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Daily Energy Allowance

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3401. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human milk and brain growth during early infancy. (Abstract)

, the composition of fatty acids in mothers' milk and the growth rate of the infant brain were analysed. Nineteen mother-term infant pairs from Stockholm, Sweden, were studied from birth to 1 mo and 3 mo of age, during which time the infants were breastfed exclusively. The dietary intake of the mothers was calculated and found to concur with the recommended daily dietary allowances of Swedish lactating women as regards energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates. The amounts of linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid

2000 Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)

3402. New approach for weight reduction by a combination of diet, light resistance exercise and the timing of ingesting a protein supplement. (Abstract)

-third of recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamins and minerals) immediately after exercise. Group C did not ingest the supplement. Daily intake of both energy and protein was equal between the two groups and the protein intake met the RDA. After 12 weeks, the bodyweight, skinfold thickness, girth of waist and hip and percentage bodyfat significantly decreased in the both groups, however, no significant differences were observed between the groups. The fat-free mass significantly decreased in C (...) deposition. Therefore, the effect of the timing of a protein supplement after resistance exercise on body composition and the RMR was investigated in 17 slightly overweight men. The subjects participated in a 12-week weight reduction program consisting of mild energy restriction (17% energy intake reduction) and a light resistance exercise using a pair of dumbbells (3-5 kg). The subjects were assigned to two groups. Group S ingested a protein supplement (10 g protein, 7 g carbohydrate, 3.3 g fat and one

2001 Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3403. The effect of conjugated linoleic acid on plasma lipoproteins and tissue fatty acid composition in humans. (Abstract)

, subjects were fed a low-fat diet [30 energy percent (en%) fat, 19 en% protein, and 51 en% carbohydrate] that consisted of natural foods with the recommended dietary allowances for all known nutrients. After a 30-d stabilization period, subjects were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n = 10) supplemented daily with capsules containing 3.9 g of CLA or a control group (n = 7) that received an equivalent amount of sunflower oil. The CLA capsules (CLA 65%) contained four major cis/trans

2001 Lipids Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3404. Intermittent morphine administration induces dependence and is a chronic stressor in rats. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intermittent morphine administration induces dependence and is a chronic stressor in rats. Although constant treatment with morphine (implanted pellets) does not activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, intermittent injections of morphine may constitute a chronic stressor in rats. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of morphine in escalating doses (10-40 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline injected twice daily for 4 days on energy balance, hormones, HPA responses to novel (...) to constant treatment, injected morphine probably allows some withdrawal during each 12 h interval, causing repeated stress. Drug addicts treat themselves intermittently, and stress causes relapse after withdrawal. Thus, intermittent morphine, itself, may promote relapse.

2003 Neuropsychopharmacology

3405. Eating, drinking, and cycling. A controlled Tour de France simulation study, Part II. Effect of diet manipulation. (Abstract)

Eating, drinking, and cycling. A controlled Tour de France simulation study, Part II. Effect of diet manipulation. Field studies during the Tour de France indicated that cyclists consume 30% of daily energy intake as liquid carbohydrate (CHO)-enriched nutrition with the goal of maintaining energy and CHO balance. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of such dietary manipulation during 2 days of long-lasting exhausting cycling on food and fluid intake, energy balance (...) , nitrogen balance, and nutrient oxidation. Thirteen highly trained cyclists were divided into two subgroups receiving ad libitum either a primarily maltodextrin-based beverage (Mf) (20% w/v, 85% maltodextrin, 15% fructose) or a 50/50% composed fructose-maltodextrin (FM) beverage in addition to their normal diet. The study was performed during a 7-day stay in a respiration chamber (2 preparation days, 1 standardized resting day, 2 cycling days, 1.5 standardized recovery days), allowing for continuous gas

1989 International Journal of Sports Medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3406. Dietary intakes of age-group swimmers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

allowances (RDA), while 13 (65%) had iron intakes lower than RDA. Despite identical training loads and body mass, male swimmers had significantly greater (P = 0.004) daily mean (s.d.) energy consumption (3072(732) kcal, 12.9(3.1) MJ) than females (2130(544) kcal, 8.9(2.3) MJ) and were maintaining energy balance. Although the contribution of carbohydrate to total daily energy intake was the same for male (55%) and female swimmers (56%), the females ingested significantly less (P = 0.011) carbohydrate (292 (...) Dietary intakes of age-group swimmers. The purposes of this study were to collect information regarding the dietary habits of male and female age-group swimmers and report the energy consumptions of these athletes in relation to their daily training demands. Twenty competitive swimmers, who were training 6000 m per day 6 days a week, recorded all fluid and food consumed during a 4-day period. Dietary analysis revealed that 11 swimmers (55%) had calcium intakes below recommended dietary

1991 British Journal of Sports Medicine

3407. High-carbohydrate diet for long distance runners--a practical view-point. Full Text available with Trip Pro

the Recommended Daily Dietary Allowances (RDA). Intakes of thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, magnesium and iron were more than twofold, and niacin intake 1,4-fold compared to the allowances. The diet contained sufficient amounts of carbohydrate to refill and enlarge muscle glycogen stores. Moreover the nutritional value was high, and therefore this kind of a diet can be recommended to endurance athletes even on a daily basis. (...) High-carbohydrate diet for long distance runners--a practical view-point. The nutritional value of a high-carbohydrate diet was evaluated. Seven male marathon runners kept a food record diary for the three days preceeding two endurance races. They were instructed in how to compose a diet which contained about 9 g carbohydrate day-1 kg body weight-1. Sixty three per cent of the subjects' total energy intake was derived from carbohydrates. The dietary intake of vitamin C was six times

1989 British Journal of Sports Medicine

3408. The case for daily dialysis: its impact on costs and quality of life

A range of quality of life instruments was used. These were the SF-36, the Nottingham Health Profile, the Sickness Impact Profile, and the Beck Depression Inventory and Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument. Studies reported an improvement of at least 40% from baseline in patient energy, vitality, role-emotional, role-physical, ambulation, household management and eating, with daily dialysis in comparison with conventional in-centre dialysis. No statistically significant reductions in quality (...) The case for daily dialysis: its impact on costs and quality of life The case for daily dialysis: its impact on costs and quality of life The case for daily dialysis: its impact on costs and quality of life Mohr P E, Neumann P J, Franco S J, Marainen J, Lockridge R, Ting G Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed

2001 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

3409. An 83 year old gentleman has copd. He recives courses 30mg daily of oral prednisolone for exacerbations. Over the past year he has had 7 courses. Would he qualify for bone protection?

An 83 year old gentleman has copd. He recives courses 30mg daily of oral prednisolone for exacerbations. Over the past year he has had 7 courses. Would he qualify for bone protection? An 83 year old gentleman has copd. He recives courses 30mg daily of oral prednisolone for exacerbations. Over the past year he has had 7 courses. Would he qualify for bone protection? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY (...) clinical Q&As that have been generated over the years by various services Trip Database have run or been involved in. Trip are keen to retain this collection for a historical and research reasons. More results What is Trip? Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care. Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based

2007 TRIP Answers

3410. Are there special energy requirements for patients with prader willi syndrome? If so how do we calculate these?

we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news. For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Are there special energy requirements for patients with prader willi syndrome? If so how do we calculate these? An e-Medicine article on Prader Willi syndrome (PWS (...) Are there special energy requirements for patients with prader willi syndrome? If so how do we calculate these? Are there special energy requirements for patients with prader willi syndrome? If so how do we calculate these? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only

2007 TRIP Answers

3411. Reproducibility of bone mineral density measurement in daily practice. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reproducibility of bone mineral density measurement in daily practice. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements are frequently performed repeatedly for each patient. Subsequent BMD measurements allow reproducibility to be assessed.To examine the reproducibility of BMD by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to investigate the practical value of different measures of reproducibility in a group of postmenopausal women.Ninety five women, mean age 59.9 years, underwent two subsequent BMD

2004 Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

3412. Sleep Loss and Energy Metabolism in People With Family History of Type 2 Diabetes.

: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Information provided by (Responsible Party): University of Chicago Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The use of energy from food changes when people sleep. However, it is still not known if differences in the amount of nighttime sleep have an effect on the amount of energy that people who have a relative with type 2 diabetes (parent, sibling, or grandparent) use to perform their daily activities. This study is being done to test (...) the hypothesis that the daily use of energy in people who have a history of type 2 diabetes in their family will be different after they have slept short hours for 16 days in comparison to when they have slept longer hours for 16 days. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Sleep Sleep Deprivation Insulin Resistance Type 2 Diabetes Other: 5.5-hour bedtime Other: 8.5-hour bedtime Not Applicable Detailed Description: Study participants will complete two 16-day inpatient stays in the sleep laboratory

2008 Clinical Trials

3413. A Study Comparing Duloxetine and Placebo in Assessing Energy and Vitality in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) Patients

A Study Comparing Duloxetine and Placebo in Assessing Energy and Vitality in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) Patients A Study Comparing Duloxetine and Placebo in Assessing Energy and Vitality in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. A Study Comparing Duloxetine and Placebo in Assessing Energy and Vitality in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) Patients The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00536471 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted

2007 Clinical Trials

3414. Effects of Re-Feeding Duration on Weight Maintenance After Weight Loss With Very-Low-Energy Diets (VLEDs)

a strict liquid very-low-energy diet (470-820 kcal). They selected and paid themselves for one of the following commercially available diets; Modifast® (820 kcal), Nutrilett® (560 kcal) or Cambridgekuren® (470 kcal). Free consumption of non-caloric drinks (<6 kcal/100 g) was allowed. All patients had scheduled nurse visits at week 0 (baseline), 2, 5, 8, and 12. Body weight was registered at each visit and patients were given support and counselling to enhance VLED compliance. Side effects were (...) for total energy expenditure (moderate level of physical activity). Recommended energy distribution for breakfast, lunch and dinner was 20, 35 and 35% of daily energy intake, and 10% from snacks. Dietary prescriptions followed the Swedish Nutrition Recommendations. All patients were encouraged to increase their level of physical activity. Power calculation and randomization: Sample size calculations were based on data from a similar study. A sample size of 75 patients per treatment arm was derived

2008 Clinical Trials

3415. Energy Balance Weight Regulation Study

to Stop Hypertension (DASH)" diet. Participants will eat a standardized weight maintenance diet for 3 weeks. Then, for 6-weeks, participants assigned to either ad libitum group will be given their assigned diet at 120% of there estimated energy needs to maintain weight and allowed to eat as much as desired. Participants assigned to the energy-restricted group will be provided a DASH diet at 67% of their estimated energy needs to maintain weight and asked to eat all foods provided. Food intake (...) will be measured daily. Body weight and hunger and satiety scores will be measured three times a week. Body composition and energy expenditure will be measured before and after the intervention. 24-hour profiles of hormones and other factors that influence central appetite and weight regulation (insulin, leptin, ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1) will be measured before, and on first and last days of the intervention, to compare acute and chronic metabolic effects of the diets. The analysis of primary outcomes will be based

2008 Clinical Trials

3416. Effect of Insulin Detemir on Use of Energy in Type 1 Diabetes

with 2 stable isotopes (2H218O). The clearance of 2H and 18O was measured over a two week period with daily collections of urine. The difference between the clearance of 2H and 18O is a measure of CO2 production rate. This can be converted to provide a measure of energy expenditure. Total Energy Expenditure, Dietary Record Method [ Time Frame: Weeks 14-16, weeks 30-32 ] The total energy expenditure (TEE) measured after each treatment period by the dietary record method. The calculation of energy (...) indirect calorimetry (measurement of O2 consumption/CO2 production) after an overnight fast when subjects would be metabolising a mixture of carbohydrate and free fatty acid. This technique allowed the calculation of the rate of carbohydrate and lipid oxidation. Component of Total Energy Expenditure: Diet Induced Thermogenesis (DIT) [ Time Frame: Week 14, week 30 ] Diet induced thermogenesis (DIT) is a component of TEE (total energy expenditure) and is the energy expenditure following feeding

2007 Clinical Trials

3417. Daily metabolic rate in healthy infants. (Abstract)

Daily metabolic rate in healthy infants. Previous estimates of daily metabolic rate in infants were based on short-term unstandardized measurements of energy expenditure (EE).Determine 24-hour metabolic profiles in infants.Energy expenditure (kcal/min by indirect calorimetry) and physical activity (oscillations in weight/min/kg body weight) were measured in 10 healthy infants (5.0+/-0.8 months, 68+/-3 cm, 7.3+/-0.8 kg) for 24 hours in the Enhanced Metabolic Testing Activity Chamber while (...) allowing parental interaction. Energy intake, 24-hour EE, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) (kcal/kg/day) were determined. In addition, extrapolated 24-hour EE, RMR, and SMR from the first 4 and 6 hours of data were compared with 24-hour measurements.Twenty-four-hour energy intake, EE, RMR, and SMR (mean+/-SD) were 78.2+/-17.6, 74.7+/-3.8, 65.1+/-3.5, and 60.3+/-3.9, respectively. EE and physical activity showed a decrease at 11:30 pm and a return to daytime levels by 5:30

2003 Journal of Pediatrics

3418. [A Czechoslovak low-energy protein diet in the treatment of obesity]. (Abstract)

[A Czechoslovak low-energy protein diet in the treatment of obesity]. The low-energy protein diet providing 1559 kJ is the first accurately defined diet for the treatment of obesity in the CSSR. The daily amount contains 4.0 g fat, 33.0 g protein, 50.0 g carbohydrate, 5.6 g fibre and daily recommended allowances of vitamins. The diet is enriched with potassium, magnesium and iron. The low-energy protein diet was used for a period of 28 days in the treatment of 49 obese patients aged 40.49 (...) . There was a concurrent decline of the urinary C-peptide excretion. The therapeutic regime involving the low-energy protein diet was well tolerated by the patients. The incidence of side effects during treatment was less frequent than in treatment by intermittent fasts. No disorders of the cardiac rhythm were recorded during treatment.

1990 Vnitrni lekarstvi

3419. Rapid versus gradual refeeding in acute gastroenteritis in childhood: energy intake and weight gain. (Abstract)

possible negative effects of lactose. Both dietary regimens were well tolerated, the only difference in the clinical symptoms between the two regimens being a higher stool frequency within the RR group (p less than 0.02). The total energy intake, as well as energy derived from fat and protein, was significantly higher in the RR than in the GR group (p less than 0.0001). The mean daily energy intake of the latter group never reached recommended daily allowance (RDA) levels, while that of the RR group (...) did on day 5. Moreover, during the whole period of dietary regimen, the RR group exceeded the RDA protein requirements (mean intake ranged 175-252%), while the GR group did not reach this RDA level until day 4. Milk was a major source of energy in the RR group, providing 47-59% of the daily energy intake. The short- and long-term weight gains in the RR group were only a little higher than those of the GR group, the difference being insignificant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

1989 Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3420. Effect of ovariohysterectomy on maintenance energy requirement in cats. (Abstract)

Effect of ovariohysterectomy on maintenance energy requirement in cats. To determine whether maintenance energy requirement (MER) to maintain stable body weight (BW) is substantially lower for spayed female cats than for sexually intact female cats and to assess whether an equation commonly used to estimate MER would accurately predict caloric need in spayed cats.Prospective study.10 spayed and 5 sham-operated young adult female cats.During an acclimatization period, initial daily food (...) allowance was determined by estimating MER as 1.4 x (30 x BW + 70), then adjusted weekly to maintain BW within 200 g of baseline. Ovariohysterectomy (OHE) or sham laparotomy was performed at week 7, and the study was continued for 15 additional weeks (period 1). To correct for a presumptive effect of continued musculoskeletal growth that resulted in some cats becoming unacceptably thin during period 1, the study was repeated over an additional 10 weeks (period 2), using a new estimate of MER calculated

1996 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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