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Dancer Injuries

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21. The Effect of Single-Leg Stance on Dancer and Control Group Static Balance Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Effect of Single-Leg Stance on Dancer and Control Group Static Balance The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic differences of static balance between female dancers (D) with at least seven years of dance experience and female non-dancers (ND) who were typical college students. Participants were tested in single-leg stance. Both the dominant leg (DL) and non-dominant leg (NDL) were tested with the participants shod (S) and barefoot (BF). Kinetic variables (vertical, medio-lateral [ML (...) . D and ND in BF and S conditions with DL and NDL static stance demonstrate different AP and ML GRF when balancing over a 30-second time interval. Data may suggest that ND are more prone to lose their balance. Further investigation is warranted to understand whether individuals in the rehabilitative field and athletic populations can use dance therapy for injury prevention and rehabilitation.

2016 International journal of exercise science

22. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout” Full Text available with Trip Pro

Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout” The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve "turning out" or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg (...) alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements

2016 Open access journal of sports medicine

23. The Effectiveness of Kinesio® Tex Tape on Gluteus Medius Activation in Dancers

professional level dancers Exclusion Criteria: Non-professional level of dance or non-dancer; obesity (body mass index greater than 30 kg/m²) A history of major back, abdominal, or lower extremity surgery A history of muscle diseases; a history of serious cardiovascular diseases (e.g., cardiac insufficiency, arrhythmia, severe hypertension, vascular insufficiency) A history of serious respiratory diseases; major fractures of the lower extremities; lower extremity or trunk injury within the last year (...) The Effectiveness of Kinesio® Tex Tape on Gluteus Medius Activation in Dancers The Effectiveness of Kinesio® Tex Tape on Gluteus Medius Activation in Dancers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more

2016 Clinical Trials

24. Prevalence of Chondromalacia Patella Among Adolescent Dancers

Chondromalacia Cartilage Diseases Other: Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Detailed Description: A cross sectional study in which comparing of dancers to non-dancers athletes will be carried. Specifically, chondromalacia patella will be studied and compared between dancers with and without knee injuries and non-dancers athletes. Study will include detailed function and pain questionnaires, physical findings and sonographic study of the knee joint. Study Design Go to Layout table for study (...) to Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment Dancers with knee injury A cohort of dancers with reported knee injury. Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Other: Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Function and pain questioners, physical findings and sonographic study of the knee joint Dancers with no knee injury A cohort of dancers without reported knee injury. Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Other: Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Function and pain questioners

2015 Clinical Trials

25. Injury Occurrence in Hip-hop Dance

of structural training program and body composition on injury occurrence in hip-hop dance. Assuming that training program can significantly lower the number of injuries (experimental group will have less injuries during and at the end of the trial) and that body fat percentage negatively effects injury occurrence (dancers with higher body fat percentage will be more often injured). Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Sports Injury Body Composition Other: Structural training program (...) Injury Occurrence in Hip-hop Dance Injury Occurrence in Hip-hop Dance - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Injury Occurrence in Hip-hop Dance The safety and scientific validity of this study

2018 Clinical Trials

26. Workload Intensity and Rest Periods in Professional Ballet: Connotations for Injury. (Abstract)

Workload Intensity and Rest Periods in Professional Ballet: Connotations for Injury. Fatigue and overwork have been cited as the main cause of injury with the dance profession. Previous research has shown a difference in workload between professional dancers of different rank, but the role of sex has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to determine workload intensity, rest, and sleep profiles of professional ballet dancers. 48 professional ballet dancers (M=25, F=23) took part (...) in an observational design over 7-14 days using triaxial accelerometer devices. Minutes in METS at different intensities, total time asleep and rest breaks were analysed. Significant main effects for rank (p<0.001) and rank by sex (p=0.003) for total PA, working day activity, post work activity and sleep. Sleep ranged between 2.4-9.6 h per night. All participants spent more time between 1.5-3 METS outside of work. Significant amounts of exercise where carried out outside of their work day, therefore when injury

2020 International Journal of Sports Medicine

27. Work-related floors as injury hazards – a nationwide pilot project analyzing floors in theatres and education establishments in Germany Full Text available with Trip Pro

Work-related floors as injury hazards – a nationwide pilot project analyzing floors in theatres and education establishments in Germany An adequate dance floor is said to prevent injuries. On the basis of scientific research, numerous recommendations regarding an adequate dance floor have been developed. Up to the present, however, studies have still been lacking into how far these recommendations have already been implemented in theatres with regular dance productions and/or in-house dance (...) % were equipped with a sprung sub-floor in the ballet studios. In contrast, sprung sub-floors were only found in 29.7% of the working areas, the stage AND ballet studios in theatres. The percentage of theatres providing sprung sub-floors in all rooms used by dancers is even lower. Considering all dance-related work areas, larger ensembles (>30 dancers) were offered better conditions regarding floors than smaller ensembles (p > 0.001). No significant tendencies were found regarding regions or dance

2017 Journal of occupational medicine and toxicology (London, England)

28. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet: Influence of Age and Years of Professional Practice Full Text available with Trip Pro

Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet: Influence of Age and Years of Professional Practice In spite of the high rate of overuse injuries in ballet dancers, no studies have investigated the prevalence of overuse injuries in professional dancers by providing specific diagnoses and details on the differences in the injuries sustained as a function of age and/or years of professional practice.Overuse injuries are the most prevalent injuries in ballet dancers. Professional ballet dancers suffer (...) different types of injuries depending on their age and years of professional practice.Descriptive epidemiology study.This descriptive epidemiological study was carried out between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, regarding injuries sustained by professional dancers belonging to the major Spanish ballet companies practicing classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish dance. The sample was distributed into 3 different groups according to age and years of professional practice. Data were

2017 Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine

29. Effect of a physical conditioning versus health promotion intervention in dancers: A randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

Effect of a physical conditioning versus health promotion intervention in dancers: A randomized controlled trial. Although dancing requires extensive physical exertion, dancers do not often train their physical fitness outside dance classes. Reduced aerobic capacity, lower muscle strength and altered motor control have been suggested as contributing factors for musculoskeletal injuries in dancers. This randomized controlled trial examined whether an intervention program improves aerobic (...) capacity and explosive strength and reduces musculoskeletal injuries in dancers. Forty-four dancers were randomly allocated to a 4-month conditioning (i.e. endurance, strength and motor control training) or health promotion program (educational sessions). Outcome assessment was conducted by blinded assessors. When accounting for differences at baseline, no significant differences were observed between the groups following the intervention, except for the subscale "Pain" of the Short Form 36

2014 Manual therapy Controlled trial quality: uncertain

30. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus in a Break-Dancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

. eng Journal Article 2014 01 17 United States Eplasty 101316107 1937-5719 break dancer extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture trauma wrist 2014 2 7 6 0 2014 2 7 6 0 2014 2 7 6 1 epublish 24501618 PMC3899809 Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg. 2004;38(1):32-5 15074721 Injury. 2009 Nov;40(11):1207-11 19540489 Eplasty. 2013;13:e11 23460929 Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ). 1996 Feb;25(2):118-22 8640381 (...) Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus in a Break-Dancer 24501618 2014 02 06 2018 11 13 1937-5719 14 2014 Eplasty Eplasty Spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus in a break-dancer. e4 Shifflett Grant D GD Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY. Ek Eugene T H ET Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY. Weiland Andrew J AJ Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

2014 Eplasty

31. Lower limb kinematic variability in dancers performing drop landings onto floor surfaces with varied mechanical properties. (Abstract)

Lower limb kinematic variability in dancers performing drop landings onto floor surfaces with varied mechanical properties. Elite dancers perform highly skilled and consistent movements. These movements require effective regulation of the intrinsic and extrinsic forces acting within and on the body. Customized, compliant floors typically used in dance are assumed to enhance dance performance and reduce injury risk by dampening ground reaction forces during tasks such as landings. As floor (...) compliance can affect the extrinsic forces applied to the body, secondary effects of floor properties may be observed in the movement consistency or kinematic variability exhibited during dance performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of floor mechanical properties on lower extremity kinematic variability in dancers performing landing tasks. A vector coding technique was used to analyze sagittal plane knee and ankle joint kinematic variability, in a cohort of 12 pre-professional

2013 Human movement science

32. Proximal base stress fracture of the second metatarsal in a Highland dancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

Proximal base stress fracture of the second metatarsal in a Highland dancer A 15-year-old female Highland dancer presented to the accident and emergency department with an ankle inversion injury on a background of several weeks of pain in the right foot. A radiograph of the right foot demonstrated a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. She was treated conservatively with a below knee removable supportive walking boot with a rocker bottom sole. She re-presented to the accident (...) and emergency department 3 weeks later with pins and needles in the right foot; she was given crutches to use along side the supportive walking boot. Radiographs 12 weeks after the first presentation showed healing of the stress fracture. The patient was now asymptomatic of the injury. She was unable to fully train for 12 weeks due to the injury. Conservative management was successful in this patient.

2013 BMJ case reports

33. Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 1: Influence of sex on risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 1: Influence of sex on risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among dancers is much lower than among team sport athletes, and no clear disparity between sexes has been reported in the dance population. Although numerous studies have observed differences in landing biomechanics of the lower extremity between male and female team sport athletes (...) , there is currently little research examining the landing biomechanics of male and female dancers and none comparing athletes to dancers. Comparing the landing biomechanics within these populations may help explain the lower overall ACL injury rates and lack of sex disparity.The purpose was to compare the effects of sex and group (dancer vs team sport athlete) on single-legged drop-landing biomechanics. The primary hypothesis was that female dancers would perform a drop-landing task without demonstrating typical

2014 American Journal of Sports Medicine

34. Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 2: Influence of fatigue and implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury. (Abstract)

Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 2: Influence of fatigue and implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Fatigue is strongly linked to an increased risk of injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Part 1 of this study identified differences in the biomechanics of landing from a jump between dancers and team athletes, particularly female athletes, which may explain the epidemiological differences in ACL injuries (...) with mechanics that were more at risk for ACL injuries as compared with before fatigue.Dancers took significantly longer to reach fatigue than team athletes. Female athletes consistently exhibited landing patterns associated with a risk for ACL injuries when compared with the other 3 groups. Fatigue changed landing mechanics similarly in both dancers and athletes, such that all groups landed with worse alignment after being fatigued.Dancers are more resistant to lower extremity fatigue than athletes

2014 American Journal of Sports Medicine

35. A cross-sectional study of the biopsychosocial characteristics of elite adult irish dancers and their association with musculoskeletal pain and injury. (Abstract)

A cross-sectional study of the biopsychosocial characteristics of elite adult irish dancers and their association with musculoskeletal pain and injury.

2014 British Journal of Sports Medicine

36. Athletes Doing Arabesques: Important Considerations in the Care of Young Dancers. (Abstract)

Athletes Doing Arabesques: Important Considerations in the Care of Young Dancers. Dance is as much a sport as an art form. Sports medicine clinicians seeing dancers in their practice will need to be familiar with the unique characteristics of dance in order to provide proper care. Dance encompasses different forms, which vary in equipment and terminology. The epidemiology of dance injuries has historically focused on ballet, but there is increasing research on other dance forms. Lower extremity (...) and back injuries predominate. Injury prevention, both primary and secondary, is at the heart of dance medicine. Primary prevention includes preseason conditioning, identifying risk factors for injury, and recognizing the female athlete triad. Secondary prevention includes a comprehensive approach to injury rehabilitation, an appreciation for the unique demands of dance, and an understanding of the particulars of the injury being treated. Dancers may have difficulty accessing medical care or following

2015 Current Sports Medicine Reports

37. Injuries among Talented Young Dancers: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training. (Abstract)

Injuries among Talented Young Dancers: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training. The aim of the present study was to characterize the injuries of young dancers attending Centres for Advanced Training. 806 dancers, ages 10-18 years responded to surveys regarding their biological profile, dance experience and injury history, and were examined for their anthropometric profile. Of the 806 dancers, 347 reported an injury. Based on 4 age groups, the total hours of practice per week (...) increased significantly with increasing age. Incidence of injuries per 1000 h of dance practice for dancers ages 11-12 were found to be significantly higher compared to the incidence for dancers ages 13-18 (p<0.05). Foot and ankle and other lower extremities were the most common injury location, and muscle injuries were the most common type of injury. Total months in CAT training (OR=1.044, 95% CI=1.014-1.075) and hours per week in creative style practice (OR=1.282, 95% CI=1.068-1.539) were found

2013 International Journal of Sports Medicine

38. Musculoskeletal injuries in young ballet dancers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Musculoskeletal injuries in young ballet dancers. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries, site and type of injury, and the most common injury diagnoses in young ballet dancers at the Royal Swedish Ballet School, a public school in Stockholm.This retrospective study of 476 students (297 girls and 179 boys) aged 10-21 years was based on medical records for the period August 1988 to June 1995. Data on diagnosis, site of injury and type of injury were (...) collected, and the injuries were classified as traumatic or due to overuse.In total, 438 injuries were recorded. The injury incidence rate was 0.8 per 1,000 dance hours in both female and male dancers and tended to increase with increasing age. Most injuries occurred as the result of overuse. Seventy-six per cent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities. Ankle sprain was the most common traumatic diagnosis, while the most common overuse-related diagnosis was tendinosis pedis. A few gender

2011 Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

39. Effects of aerobic endurance, muscle strength, and motor control exercise on physical fitness and musculoskeletal injury rate in preprofessional dancers: an uncontrolled trial. (Abstract)

Effects of aerobic endurance, muscle strength, and motor control exercise on physical fitness and musculoskeletal injury rate in preprofessional dancers: an uncontrolled trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate musculoskeletal injury rate and physical fitness before and 6 months after an endurance, strength, and motor control exercise program in preprofessional dancers.This uncontrolled trial was completed at a college offering a professional bachelor degree in dance. Forty (...) preprofessional dancers underwent a test battery before and after a 6-month lasting exercise program in addition to their regular dance lessons. Physical fitness was evaluated by means of a submaximal exercise test with continuous physiological monitoring and by a field test for explosive strength. Anthropometric measurements were taken to analyze the influence of fitness training on body composition. Musculoskeletal injury incidence and quality of life were recorded during the 6-month lasting intervention

2012 Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

40. Sport-specific biomechanics of spinal injuries in aesthetic athletes (dancers, gymnasts, and figure skaters). (Abstract)

Sport-specific biomechanics of spinal injuries in aesthetic athletes (dancers, gymnasts, and figure skaters). Young aesthetic athletes require special understanding of the athletic biomechanical demands peculiar to each sport. The performance of these activities may impart specific biomechanical stresses and subsequent injury patterns. The clinician must understand these aspects as well as the spinal changes that occur with growth when many of these injuries often occur. Further, athletes (...) , parents, coaches, and healthcare providers must be sensitive to the overall aspects of the athlete, including nutrition, overtraining, adequate recovery, proper technique, and limiting repetition of difficult maneuvers to minimize injuries.

2012 Clinics in Sports Medicine

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