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Dancer Injuries

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281. Proximal hamstring strains of stretching type in different sports: injury situations, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, and return to sport. (PubMed)

Proximal hamstring strains of stretching type in different sports: injury situations, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, and return to sport. Hamstring strains can be of at least 2 types, 1 occurring during high-speed running and the other during motions in which the hamstring muscles reach extreme lengths, as documented for sprinters and dancers.Hamstring strains in different sports, with similar injury situations to dancers, also show similarities in symptoms, injury (...) to the proximal posterior thigh, earlier described in dancers. Because of the prolonged recovery time associated with this type of injury, correct diagnosis, based on history and palpation, and adequate information to the subject are essential.

2008 American Journal of Sports Medicine

282. Postero-lateral subluxation of the superior tibio-fibular joint. (PubMed)

Postero-lateral subluxation of the superior tibio-fibular joint. Foot drop resulting from subluxation of the superior tibio-fibular joint is described in a female dancer. Spontaneous resolution of the nerve injury occurred over two months with no residual joint instability. Expectant management is recommended for this injury. The potential for this unusual injury, in a wide variety of sports, is pointed out.

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1989 British Journal of Sports Medicine

283. Ankle sprains and instability in dancers. (PubMed)

Ankle sprains and instability in dancers. Ankle inversion injuries are the most common traumatic injuries in dancers. Ankle stability is integral to normal mobilization and to minimizing the risk for ankle sprain. The ability of the dynamic and static stabilizers of the ankle joint to maintain their structural integrity is a major component of the normal gait cycle. In the world of dance, this quality assumes even greater importance given the range of movement and stresses imposed on the ankle

2008 Clinics in Sports Medicine

284. Posterior ankle pain in dancers. (PubMed)

Posterior ankle pain in dancers. Treatment of dancers can be as challenging as it is rewarding. Dancers often have unusual difficulties related to the altered kinesiology required by their individual dance form. A thorough understanding of these movements helps guide the physician to the cause of the disability, particularly in the setting of overuse injuries. This knowledge, coupled with a careful physical examination, is essential for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the dancer, who

2008 Clinics in Sports Medicine

285. Posterior tibial tendon tears in dancers. (PubMed)

Posterior tibial tendon tears in dancers. Posterior tibial tendon tears in dancers are uncommon. No case series of such injuries has been presented. The injury does however occur, and should be differentiated from the more common causes of medial hindfoot symptoms in dancers. The relevant anatomy, biomechanics, and differential diagnosis are presented followed by a summary of four cases.

2008 Clinics in Sports Medicine

286. Forefoot injuries in dancers. (PubMed)

Forefoot injuries in dancers. Dancers, particularly ballet dancers, are artists and athletes. In dance, the choreographer acts as a sculptor, using the dancer as a medium of expression. This often entails placing the dancer's body in positions that require extraordinary flexibility and movement, which requires controlled power and endurance. Ballet and other forms of dance can be highly demanding activities, with a lifetime injury incidence of up to 90%. Ballet is stressful particularly (...) on the dancer's forefoot. The en pointe position of maximal plantarflexion through the forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot requires tremendous flexibility and strength that only can be attained safely through many years of training. The forces experienced by the toes and metatarsals are extraordinary.

2008 Clinics in Sports Medicine

287. Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study. (PubMed)

Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study. Ballet and modern dance are jump-intensive activities, but little is known about the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among dancers.Rigorous jump and balance training has been shown in some prospective studies to significantly reduce ACL injury rates among athletes. Dancers advance to the professional level only after having achieved virtuosic jump (...) and balance technique. Therefore, dancers on the elite level may be at relatively low risk for ACL injury.Descriptive epidemiology study.Dance exposure, injuries, and injury conditions were systematically recorded at 4 dance organizations over 5 years. Select neuromuscular and psychometric variables were compared between and within ACL-injured and noninjured dancers.Of 298 dancers, 12 experienced an ACL injury over the 5-year period. The incidence of ACL injury was 0.009 per 1000 exposures. Landing from

2008 American Journal of Sports Medicine

288. Type of acute hamstring strain affects flexibility, strength, and time to return to pre-injury level. (PubMed)

Type of acute hamstring strain affects flexibility, strength, and time to return to pre-injury level. To investigate possible links between aetiology of acute, first time hamstring strains in sprinters and dancers and recovery of flexibility, strength, and function as well as time to return to pre-injury level. [figure: see text].Eighteen elite sprinters and 15 professional dancers with a clinically diagnosed hamstring strain were included. They were clinically examined and tested two, 10, 21 (...) , and 42 days after the acute injury. Range of motion in hip flexion and isometric strength in knee flexion were measured. Self estimated and actual time to return to pre-injury level were recorded. Hamstring reinjuries were recorded during a two year follow up period.All the sprinters sustained their injuries during high speed sprinting, whereas all the dancers were injured while performing slow stretching type exercises. The initial loss of flexibility and strength was greater in sprinters than

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2006 British Journal of Sports Medicine

289. A survey of injuries among Broadway performers. (PubMed)

A survey of injuries among Broadway performers. To obtain more information about injuries of Broadway performers, 313 performers appearing in 23 Broadway companies were surveyed. The percentage of performers injured was 55.5%, with a mean of 1.08 injuries performer. Lower extremity injuries were the most common. Sixty-two percent of performers believed that their injuries were preventable. As this study reports factors that significantly increase the risk of injury for dancers and actors (...) , it may help to heighten concern with reducing the incidence of injuries to professional performers, theatrical students, and nonprofessionals worldwide.

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1996 American Journal of Public Health

290. Relationship between nutrient intake, body mass index, menstrual function, and ballet injury. (PubMed)

Relationship between nutrient intake, body mass index, menstrual function, and ballet injury. The effects of inadequate nutrition, menstrual dysfunction, and low body weight on the injury rate of ballerinas were studied. Forty-nine female ballet dancers, mean age 18.7 years, completed food frequency and injury questionnaires. Subjects were placed in one of two groups: those with an intake less than 70% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for key nutrients and those with an intake (...) greater than 70% of the RDA for key nutrients. Sixty-nine percent of the dancers had intakes less than 70% of the RDA and were randomly assigned to either a vitamin/mineral supplement or to placebo for 6 months. The remaining dancers with diets adequate (greater than 70% RDA) in key nutrients received no treatment. All groups were questioned monthly about the incidence, severity, and nature of ballet injuries. Information regarding menses and height and weight was obtained. There were no significant

1989 Journal of the American Dietetic Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

291. Hypermobility and injuries in a professional ballet company. (PubMed)

Hypermobility and injuries in a professional ballet company. A study was conducted on members of the Cape Performing Arts Board (CAPAB) professional ballet company to determine the prevalence of hypermobility and to document the injuries sustained over a ten year period. If forward flexion, which is acquired through training, is excluded as a parameter the difference in hypermobility between dancers and controls is not statistically significant. Considering the stresses imposed (...) on the musculoskeletal system, the number of injuries was surprisingly low. Ligamentous injuries about the ankle and knee were both common and accounted for the major morbidity. There were minor differences in the nature and severity of injuries in the male and female dancers. Back injuries, fractures and osteoarthrosis were uncommon and shin splints was not recorded in any of the dancers.

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1984 British Journal of Sports Medicine

292. Joint laxity and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome in student and professional ballet dancers. (PubMed)

skin.Hypermobility and BJHS are common in both male and female student and professional ballet dancers. The fall in prevalence, and the greater reporting of arthralgia with other features of BJHS in young female dancers, suggests that BJHS may have an important negative influence, and this may have implications for training. The same pattern was not observed in males, suggesting that their pain-reporting and injury are related to factors other than BJHS. (...) Joint laxity and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome in student and professional ballet dancers. To ascertain the prevalence of hypermobility and the benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) in male and female student and professional ballet dancers, and explore whether BJHS has any effect on a dance career.Students from the Royal Ballet School and professional dancers from the Royal Ballet Company, London, were compared with a control group of teenagers and adults from a local secondary

2004 Journal of Rheumatology

293. The influence of second toe and metatarsal length on stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal in classical dancers. (PubMed)

The influence of second toe and metatarsal length on stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal in classical dancers. Stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal frequently occur in female classical dancers. There is a strong belief that a foot shape in which the first metatarsal or toe is shorter than the second metatarsal or toe increases the risk of this injury in dancers. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence to support this theory. The objective of this study (...) was to examine the influence of the relative length difference between the first and second metatarsals and first and second toes on the frequency of stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal in elite, female classical dancers.Both feet of 50 elite female classical dancers were measured for length differences between the first and second toes and first and second metatarsals. Retrospective analysis of dancers' medical histories revealed 17 feet with stress injury and 83 without. The mean

2007 Foot & Ankle International

294. Rupture of the ankle extensor retinaculum in a dancer. (PubMed)

Rupture of the ankle extensor retinaculum in a dancer. 11193063 2001 02 08 2018 11 13 0141-0768 93 12 2000 Dec Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine J R Soc Med Rupture of the ankle extensor retinaculum in a dancer. 638-9 Tytherleigh-Strong G G Department of Orthopaedics, Wexham Park Hospital, Slough, Berkshire SL2 4HL, UK. g.t.-strong@virgin.net Baxandall R R Unwin A A eng Case Reports Journal Article England J R Soc Med 7802879 0141-0768 IM Adolescent Ankle Injuries etiology surgery (...) Dancing injuries Female Humans Muscle, Skeletal injuries surgery Rupture etiology Skating injuries Tendon Injuries etiology surgery 2001 2 24 12 0 2001 3 3 10 1 2001 2 24 12 0 ppublish 11193063 PMC1298170 10.1177/014107680009301209 Dis Mon. 1992 May;38(5):266-331 1572232 J R Soc Med. 2000 Dec;93(12):641 11193065 Am Rev Tuberc. 1951 Jan;63(1):67-75 14799793 Ann Intern Med. 1964 Sep;61:385-401 14218925

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2000 Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

295. Break dancer's fracture of the fifth metatarsal. (PubMed)

Break dancer's fracture of the fifth metatarsal. 3976214 1985 03 26 2008 11 20 0093-0415 142 1 1985 Jan The Western journal of medicine West. J. Med. Break dancer's fracture of the fifth metatarsal. 101 Dieden J D JD eng Case Reports Letter United States West J Med 0410504 0093-0415 IM Adolescent Dancing Fractures, Bone etiology Humans Male Metatarsus injuries 1985 1 1 1985 1 1 0 1 1985 1 1 0 0 ppublish 3976214 PMC1305958

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1985 Western Journal of Medicine

296. Perception of Musculoskeletal Injury in Professional Dancers

Perception of Musculoskeletal Injury in Professional Dancers Perception of Musculoskeletal Injury in Professional Dancers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Perception of Musculoskeletal Injury (...) Organization Information provided by: University Health Network, Toronto Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The annual frequency of injury among dancers has been reported to range between 23-84% while as many as 95% of professional dancers have ongoing pain. The discrepancy between the number of reported injuries and the amount of pain reported at any given time could be related to the definition of injury, or how dancers' themselves perceive injury with respect to pain and activity

2007 Clinical Trials

297. Eight in 10 dancers have an injury each year, survey shows (PubMed)

Eight in 10 dancers have an injury each year, survey shows 16166121 2005 09 22 2016 11 24 1756-1833 331 7517 2005 Sep 17 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Eight in 10 dancers have an injury each year, survey shows. 594 Dobson Roger R eng News England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM Dancing injuries Female Humans Incidence Male United Kingdom epidemiology 2005 9 17 9 0 2005 9 24 9 0 2005 9 17 9 0 ppublish 16166121 331/7517/594-b 10.1136/bmj.331.7517.594-b PMC1215583

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2005 BMJ : British Medical Journal

298. Psychological intervention programs for reduction of injury in ballet dancers. (PubMed)

Psychological intervention programs for reduction of injury in ballet dancers. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two psychological interventions designed to reduce injury among dancers by enhancing coping skills. Participants were 35 ballet dancers. They were assigned to three conditions: control (n = 12), autogenic training (n = 12), and a broad-based coping skills condition, including autogenic training, imagery, and self-talk (n = 11). The 12-week interventions were (...) designed on the basis of results from previous studies. For the 12 weeks following the intervention, participants were asked to practice their respective interventions three times a week. During the 24-week period (12 weeks training plus 12 weeks practice), training staff at the dance academies recorded injuries on a record sheet each day. Participants wrote injury records by themselves for another 24 weeks. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and univariate tests for each dependent variable

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2007 Research in sports medicine (Print) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

299. Injuries to dancers: prevalence, treatment, and perceptions of causes. (PubMed)

Injuries to dancers: prevalence, treatment, and perceptions of causes. A survey of injuries to dancers was commissioned by the National Organisation of Dance and Mime. Questionnaires asking about chronic and recent injuries were sent to 188 dancers and completed by 141 dancers from seven professional ballet and modern dance companies in the United Kingdom (75% response rate). It was found that of the 141 dancers, 67 (47%) had experienced a chronic injury and 59 (42%) an injury in the previous (...) six months that had affected their dancing. A high proportion of injuries to the soft tissues had not responded to treatment. With correct treatment such injuries should usually heal completely. Dancers are aware of the high rate of injuries and also of procedures that might help to prevent injury--for example, dancing on floors that are sprung and in warmer studios; teachers' and choreographers' awareness of a dancer's limitations and the need for rest and adequate treatment when an injury occurs.

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1989 BMJ : British Medical Journal

300. Osteopenia as a risk factor for injuries to dancers. (PubMed)

Osteopenia as a risk factor for injuries to dancers. 2500180 1989 08 09 2018 11 13 0959-8138 298 6681 1989 Apr 29 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Osteopenia as a risk factor for injuries to dancers. 1176-7 Horváth C C Holló I I eng Comment Comparative Study Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1989 Mar 18;298(6675):731-4 2496824 Bone Diseases, Metabolic complications Dancing Female Fractures, Bone etiology Humans Male Risk Factors 1989 4 29 1989 4 29 0 1 1989 4 29 0 0 ppublish

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1989 BMJ : British Medical Journal

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