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Dancer Injuries

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21. Lower Limb and Trunk Biomechanics After Fatigue in Competitive Female Irish Dancers (PubMed)

Lower Limb and Trunk Biomechanics After Fatigue in Competitive Female Irish Dancers   Because of the increasing popularity of participation in Irish dance, the incidence of lower limb injuries is high among this competitive population.  To investigate the effects of fatigue on the peak lower limb and trunk angles as well as the peak lower limb joint forces and moments of competitive female Irish dancers during the performance of a dance-specific single-limb landing.  Cross-sectional study (...) with the prefatigue landing trials.  When fatigued, dancers displayed a decline in landing performance in terms of aesthetics as well as increased ankle- and knee-joint loading, potentially exposing them to a greater risk of injuries.

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2017 Journal of athletic training

22. Descriptive Values for Dancers on Baseline Concussion Tools (PubMed)

System = 3.2 ± 3.1 errors; and King-Devick = 41.5 ± 8.2 seconds. A Mann-Whitney test revealed differences in King-Devick scores between female (40.8 ± 8.0 seconds) and male (43.4 ± 8.4 seconds) dancers ( P = .04). An independent-samples t test also demonstrated a difference in modified Balance Error Scoring System scores between female (2.95 ± 3.1 errors) and male (3.8 ± 3.1 errors) dancers ( P = .02). Age, hours of sleep, height, and history of concussion, depression, or injury did not display (...) Descriptive Values for Dancers on Baseline Concussion Tools   Capturing baseline data before a concussion can be a valuable tool in individualized care. However, not all athletes, including dancers, have access to baseline testing. When baseline examinations were not performed, clinicians consult normative values. Dancers are unique athletes; therefore, describing values specific to dancers may assist those working with these athletes in making more informed decisions.  To describe values

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2017 Journal of athletic training

23. Musculoskeletal Injury in Professional Dancers: Prevalence and Associated Factors: An International Cross-Sectional Study. (PubMed)

Musculoskeletal Injury in Professional Dancers: Prevalence and Associated Factors: An International Cross-Sectional Study. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with injury in professional ballet and modern dancers, and assess if dancers are reporting their injuries and explore reasons for not reporting injuries.Cross-sectional study.Participants were recruited from nine professional ballet and modern dance companies in Canada, Denmark, Israel (...) , and Sweden.Professional ballet and modern dancers.Sociodemographic variables included age, sex, height, weight, and before-tax yearly or monthly income. Dance specific characteristics included number of years in present dance company, number of years dancing professionally, number of years dancing total, and rank in the company.Self-reported injury and Self-Estimated Functional Inability because of Pain.A total of 260 dancers participated in the study with an overall response rate of 81%. The point prevalence of self

2016 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

24. The Effectiveness of Kinesio® Tex Tape on Gluteus Medius Activation in Dancers

professional level dancers Exclusion Criteria: Non-professional level of dance or non-dancer; obesity (body mass index greater than 30 kg/m²) A history of major back, abdominal, or lower extremity surgery A history of muscle diseases; a history of serious cardiovascular diseases (e.g., cardiac insufficiency, arrhythmia, severe hypertension, vascular insufficiency) A history of serious respiratory diseases; major fractures of the lower extremities; lower extremity or trunk injury within the last year (...) The Effectiveness of Kinesio® Tex Tape on Gluteus Medius Activation in Dancers The Effectiveness of Kinesio® Tex Tape on Gluteus Medius Activation in Dancers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more

2016 Clinical Trials

25. LOWER EXTREMITY HYPERMOBILITY, BUT NOT CORE MUSCLE ENDURANCE INFLUENCES BALANCE IN FEMALE COLLEGIATE DANCERS (PubMed)

LOWER EXTREMITY HYPERMOBILITY, BUT NOT CORE MUSCLE ENDURANCE INFLUENCES BALANCE IN FEMALE COLLEGIATE DANCERS Dance is a physically demanding activity, with almost 70% of all injuries in dancers occurring in the lower extremity (LE). Prior researchers report that muscle function (e.g. muscle endurance) and anatomical factors (e.g. hypermobility) affect physical performance (e.g. balance) and can subsequently influence LE injury risk. Specifically, lesser core muscle endurance, balance deficits (...) , and greater hypermobility are related to increased LE injury risk. However, the potentials interrelationships among these factors in dancers remain unclear.The purposes of this study were to examine the relationships among core muscle endurance, balance, and LE hypermobility, and determine the relative contributions of core muscle endurance and LE hypermobility as predictors of balance in female collegiate dancers.Cross-sectional.Core muscle endurance was evaluated using the combined average anterior

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2016 International journal of sports physical therapy

26. The Effect of Single-Leg Stance on Dancer and Control Group Static Balance (PubMed)

The Effect of Single-Leg Stance on Dancer and Control Group Static Balance The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic differences of static balance between female dancers (D) with at least seven years of dance experience and female non-dancers (ND) who were typical college students. Participants were tested in single-leg stance. Both the dominant leg (DL) and non-dominant leg (NDL) were tested with the participants shod (S) and barefoot (BF). Kinetic variables (vertical, medio-lateral [ML (...) . D and ND in BF and S conditions with DL and NDL static stance demonstrate different AP and ML GRF when balancing over a 30-second time interval. Data may suggest that ND are more prone to lose their balance. Further investigation is warranted to understand whether individuals in the rehabilitative field and athletic populations can use dance therapy for injury prevention and rehabilitation.

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2016 International journal of exercise science

27. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout” (PubMed)

Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout” The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve "turning out" or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg (...) alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements

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2016 Open access journal of sports medicine

28. Athletes Doing Arabesques: Important Considerations in the Care of Young Dancers. (PubMed)

Athletes Doing Arabesques: Important Considerations in the Care of Young Dancers. Dance is as much a sport as an art form. Sports medicine clinicians seeing dancers in their practice will need to be familiar with the unique characteristics of dance in order to provide proper care. Dance encompasses different forms, which vary in equipment and terminology. The epidemiology of dance injuries has historically focused on ballet, but there is increasing research on other dance forms. Lower extremity (...) and back injuries predominate. Injury prevention, both primary and secondary, is at the heart of dance medicine. Primary prevention includes preseason conditioning, identifying risk factors for injury, and recognizing the female athlete triad. Secondary prevention includes a comprehensive approach to injury rehabilitation, an appreciation for the unique demands of dance, and an understanding of the particulars of the injury being treated. Dancers may have difficulty accessing medical care or following

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2017 Current Sports Medicine Reports

29. Caring for the dancer: special considerations for the performer and troupe. (PubMed)

Caring for the dancer: special considerations for the performer and troupe. The needs of a dancer patient can be daunting to the uninitiated physician. A dancer's technique, environment, and mentality are unique among athletes. Compared with popular team sports, like football or basketball, physicians are often unfamiliar with dancers' injuries and requirements to facilitate a safe, timely return to dance. The goal of this article is to help foster better communication between dancers (...) and the medical community by describing dance epidemiology, dance basics including technique and characteristics, and some specific dance injuries.

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2017 Current Sports Medicine Reports

30. Injuries in professional dancers: a systematic review

Injuries in professional dancers: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing

2016 PROSPERO

31. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update. (PubMed)

Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update. The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search (...) the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal

2012 Journal of dance medicine & science : official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science

32. Dancer Injuries

Dancer Injuries Dancer Injuries Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Dancer Injuries Dancer Injuries Aka: Dancer Injuries (...) , Ballet Injuries II. Epidemiology Classical ballet ranks above s for injury More injuries than football and hockey III. Associated Conditions , , knee injuries are most common s Female athletic triad Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Dancer Injuries." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Art Therapy About

2015 FP Notebook

33. Prevalence of Chondromalacia Patella Among Adolescent Dancers

Chondromalacia Cartilage Diseases Other: Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Detailed Description: A cross sectional study in which comparing of dancers to non-dancers athletes will be carried. Specifically, chondromalacia patella will be studied and compared between dancers with and without knee injuries and non-dancers athletes. Study will include detailed function and pain questionnaires, physical findings and sonographic study of the knee joint. Study Design Go to Layout table for study (...) to Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment Dancers with knee injury A cohort of dancers with reported knee injury. Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Other: Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Function and pain questioners, physical findings and sonographic study of the knee joint Dancers with no knee injury A cohort of dancers without reported knee injury. Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Other: Questionnaires, physical exam, US of the knee Function and pain questioners

2015 Clinical Trials

34. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus in a Break-Dancer (PubMed)

. eng Journal Article 2014 01 17 United States Eplasty 101316107 1937-5719 break dancer extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture trauma wrist 2014 2 7 6 0 2014 2 7 6 0 2014 2 7 6 1 epublish 24501618 PMC3899809 Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg. 2004;38(1):32-5 15074721 Injury. 2009 Nov;40(11):1207-11 19540489 Eplasty. 2013;13:e11 23460929 Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ). 1996 Feb;25(2):118-22 8640381 (...) Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus in a Break-Dancer 24501618 2014 02 06 2018 11 13 1937-5719 14 2014 Eplasty Eplasty Spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus in a break-dancer. e4 Shifflett Grant D GD Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY. Ek Eugene T H ET Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY. Weiland Andrew J AJ Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

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2014 Eplasty

35. Effect of a physical conditioning versus health promotion intervention in dancers: A randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of a physical conditioning versus health promotion intervention in dancers: A randomized controlled trial. Although dancing requires extensive physical exertion, dancers do not often train their physical fitness outside dance classes. Reduced aerobic capacity, lower muscle strength and altered motor control have been suggested as contributing factors for musculoskeletal injuries in dancers. This randomized controlled trial examined whether an intervention program improves aerobic (...) capacity and explosive strength and reduces musculoskeletal injuries in dancers. Forty-four dancers were randomly allocated to a 4-month conditioning (i.e. endurance, strength and motor control training) or health promotion program (educational sessions). Outcome assessment was conducted by blinded assessors. When accounting for differences at baseline, no significant differences were observed between the groups following the intervention, except for the subscale "Pain" of the Short Form 36

2014 Manual therapy Controlled trial quality: uncertain

36. Musculoskeletal injuries in young ballet dancers. (PubMed)

Musculoskeletal injuries in young ballet dancers. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries, site and type of injury, and the most common injury diagnoses in young ballet dancers at the Royal Swedish Ballet School, a public school in Stockholm.This retrospective study of 476 students (297 girls and 179 boys) aged 10-21 years was based on medical records for the period August 1988 to June 1995. Data on diagnosis, site of injury and type of injury were (...) collected, and the injuries were classified as traumatic or due to overuse.In total, 438 injuries were recorded. The injury incidence rate was 0.8 per 1,000 dance hours in both female and male dancers and tended to increase with increasing age. Most injuries occurred as the result of overuse. Seventy-six per cent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities. Ankle sprain was the most common traumatic diagnosis, while the most common overuse-related diagnosis was tendinosis pedis. A few gender

2011 Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

37. Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 1: Influence of sex on risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. (PubMed)

Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 1: Influence of sex on risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among dancers is much lower than among team sport athletes, and no clear disparity between sexes has been reported in the dance population. Although numerous studies have observed differences in landing biomechanics of the lower extremity between male and female team sport athletes (...) , there is currently little research examining the landing biomechanics of male and female dancers and none comparing athletes to dancers. Comparing the landing biomechanics within these populations may help explain the lower overall ACL injury rates and lack of sex disparity.The purpose was to compare the effects of sex and group (dancer vs team sport athlete) on single-legged drop-landing biomechanics. The primary hypothesis was that female dancers would perform a drop-landing task without demonstrating typical

2014 American Journal of Sports Medicine

38. Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 2: Influence of fatigue and implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury. (PubMed)

Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 2: Influence of fatigue and implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Fatigue is strongly linked to an increased risk of injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. Part 1 of this study identified differences in the biomechanics of landing from a jump between dancers and team athletes, particularly female athletes, which may explain the epidemiological differences in ACL injuries (...) with mechanics that were more at risk for ACL injuries as compared with before fatigue.Dancers took significantly longer to reach fatigue than team athletes. Female athletes consistently exhibited landing patterns associated with a risk for ACL injuries when compared with the other 3 groups. Fatigue changed landing mechanics similarly in both dancers and athletes, such that all groups landed with worse alignment after being fatigued.Dancers are more resistant to lower extremity fatigue than athletes

2014 American Journal of Sports Medicine

39. A cross-sectional study of the biopsychosocial characteristics of elite adult irish dancers and their association with musculoskeletal pain and injury. (PubMed)

A cross-sectional study of the biopsychosocial characteristics of elite adult irish dancers and their association with musculoskeletal pain and injury.

2014 British Journal of Sports Medicine

40. Challenges in reporting systematic reviews on epidemiological sport injury data: Letter to the editor re: "Upholding standards of reporting in the synthesis of dance epidemiology literature" re: "Prevalence and profile of musculoskeletal injuries in balle (PubMed)

sport injury data: Letter to the editor re: "Upholding standards of reporting in the synthesis of dance epidemiology literature" re: "Prevalence and profile of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet dancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis". 131-132 S1466-853X(16)30103-1 10.1016/j.ptsp.2016.09.009 Smith Toby T Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. Electronic address: toby.smith@uea.ac.uk. Davies Leigh L Physiotherapy Department, Norfolk and Norwich (...) Challenges in reporting systematic reviews on epidemiological sport injury data: Letter to the editor re: "Upholding standards of reporting in the synthesis of dance epidemiology literature" re: "Prevalence and profile of musculoskeletal injuries in balle 27692739 2017 04 05 2018 12 02 1873-1600 22 2016 11 Physical therapy in sport : official journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine Phys Ther Sport Challenges in reporting systematic reviews on epidemiological

2016 Physical therapy in sport : official journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine

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