How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

288 results for

Dancer Injuries

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

281. Eight in 10 dancers have an injury each year, survey shows Full Text available with Trip Pro

Eight in 10 dancers have an injury each year, survey shows 16166121 2005 09 22 2016 11 24 1756-1833 331 7517 2005 Sep 17 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Eight in 10 dancers have an injury each year, survey shows. 594 Dobson Roger R eng News England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM Dancing injuries Female Humans Incidence Male United Kingdom epidemiology 2005 9 17 9 0 2005 9 24 9 0 2005 9 17 9 0 ppublish 16166121 331/7517/594-b 10.1136/bmj.331.7517.594-b PMC1215583

2005 BMJ : British Medical Journal

282. Psychological intervention programs for reduction of injury in ballet dancers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Psychological intervention programs for reduction of injury in ballet dancers. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two psychological interventions designed to reduce injury among dancers by enhancing coping skills. Participants were 35 ballet dancers. They were assigned to three conditions: control (n = 12), autogenic training (n = 12), and a broad-based coping skills condition, including autogenic training, imagery, and self-talk (n = 11). The 12-week interventions were (...) designed on the basis of results from previous studies. For the 12 weeks following the intervention, participants were asked to practice their respective interventions three times a week. During the 24-week period (12 weeks training plus 12 weeks practice), training staff at the dance academies recorded injuries on a record sheet each day. Participants wrote injury records by themselves for another 24 weeks. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and univariate tests for each dependent variable

2007 Research in sports medicine (Print) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

283. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in professional dancers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anterior cruciate ligament injury in professional dancers. Anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) is a common sport injury; however, there are no data concerning dance and ACL injury. We report the incidence, injury mechanism, and clinical follow-up of ACL injury in professional dancers.In a retrospective cohort study involving the three major dance companies in the Netherlands, by interviewing all 253 dancers who had had a full-time contract during 1991-2002, dancers with symptomatic ACL (...) injury or past ACL reconstruction were identified and examined.6 dancers (2 of whom were women) had had a symptomatic ACL rupture and reconstruction. Interestingly, all had been on the left side and had had a similar trauma mechanism: while dancing a classical variation they landed, after a jump, on their left leg, in the turned out position with a valgus force on their knee. There was a higher risk of ACL injury in the classical company than in the two contemporary companies. The risk of dancers

2008 Acta Orthopaedica

284. Osteopenia as a risk factor for injuries to dancers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Osteopenia as a risk factor for injuries to dancers. 2500180 1989 08 09 2018 11 13 0959-8138 298 6681 1989 Apr 29 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Osteopenia as a risk factor for injuries to dancers. 1176-7 Horváth C C Holló I I eng Comment Comparative Study Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1989 Mar 18;298(6675):731-4 2496824 Bone Diseases, Metabolic complications Dancing Female Fractures, Bone etiology Humans Male Risk Factors 1989 4 29 1989 4 29 0 1 1989 4 29 0 0 ppublish

1989 BMJ : British Medical Journal

285. Injuries to dancers: prevalence, treatment, and perceptions of causes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Injuries to dancers: prevalence, treatment, and perceptions of causes. A survey of injuries to dancers was commissioned by the National Organisation of Dance and Mime. Questionnaires asking about chronic and recent injuries were sent to 188 dancers and completed by 141 dancers from seven professional ballet and modern dance companies in the United Kingdom (75% response rate). It was found that of the 141 dancers, 67 (47%) had experienced a chronic injury and 59 (42%) an injury in the previous (...) six months that had affected their dancing. A high proportion of injuries to the soft tissues had not responded to treatment. With correct treatment such injuries should usually heal completely. Dancers are aware of the high rate of injuries and also of procedures that might help to prevent injury--for example, dancing on floors that are sprung and in warmer studios; teachers' and choreographers' awareness of a dancer's limitations and the need for rest and adequate treatment when an injury occurs.

1989 BMJ : British Medical Journal

286. Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study. Ballet and modern dance are jump-intensive activities, but little is known about the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among dancers.Rigorous jump and balance training has been shown in some prospective studies to significantly reduce ACL injury rates among athletes. Dancers advance to the professional level only after having achieved virtuosic jump (...) and balance technique. Therefore, dancers on the elite level may be at relatively low risk for ACL injury.Descriptive epidemiology study.Dance exposure, injuries, and injury conditions were systematically recorded at 4 dance organizations over 5 years. Select neuromuscular and psychometric variables were compared between and within ACL-injured and noninjured dancers.Of 298 dancers, 12 experienced an ACL injury over the 5-year period. The incidence of ACL injury was 0.009 per 1000 exposures. Landing from

2008 American Journal of Sports Medicine

287. Forefoot injuries in dancers. (Abstract)

Forefoot injuries in dancers. Dancers, particularly ballet dancers, are artists and athletes. In dance, the choreographer acts as a sculptor, using the dancer as a medium of expression. This often entails placing the dancer's body in positions that require extraordinary flexibility and movement, which requires controlled power and endurance. Ballet and other forms of dance can be highly demanding activities, with a lifetime injury incidence of up to 90%. Ballet is stressful particularly (...) on the dancer's forefoot. The en pointe position of maximal plantarflexion through the forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot requires tremendous flexibility and strength that only can be attained safely through many years of training. The forces experienced by the toes and metatarsals are extraordinary.

2008 Clinics in Sports Medicine

288. The nature and incidence of injuries in morris dancers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The nature and incidence of injuries in morris dancers. Morris dancing includes several distinct forms of vigorous traditional dance with about 5000 amateur participants in the UK and Ireland. Questionnaires were sent to over 500 registered morris sides. The response rate was 29 per cent with 129 acute injuries and 47 chronic injuries including one fatality. The commonest acute injuries were to ankle (33 per cent) and calf (22 per cent). The back was the commonest site of chronic injury (...) , with a high contribution from occupational and other sources. Morris dancing is a relatively low-risk activity, but injuries could be prevented by improving the fitness of dancers and selecting safer surfaces to dance on. The severity of injuries could probably be reduced by seeking more and better treatment.

1989 British Journal of Sports Medicine

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>