC3519327 Bull World Health Organ. 1986;64(1):79-84 3524885 Am J Public Health. 2012 Oct;102(10):1848-57 22897550 Vaccine. 2011 Jul 22;29 Suppl 2:B16-20 21757098 Vaccine. 2011 Jul 22;29 Suppl 2:B1-5 21757096

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2012 American Journal of Public Health

137. Do medical certificates of stillbirth provide accurate and useful information regarding the cause of death? (PubMed)

Do medical certificates of stillbirth provide accurate and useful information regarding the cause of death? Stillbirth affects one in 200 pregnancies in the UK. Understanding the causes of stillbirth is essential to reducing perinatal mortality. Stillbirth certificates represent a potential source of data on perinatal mortality. We aimed to assess whether the information on stillbirth certificates used in the UK is accurate. A retrospective cross-sectional audit of stillbirth certificates (...) issued in a geographical region of the UK in 2009 was undertaken. Data were recorded from the stillbirth certificate and health records. The cause of death was classified using the ReCoDe system. Two hundred and thirteen stillbirth certificates were issued for stillbirths (feticides for fetal anomaly were excluded). Agreement for the primary factor associated with the stillbirth was fair (Kappa = 0.286). This contrasts with the gestation of stillbirth, which was almost complete agreement (Kappa

2012 Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology

138. Uncertainties in death certification (PubMed)

Uncertainties in death certification 23211253 2013 12 11 2018 11 13 1478-5242 62 605 2012 Dec The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners Br J Gen Pract Uncertainties in death certification. 658-9 10.3399/bjgp12X659439 Lakasing Edin E Watford Vocational Training Scheme, and University College Hospital and Imperial College Medical Schools, UK. edin.lakasing@chorleywoodhealthcentre. nhs.uk Minkoff Simon S eng Case Reports Journal Article (...) England Br J Gen Pract 9005323 0960-1643 IM Aged Autopsy methods standards Cause of Death Death Certificates Death, Sudden etiology Female Humans Magnetic Resonance Imaging Male Observer Variation Tomography, X-Ray Computed 2012 12 6 6 0 2012 12 6 6 0 2013 12 16 6 0 ppublish 23211253 10.3399/bjgp12X659439 PMC3505406 BMJ. 2002 Jun 15;324(7351):1423-4 12065265 J R Soc Med. 2011 Jul;104(7):278-82 21725092 Histopathology. 2003 May;42(5):424-30 12713618 Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1983 Aug 13;287(6390):444-5

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2012 The British Journal of General Practice

139. Death Certificate

Death Certificate Death Certificate Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Death Certificate Death Certificate Aka: Death (...) Certificate II. Deaths Reportable to Medical Examiner Homicide Fatal Accident Lethal Disaster Suspicious circumstances surrounding death Death while in Police custody Death During surgery or anesthesia Sudden and unexpected death Without medical attendance III. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Death Certificate." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related

2015 FP Notebook

140. State Differences in the Reporting of 'Unspecified Stroke' on Death Certificates: Implications for Improvement. (PubMed)

State Differences in the Reporting of 'Unspecified Stroke' on Death Certificates: Implications for Improvement. Little is known about the comparability of stroke subtype mortality across states. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study to examine state differences in the reporting of "unspecified stroke" on death certificates in the United States.The number of deaths from different subtypes of stroke in each state for the years 2007 to 2009 were obtained from the CDC WONDER online (...) databases. We calculated the percentage of stroke deaths classified as unspecified stroke (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision [ICD-10] code I64) among all stroke deaths (ICD-10 codes I60-I69) for each state.Of 398 942 people who died from stoke in the United States between 2007 and 2009, in 209 933 (53%) cases, the medical certifier did not specify whether the stroke was hemorrhage or infarction on the death certificate. There were 44 states in which the percentage of unspecified

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2012 Stroke

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